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Finance & Administration
PO Box 1510
Pembroke, NC 28372

Phone: 910.521.6209
Fax:
910.521.6878
Relay:
910.521.6209
Email:
businessaffairs @uncp.edu

Location: Lumbee Hall, Room 320
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unc pembroke mold prevention, assessment, and remediation plan

Facilities Planning & Construction Policy FP 11 03

The purpose of this plan is threefold. First it will detail the measures UNCP will take to prevent the formation of mold in its buildings. Second, realizing that mold spores are a naturally occurring substance, present in outdoor air, and that no plan will ever entirely prevent the spores from occasionally finding a suitable spot to grow, this plan will detail how UNCP will take measures to detect the presence of mold early in its growth stages. Finally, the plan will detail how UNCP will remediate mold growth when found, and will be revised as needed as scientific knowledge or regulatory requirements dictate.

Preventative Measures

Responsible Party: UNCP Facilities Operations

Actions Required:

  • Preventative Maintenance of all air-handling units. This will include the following:
    • Monthly filter changes
    • Application of biocide tablets in the condensate pans of air handling units
    • Maintenance of chilled water temperatures to the coils of 45 degrees or less
    • Periodic checks of condensate pans to ensure proper drainage
    • Maintenance of air handling unit fans, motors and belts to ensure proper air flow
  • Preventative Maintenance of Roofs. Roof leaks can be a major source of mold formation in ceilings and walls. Leaks must be addressed as soon as they are detected. Periodic inspections of top floors of buildings should reveal stained ceiling tiles, which typically indicate roof leaks.
  • Preventative Maintenance on toilets, water fountains, laundry rooms. Perform a minimum of monthly inspections of toilets, water fountain areas, and laundry rooms to detect leaks. Leaks will be repaired promptly.
  • Preventative Maintenance on exhaust fans. This will include the following:
    • Monthly checks of fan controls, belts, and motors
    • Monthly checks for leaks around fans
  • Preventative building inspections to detect the presence of mold. Indicators will be actual mold growth on surfaces, musty odors, and stained ceiling tiles. These inspections will be performed on each building monthly.

Detection Measures

Responsible Parties: UNCP Facilities Operations, Building Occupants, Building Coordinators, UNCP Safety Officer, Contracted Industrial Hygiene Consultants

Actions Required:

  • Communication from UNCP Facilities Operations with building occupants campus wide encouraging them to report any areas with apparent mold, stained ceiling tiles, or leaks of any sort.
  • Facilities Operations and Public Safety will conduct preventative building inspections at least monthly accompanied by Building Coordinators for each department inspected to detect the presence of mold. This will consist of personnel walking through each room of the building performing visual inspections. Positive indications such as actual mold growth on surfaces, musty odors, and stained ceiling tiles, will be reported in writing immediately to the Director of Facilities Operations.
  • Building areas will be tested when complaints are received documenting health related issues that may be attributed to mold exposure, or when mold is visibly identified by the inspection team described above. Tests will involve air sampling to obtain mold counts performed by a contracted industrial hygiene consultant who will collect the samples and process them through an independent laboratory. Results of these samples will be sent to occupants of the area sampled, along with information regarding recommendations for remediation, if necessary.
  • Each air conditioning zone (individual area served by a dedicated air handling unit) or floor of each building will be tested for mold spore count at least yearly during the cooling season by a contracted industrial hygienist. Outside air spore levels will also be tested at the time indoor samples are taken. The University policy is that the building air conditioning system operating properly and spores are at an acceptable level if the test results show that the level of spores in the indoor air is 1/3 or less of the level in the outdoor air. Following evaluation of the test results, recommendations will be made by the contracted industrial hygienist for maintenance, follow-up, or remediation if necessary. Results of these tests will be communicated to the occupants of each respective area.

Remediation Measures

Responsible Parties: UNCP Facilities Operations, external contractors as necessary, UNCP Safety Officer

Key Steps in the Process:

  • Consult contracted industrial hygienist as appropriate throughout process
  • Designate remediation manager – the manager will be responsible for initial assessment of the scope of the problem, and for recommendation of in house or outside remediation actions
  • Assess size of mold problem and note type of mold-damaged materials
  • Communicate with building occupants throughout process as appropriate to situation
  • Establish that the health and safety of building occupants are top priorities
  • Demonstrate that the occupants' concerns are understood and taken seriously
  • Present clearly the current status of the investigation or remediation efforts
  • Identify a person whom building occupants can contact directly to discuss questions and comments about the remediation activities
  • Identify source or cause of water or moisture problem
  • Plan remediation, adapt guidelines to fit situation, see Table 1 & Table 2 (note that all remediation performed will be to the standards set forth in Table 2)
  • Choose between outside expertise or in-house expertise
  • Select remediation personnel or team
  • Fix water or moisture problem
  • Remediate
  • Clean and dry moldy materials See Table 2
  • Discard moldy items that can't be cleaned
  • Dry non-moldy items within 48 hours See Table 1
  • Check for return of moisture and mold problem
  • If hidden mold is discovered, reevaluate plan

Table 1: Water Damage - Cleanup and Mold Prevention
Table 1 presents strategies to respond to water damage within 24-48 hours. These guidelines are designed to help avoid the need for remediation of mold growth by taking quick action before growth starts. If mold growth is found on the materials listed in Table 1, refer to Table 2 for guidance on remediation. Depending on the size of the area involved and resources available, professional assistance may be needed to dry an area quickly and thoroughly.

Table 1: Water Damage - Cleanup and Mold Prevention

Guidelines for Response to Clean Water Damage within 24-48 Hours to Prevent Mold Growth*

Water-Damaged Material†

Actions

Books and papers

  • For non-valuable items, discard books and papers.
  • Photocopy valuable/important items, discard originals.
  • Freeze (in frost-free freezer or meat locker) or freeze-dry.

Carpet and backing - dry within 24-48 hours§

  • Remove water with water extraction vacuum.
  • Reduce ambient humidity levels with dehumidifier.
  • Accelerate drying process with fans.

Ceiling tiles

  • Discard and replace.

Cellulose insulation

  • Discard and replace.

Concrete or cinder block surfaces

  • Remove water with water extraction vacuum.
  • Accelerate drying process with dehumidifiers, fans, and/or heaters.

Fiberglass insulation

  • Discard and replace.

Hard surface, porous flooring§ (Linoleum, ceramic tile, vinyl)

  • Vacuum or damp wipe with water and mild detergent and allow to dry; scrub if necessary.
  • Check to make sure underflooring is dry; dry underflooring if necessary.

Non-porous, hard surfaces
(Plastics, metals)

  • Vacuum or damp wipe with water and mild detergent and allow to dry; scrub if necessary.

Upholstered furniture

  • Remove water with water extraction vacuum.
  • Accelerate drying process with dehumidifiers, fans, and/or heaters.
  • May be difficult to completely dry within 48 hours. If the piece is valuable, you may wish to consult a restoration/water damage professional who specializes in furniture.

Wallboard
(Drywall and gypsum board)

  • May be dried in place if there is no obvious swelling and the seams are intact. If not, remove, discard, and replace.
  • Ventilate the wall cavity, if possible.

Window drapes

  • Follow laundering or cleaning instructions recommended by the manufacturer.

Wood surfaces

  • Remove moisture immediately and use dehumidifiers, gentle heat, and fans for drying. (Use caution when applying heat to hardwood floors.)
  • Treated or finished wood surfaces may be cleaned with mild detergent and clean water and allowed to dry.
  • Wet paneling should be pried away from wall for drying.

*  If visible mold growth has occurred or materials have been wet for more than 48 hours, consult Table 2 guidelines. Even if materials are dried within 48 hours, mold growth may have occurred. Items may be tested by professionals if there is doubt. Note that mold growth will not always occur after 48 hours; this is only a guideline. These guidelines are for damage caused by clean water. If you know or suspect that the water source is contaminated with sewage, or chemical or biological pollutants, then Personal Protective Equipment and containment are required by OSHA. An experienced professional should be consulted if you and/or your remediators do not have expertise remediating in contaminated water situations. Do not use fans before determining that the water is clean or sanitary.

† If a particular item(s) has high monetary or sentimental value, you may wish to consult a restoration/water damage specialist.

§ The subfloor under the carpet or other flooring material must also be cleaned and dried. See the appropriate section of this table for recommended actions depending on the composition of the subfloor.

 

Table 2:  Guidelines for Remediating Building Materials with Mold Growth Caused by Clean Water

Table 2 presents remediation guidelines to be followed by in house or external personnel performing remediation for building materials that have visible mold growth. The guidelines in Table 2 are designed to protect the health of occupants and cleanup personnel during remediation. These guidelines are based on the area and type of material affected by water damage and/or mold growth.  Please note that these are guidelines; some professionals may prefer other cleaning methods.  If possible, remediation activities should be scheduled during off-hours when building occupants are less likely to be affected.  Although the level of personal protection suggested in these guidelines is based on the total surface area contaminated and the potential for remediator and/or occupant exposure, professional judgment should always play a part in remediation decisions. These remediation guidelines are based on the size of the affected area to make it easier for remediators to select appropriate techniques, not on the basis of health effects or research showing there is a specific method appropriate at a certain number of square feet. The guidelines have been designed to help construct a remediation plan. The remediation manager will then use professional judgment and experience to adapt the guidelines to particular situations. When in doubt, caution is advised. Consult an experienced mold remediator for more information.

Table 2: Guidelines for Remediating Building Materials with Mold Growth Caused by Clean Water*

Material or Furnishing Affected 

Cleanup Methods†

Personal Protective Equipment

Containment

SMALL - Total Surface Area Affected Less Than 10 square feet (ft2)

Books and papers 

3

Minimum

N-95 respirator, gloves, and goggles

None required 

Carpet and backing 

1, 3 

Concrete or cinder block 

1, 3 

Hard surface, porous flooring (linoleum, ceramic tile, vinyl) 

1, 2, 3

Non-porous, hard surfaces (plastics, metals) 

1, 2, 3 

Upholstered furniture & drapes 

1, 3 

Wallboard (drywall and gypsum board) 

Wood surfaces 

1, 2, 3

MEDIUM - Total Surface Area Affected Between 10 and 100 (ft2)

Books and papers 

3

Limited or Full

Use professional judgment, consider potential for remediator exposure and size of contaminated area

 

Limited

Use professional judgment, consider potential for remediator/occupant exposure and size of contaminated area

 

Carpet and backing 

1,3,4

Concrete or cinder block

1,3

Hard surface, porous flooring (linoleum, ceramic tile, vinyl) 

1,2,3

Non-porous, hard surfaces (plastics, metals) 

1,2,3

Upholstered furniture & drapes 

1,3,4

Wallboard (drywall and gypsum board) 

3,4

Wood surfaces 

1,2,3

LARGE - Total Surface Area Affected Greater Than 100 (ft2) or Potential for 
Increased Occupant or Remediator Exposure During Remediation Estimated to be Significant

Books and papers 

3

Full

Use professional judgment, consider potential for remediator/occupant exposure and size of contaminated area

 

Full

Use professional judgment, consider potential for remediator exposure and size of contaminated area

 

Carpet and backing 

1,3,4

Concrete or cinder block

1,3

Hard surface, porous flooring (linoleum, ceramic tile, vinyl) 

1,2,3,4

Non-porous, hard surfaces (plastics, metals) 

1,2,3

Upholstered furniture & drapes 

1,2,4

Wallboard (drywall and gypsum board) 

3,4

Wood surfaces 

1,2,3,4

*Use professional judgment to determine prudent levels of Personal Protective Equipment and containment for each situation, particularly as the remediation site size increases and the potential for exposure and health effects rises. Assess the need for increased Personal Protective Equipment, if, during the remediation, more extensive contamination is encountered than was expected. Consult Table 1 if materials have been wet for less than 48 hours, and mold growth is not apparent. These guidelines are for damage caused by clean water. If you know or suspect that the water source is contaminated with sewage, or chemical or biological pollutants, then the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires PPE and containment. An experienced professional should be consulted if you and/or your remediators do not have expertise in remediating contaminated water situations.

†Select method most appropriate to situation. Since molds gradually destroy the things they grow on, if mold growth is not addressed promptly, some items may be damaged such that cleaning will not restore their original appearance. If mold growth is heavy and items are valuable or important, you may wish to consult a restoration/water damage/remediation expert. Please note that these are guidelines; other cleaning methods may be preferred by some professionals.

Cleanup Methods

Method 1: Wet vacuum (in the case of porous materials, some mold spores/fragments will remain in the material but will not grow if the material is completely dried). Steam cleaning may be an alternative for carpets and some upholstered furniture.

Method 2: Damp-wipe surfaces with plain water or with water and detergent solution (except wood —use wood floor cleaner); scrub as needed.

Method 3: High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) vacuum after the material has been thoroughly dried. Dispose of the contents of the HEPA vacuum in well-sealed plastic bags.

Method 4: Discard/remove water-damaged materials and seal in plastic bags while inside of containment, if present. Dispose of as normal waste. HEPA vacuum area after it is dried.

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

Minimum: Gloves, N-95 respirator, goggles/eye protection

Limited: Gloves, N-95 respirator or half-face respirator with HEPA filter, disposable overalls, goggles/eye protection

Full: Gloves, disposable full body clothing, head gear, foot coverings, full-face respirator with HEPA filter

Containment

Limited: Use polyethylene sheeting ceiling to floor around affected area with a slit entry and covering flap; maintain area under negative pressure with HEPA filtered fan unit. Block supply and return air vents within containment area.

Full: Use two layers of fire-retardant polyethylene sheeting with one airlock chamber. Maintain area under negative pressure with HEPA filtered fan exhausted outside of building. Block supply and return air vents within containment area.

Table developed from literature and remediation documents including Bioaerosols: Assessment and Control (American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists, 1999) and IICRC S500, Standard and Reference Guide for Professional Water Damage Restoration, (Institute of Inspection, Cleaning and Restoration, 1999).

 

Updated: Wednesday, December 11, 2013

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