2006-07 CATALOG

AEROSPACE STUDIES

Director: Lt. Colonel Evangeline Cheeks (Air Force)

 

Faculty:  Major Michelle Coghill, Captain Russell Brevick

 

AIR FORCE ROTC PROGRAM

General military courses are available for the freshman and sophomore years, and professional officer courses for the junior and senior years.

Advanced credit for a portion of the freshman/sophomore curriculum may be granted for previous participation in high school junior ROTC, Army or Navy Senior ROTC, Civil Air Patrol, military school, or prior active military service.

Qualifications

The general qualifications for general military course entry are as follows: (a) United States citizenship; (b) meeting college entrance medical standards; (c) good moral character, and (d) attending a college or university offering the AFROTC Four‑Year Program or a college or university which has a cross‑enrollment agreement with an institution hosting the AFROTC Program. UNC Pembroke has a cross‑enrollment agreement.

 

OBJECTIVES

The objectives of the Aerospace Studies program are as follows:

* To recruit, train and produce a highly qualified Air Force officer capable of performing effectively in an assigned Air Force specialty.

* To provide a curriculum which is dynamic and responsive to the educational requirements of the Air Force junior officer.

* To provide relevant pre‑professional preparation for future Air Force officers in their freshman and sophomore years.

* To provide relevant pre‑professional preparation for future Air Force officers pursuing the Professional Officers’ Course.

* To stimulate the optimum development of military leadership among students through meaningful experience provided within a functional context.

* To motivate students to pursue flying careers and to provide practical indoctrination in flight operations.

* To strengthen each cadets’ sense of personal integrity, honor, and individual responsibility and enhance knowledge of how the U.S. Air Force serves the national interest.

 

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

To be eligible for the General Military Course (GMC) each individual must:

* Be a full‑time student.

* Be 14 years of age or older.

* Be a U.S. citizen (there are provisions for aliens to participate in the GMC program).

* Be of good moral character.

* Meet University medical standards for admission to the institution.

* Not have been disqualified by disenrollment from an officer training program.

 

To be eligible for the Professional Officers Course (POC), each individual must:

* Be a full‑time student and schedule to receive a baccalaureate degree.

* Be a U.S. citizen.

* Be of good moral character.

* Be certified Medically Qualified by appropriate Air Force medical authorities.

* Be at least 17 years of age.

* Be in good academic standing.

* Successfully complete either GMC or equivalent training and a four‑week Field Training Course.

* Attain a minimum qualifying score on the Air Force Officers Qualification Test.

* Have two academic years remaining when entering the POC.

 

PROGRAM

The General Military Course (GMC) is an introductory level course dealing with mission, organization and function of the U.S. Air Force, and with development of air power into a prime element of national security. The GMC is developmental in nature and is designed to motivate and prepare cadets for entry into the Professional Officers Course (POC). The standard GMC is a two‑year course in Aerospace Studies (ARS). The first year is designated ARS 111 and 112 and the second year ARS 211 and 212. The GMC totals approximately 120 clock hours consisting of a suggested 60 hours of academics and 60 hours of Leadership Laboratory.

The POC subject matter includes a study of the United States armed forces’ role in contemporary society, and the role of the professional officer as a member of society along with theoretical and applied leadership management and communicative skills. The POC is designed to prepare cadets for active duty as Air Force Officers. It is a two‑year course of instruction in Aerospace Studies (ARS) and is normally designated ARS 311 and 312 for juniors and ARS 411 and 412 for seniors. The POC totals approximately 240 clock hours, i.e., 120 hours per year consisting of 90 hours of academic and 30 hours of Leadership Laboratory.

Leadership laboratory provides cadets with practical command and staff leadership experiences through performing various tasks within the framework of the organized Cadet Corps. Leadership Laboratory accounts for 120 hours of the 360 hours normally allocated to Aerospace Studies.

Field Training is an off‑campus training program held at selected Air Force bases during the summer. A six‑week camp is conducted for all students entering the Air Force ROTC two‑year program. All other cadets attend a four‑week encampment. The Flight Instruction Program is an integral part of the Air Force ROTC program. The course is offered to a limited number of highly qualified ROTC cadets who are within 24 months of established commissioning date.

Under the two‑year program selected students may be enrolled in the POC provided they have two full years of college remaining. If contemplating enrollment in this program, a student should do so prior to completion of the sophomore year, to enter Field Training during the summer preceding the Fall semester of his or her junior year.

Uniforms and textbooks for Air Force ROTC are provided by the Federal Government. All students enrolled in the final two years of Air Force ROTC are under contract and receive a subsistence allowance of $250 per month for ARS 100 students that increases up to $400 a month for ARS 400 students.  A limited number of selected students enrolled in the Air Force ROTC program may qualify for scholarships. All scholarships pay the subsistence allowance, fees, tuition, and an annual textbook allowance.

During the four or six weeks of Field Training Program, all students receive pay and travel allowance.

Students may transfer credits received in other ROTC units established under the provisions of the National Defense Act. ROTC credits may be used as free electives. Prior to commissioning, a student must complete requirements for and receive a baccalaureate degree (or higher degree.) Each student must satisfactorily complete a course in mathematical reasoning prior to receipt of a commission; a list of these courses is available in the Aerospace Studies office.

Students enrolled in the program under a four‑year AFROTC Scholarship must satisfactorily complete a 3‑credit hour course in English composition prior to the end of the GMC tenure to maintain scholarship entitlement. GMC cadets receiving scholarships of less than four year duration will have two academic years from scholarship activation to complete the English composition requirement; English composition courses satisfying this requirement are listed in the Aerospace Studies office.

 

COURSES (ARS)

 

ARS 111 & ARS 112.  The Air Force Today: Air Force Organization & Mission

This a survey course designed to introduce students to the U.S. Air force and Air force Reserve Officer Training Corps.  Featured topics include: Air Force mission and organization; officership and professionalism; military customs and courtesies, officer opportunities; group leadership; and an introduction to problem-solving skills.  Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets and complements this course by providing cadets with fellowship experiences. ARS 111-Fall Term, ARS 112-Spring Term.  Credit, 1 semester hour each semester.

ARS 211 & ARS 212.  The Air Force Way

A survey course designed to facilitate the transition from Air Force ROTC cadet to Air Force ROTC officer candidate.  Featured topics include: Air Force heritage and leaders, Quality Air Force, an introduction to ethics and values, introduction to leadership, group leadership problems, and continuing application of communication skills.  Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets and complements this course by providing cadets with their first opportunity for applied leadership experiences discussed in class. ARS 211-Fall Term, ARS 212-Spring Term.  Credit, 1 semester hour each semester.

ARS 311 & ARS 312.  Air Force Leadership and Management

ARS 311 & 312 is a study of leadership, quality management fundamentals, professional knowledge, Air Force doctrine, leadership, ethics, and communications skills required of an Air Force junior officer.  Case studies are used to examine Air Force leadership and management situations as a means of demonstrating and exercising practical application of the concepts being studied.  A mandatory Leadership Laboratory complements this course by providing advance leadership experiences in officer-type activities, giving students the opportunity to apply leadership and management principles of this course.  ARS 311-Fall Term, ARS 312-Spring Term.  Credit, 3 semester credits hours for each semester.

ARS 411 & ARS 412.  National Security Affairs/ Preparation for Active Duty

ARS 411 and ARS 412 examines the national security process, regional studies, advanced leadership ethics, and Air Force doctrine.  Special topics of interest focus on the military as a profession, officership, military justice, civilian control of the military, preparation for active duty, and current issues affecting military professionalism.  Within this structure, continued emphasis is given to refining communication skills.  A mandatory Leadership Laboratory complements this course by providing advanced leadership experiences, giving students the opportunity to apply the leadership and management principles of this course.  ARS 411-Fall Term, ARS 412-Spring Term.

 

 

 

MILITARY SCIENCE (ARMY ROTC)

Director: Army Master Sgt. Johnny Torre

 

ARMY ROTC PROGRAM

Enrollment in the Basic Course is open to all full‑time students, and it carries with it no obligation for military service. Completion of the Basic Course is a prerequisite for application into the Advanced Course.

Prior service in the military, high school ROTC, or membership in a National Guard or Reserve unit may result in direct Advanced Course placement. Entrance into the Advanced Course is selective and is based upon demonstrated performance and leadership potential. Students who satisfactorily complete the Advanced Course and graduate from the University are commissioned as Second Lieutenants into the U.S. Army.

Qualifications

The general qualifications for entry into the ROTC Program are as follows: (a) United States citizenship; (b) meeting college entrance medical standards; © good moral character; and (d) being enrolled as a full‑time student at UNCP.

 

OBJECTIVES

The objectives of the Army ROTC Program are to attract, motivate, and prepare selected students to serve as commissioned officers in the active or reserve components of the Army; to provide a practical understanding of the concepts and principles of military science; to develop a strong sense of duty, honor, and country; to promote teamwork and individual fitness; and to develop an understanding of and appreciation for international relations and national security. Attainment of these objectives prepares students for commissioning, and establishes a solid foundation of their professional development and effective performance in the uniformed services or in civilian enterprise.

The Army ROTC Program is of modular construction and is composed of a Basic and an Advanced Course. Enrollment in the Basic Course is open to all full‑time students, and it carries with it no obligation for military service. Completion of the Basic Course is a prerequisite for application to the Advanced Course. Prior military service, high school ROTC, or membership in a National Guard or Reserve unit may result in direct Advanced Course placement. Entrance into the Advanced Course is selective and is based on demonstrated performance and leadership potential. Students who satisfactorily complete the Advanced Course and graduate from the university are commissioned as second lieutenants.

 

COURSES (MSC)

BASIC COURSES

MSC 101.  Leadership and Personal Development

MSL 101 introduces cadets to the personal challenges and competencies that are critical for effective leadership. Cadets learn how the personal development of life skills such as goal setting, time management, physical fitness, and stress management relate to leadership, officership, and the Army profession.  Focus is placed on developing basic knowledge and comprehension of Army Leadership Dimensions while gaining a big picture understanding of the ROTC program, its purpose in the Army, and its advantages for the student. Credit, 1 semester hour.

MSC 102.  Foundation in Leadership

MSL 102 overviews leadership fundamentals such as setting direction, problem-solving, listening, presenting briefs, providing feedback, and using effective writing skills. Cadets explore dimensions of leadership values, attributes, skills, and actions in the context of practical, hands-on, and interactive exercises.  Continued emphasis is placed on recruitment and retention of cadets. Cadre role models and the building of stronger relationships among the cadets through common experience and practical interaction are critical aspects of the MSL 102 experience. Spring. 1 hour lab per week and 1 hour lecture. Credit, 1 semester hour.

MSC 180.  Military Physical Training  (PED 180)

Taught by a military instructor. Students may use MSC 180 as an alternate to 101 or 102.

MSC 201.  Innovative Tactical Leadership

MSL 201 explores the dimensions of creative and innovative tactical leadership strategies and styles by studying historical case studies and engaging in interactive student exercises. Cadets practice aspects of personal motivation and team building in the context of planning, executing, and assessing team exercises.  Focus is on continued development of the knowledge of leadership values and attributes through an understanding of rank, uniform, customs, and courtesies. Leadership case studies provide tangible context for learning the Soldier’s Creed and Warrior Ethos. Fall. 1 hour lab per week and two hours lecture. Credit, 3 semester hours.

MSC 202. Leadership in Changing Environments

MSL 202 examines the challenges of leading in complex contemporary operational environments. Dimensions of the cross-cultural challenges of leadership in a constantly changing world are highlighted and applied to practical Army leadership tasks and situations.  Provides a smooth transition into MSL 301. Cadets develop greater self-awareness as they practice communication and team building skills. COE case studies give insight into the importance and practice of teamwork and tactics in real world scenarios. Spring. 1 hour lab per week and 2 hours lecture. Credit, 3 semester hours.

ADVANCED COURSES

MSC 301. Adaptive Team Leadership

MSL 301 challenges cadets to study, practice, and evaluate adaptive leadership skills as they are presented with the demands of the ROTC Leader Development Assessment Course (LDAC). Challenging scenarios related to small unit tactical operations are used to develop self-awareness and critical thinking skills. Cadets receive systematic and specific feedback on their leadership abilities.  Cadets begin to analyze and evaluate their own leadership values, attributes, skills, and actions. Primary attention is given to preparation for LDAC and the development of leadership qualities. Fall. Three (3) lecture hours and 1½ laboratory hours per week. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: Completion of ROTC Basic Course, Basic Camp or equivalent.

MSC 302. Leadership Under Fire

MSL 302 uses increasingly intense situational leadership challenges to build cadet awareness and skills in leading small units. Skills in decision-making, persuading, and motivating team members when “under-fire” are explored, evaluated, and developed. Aspects of military operations are reviewed as a means of preparing for the ROTC Leader Development Assessment Course (LDAC).  Cadets are expected to apply basic principles of the Law of Land Warfare, Army training, and motivation to troop leading procedures. Emphasis is also placed on conducting military briefings and developing proficiency in Garrison operations orders. MSL 302 cadets are evaluated on what they know and do as leaders. Spring. Three (3) lecture hours and three (3) laboratory hours per week. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: Completion of MSC 301 or equivalent.

MSC 401. Developing Adaptive Leaders

MSL 401 develops cadet proficiency in planning, executing, and assessing complex operations, functioning as a member of a staff, and providing leadership performance feedback to subordinates. Cadets are given situational opportunities to assess risk, make ethical decisions, and provide coaching to fellow ROTC cadets.  Cadets are challenged to analyze, evaluate, and instruct younger cadets. Both their classroom and battalion leadership experiences are designed to prepare them for their first unit of assignment. Cadets identify responsibilities of key staff, coordinate staff roles and use situational opportunities to teach, train, and develop subordinates. Three (3) lecture hours and  1½ laboratory hours per week. Fall. Credit, 3 semester hours.

MSC 402. Leadership in a Complex World

MSL 402 explores the dynamics of leading in the complex situations of current military operations. Cadets examine difference in customs and courtesies, military law, principles of war, and rules of engagement in the face of international terrorism. Aspects of interacting with non-government organizations, civilians on the battlefield, and host nation support are examined and evaluated.  Significant emphasis is placed on preparing cadets for their first unit of assignment. Case studies, scenarios, and “What Now, Lieutenant?” exercises are used to prepare cadets to face complex ethical and practical demands of leading as commissioned officers in the United States Army. Spring. Three (3) lecture hours and three (3) laboratory hours per week. Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ: Completion of MSC 401.

MSC 421. The American Military Experience (HST 4O6)

A survey of American Military History concentrating on the major factors and events which have influenced US foreign policy during periods of war and peace. Fall. Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ: Completion of MSC 301 or 302.

RETURN TO CATALOG