2008-09 CATALOG

UNDERGRADUATE ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

Baccalaureate Degrees

Freshman Seminar

General Education

ESTHER G. MAYNOR Honors College

Bachelor of Interdisciplinary studies

Teacher Education

Special Programs and Interdisciplinary Programs

BACCALAUREATE  DEGREE PROGRAMS AND AREAS OF STUDY

Accounting and Information Technology

Accounting, B.S.

Business Administration, B.S.

Information Technology Management

American Indian Studies, B.A.

American Studies, B.A. (see History)

Art, B.A.

Studio Art (Ceramics, Digital Arts, Painting, Printmaking, or Sculpture)

Art Education Licensure (K-12)

Biology

Biology, B.S.

Botany

Molecular Biology

Zoology

Biomedical Emphasis

Medical Technology Emphasis

Biology Education Licensure

Environmental Biology

Biotechnology, B.S.

Environmental Science, B.S.

Science Education, B.S.

Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, or Physics

Biotechnology, B.S. (see Biology, Chemistry and Physics)

Chemistry and Physics

Biotechnology, B.S.

Chemistry, B.S.

Professional

Molecular Biotechnology

Pre-Health Professions

Forensic Chemistry

Environmental Chemistry

Pre-Pharmacy

Applied Physics, B.S.

Economics, Finance, and Decision Sciences

Business Administration, B.S.

Economics

Finance

English and Theatre

English, B.A.

English

English Education Licensure

Theatre Arts

Foreign Languages

Spanish, B.A.         

Spanish

Spanish Education Licensure

Health, Physical Education, and Recreation

Physical Education, B.S.

Exercise and Sport Science

Physical Education Licensure (K-12)

Recreation Management/Administration

Athletic Training, B.S.

Health Promotion, B.S.

History

History, B.A.

History

Social Studies Education Licensure

American Studies, B.A.

Interdisciplinary Studies, B.I.S

Applied Professional Studies

Applied Information Technology

Criminal Justice

Cultural Studies

Family Studies

Hispanic Commerce

Hospitality

Public and Non-Profit Administration

Management, Marketing, and International Business

Business Administration, B.S.

International Business

Management

Marketing

Mass Communication, B.S.

Broadcasting

Journalism

Public Relations

Mathematics and Computer Science

Mathematics, B.S.

Mathematics

Mathematics Education Licensure

Computer Science, B.S.

Information Technology, B.S.

Music

Music, B.M. (with Licensure K-12)

Vocal Emphasis

Instrumental Emphasis

Keyboard Emphasis/Vocal

Keyboard Emphasis/Instrumental

Music, B.M.

Musical Theatre

Music, B.A.

Music

Music with Elective Studies in Business

Nursing, B.S.N.

Nursing, B.S.N. (for Registered Nurses)

Nursing, B.S.N. 

Philosophy and Religion, B.A.

Political Science and Public Administration

Political Science, B.A.

Political Science

Pre-Law

Public Administration

International Studies

Professional Education Programs

Elementary Education, B.S.

Special Education, B.S.

Birth - Kindergarten Education, B.S.

Professional Studies and Middle Grades

Middle Grades Education, B.S.

Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, or Social Studies

Psychology and Counseling

Psychology, B.S.

Science Education, B.S. (see Biology)

Social Work, B.S.W.

Social Work

Sociology & Criminal Justice

Sociology, B.A.

Criminal Justice, B.A.

 

 

REQUIREMENTS AND OPTIONS FOR A BACCALAUREATE DEGREE

To earn a baccalaureate degree from the University of North Carolina at Pembroke, students must earn between 120 and 128 hours of course credit in a program of study that includes a Freshman Seminar (FRS 1000), required of all freshmen during their first 15 hours, a General Education program of 44 hours, and at least one academic major.

UNC Pembroke operates on the traditional two‑semester system and offers an extensive summer program designed to permit the academic acceleration of regular university students and to serve the needs of public school teachers. Summer Session is divided into two terms.

 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR

A major is a planned program of study of between 30‑50 semester hours of course credit, exclusive of courses applied to satisfy General Education requirements. At least 15 hours of credit must be in courses numbered above 2999.

Detailed requirements for majors have been established by each department and can be found in the sections of this catalog describing undergraduate programs of study in the College of Arts and Sciences, the School of Business, and the School of Education.

 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A DOUBLE MAJOR

A student may elect to earn majors in two separate disciplines on the condition that the student meets all requirements for each major. The student who completes requirements for more than one major will receive only one degree, but at the time of initial graduation, the record will indicate both majors.

 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A SECOND BACCALAUREATE DEGREE

A student with a bachelor’s degree may receive a second baccalaureate degree if it is a different degree and a different major by fulfilling the following requirements:

(1)The student must meet all the requirements for the second degree and major.

(2)The student must complete a minimum of 30 hours in residence beyond the requirement for the first degree.

(3)  The student must meet with the major department chair to determine an individual education plan.  This plan must be forwarded to the Registrar.

A student without a bachelor’s degree may receive two different baccalaureate degrees by fulfilling the following requirements:

(1)  The student must meet all the requirements for one degree (primary major).

(2)  The student must complete a minimum of 30 unduplicated hours in a different major and a different degree (secondary major).

(3)  The student must meet with both major department chairs to determine an individual education plan.  This plan must be forwarded to the Registrar.

NOTE: Students may be assessed a 25% tuition surcharge once they have attempted 140 degree credit hours.

 

SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAMS

Students earning a baccalaureate degree may take advantage of one or more special programs. Teacher Education and Health Professions Programs are described below. The Evening and Distance Programs are described under the School of Business.  Aerospace Studies (Air Force ROTC) and Military Science (Army ROTC) are described under the School of Education.  The following programs are described in detail in the Special Programs and Interdisciplinary Majors and Minors section of this catalog.

 

SPECIAL  PROGRAMS and INTERDISCIPLINARY MAJORS and MINORS

Esther G. Maynor Honors College Program

Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies Program

Teaching Fellows Program

College Opportunity Program

Career Development Program

Entrepreneurship Certificate Program

American Studies Major and Minor

African American Studies Minor

Applied Gerontology Minor

British Studies Minor

Entrepreneurship Minor

Gender Studies Minor

Media Integration Studies Minor

Personnel and Organizational Leadership Minor

Substance Abuse Minor

World Studies Minor

 

 

ACADEMIC AND PROFESSIONAL CONCENTRATIONS

In addition to majors and minors, a number of departments offer academic or professional concentrations. Any concentration requires at least 18 semester hours, depending on departmental requirements. A student must have a minimum cumulative QPA of 2.0 in academic and professional concentration courses to receive credit for the concentration.  Teacher Education majors subject to The University of North Carolina requirement for completion of a concentration in a basic academic discipline may select one of these academic or professional concentrations to fulfill that requirement or may choose to earn a second major of 30 hours in Philosophy and Religion. Any student may elect to complete an academic or professional concentration in addition to a major. Students considering academic or professional concentrations should consult the appropriate academic department in the College of Arts and Sciences and School of Education sections. 

 

ACADEMIC/ PROFESSIONAL CONCENTRATIONS 

(for Education majors and all students)

American Indian Studies

American Studies

Art

Biology

English

Exercise and Sport Science

Geography

Geology

History

Mathematics

Music

Physics

Political Science

Psychology

Reading

Sociology

Spanish

Special Education

 

 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR

A recognized minor ordinarily consists of 18 to 21 semester hours of courses. With the approval of the department granting the minor, up to six hours of the courses counted toward a minor may be used to satisfy General Education, major requirements, or requirements of an additional minor. The award of a minor requires a minimum cumulative QPA of 2.0 in the minor and the formal approval of the department concerned. Successful completion of a minor will be noted on the student’s official transcript. Student participation in minor programs will be optional.  For more information see departments in undergraduate programs sections or, for *interdisciplinary minors, see Special Programs.

ACADEMIC MINORS

*African American Studies

American Indian Studies

*American Studies

*Applied Gerontology

Art

Art History

Athletic Coaching

*British Studies

Broadcasting

Business Administration

Community Development

Computer Science

Creative Writing

Criminal Justice

Economics

English

*Entrepreneurship

*Gender Studies

Geography

Geology

Health Promotion

History

Information Technology

International Sociology

Jazz Studies

Journalism

Legal Studies

Literature

Marketing

Mathematics

Medical Sociology

Music

Musical Theatre

*Media Integration Studies

*Personnel & Organizational Leadership

Philosophy

Physical Education

Physics

Political Science

Psychology

Public Policy & Administration

Public Relations

Recreation

Religion

Sacred Music

Social Welfare

Sociology

Spanish

Speech

*Substance Abuse

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)

Theatre

*World Studies

Writing

 

FRESHMAN SEMINAR

Coordinator: Elizabeth Froeba

 

A university education requires attitudes and skills that go far beyond what students have needed previously. One of its most distinctive features is its direct confrontation with the limitations of human knowledge. In high school we relied on teachers and textbook writers to decide difficult issues; at the University we move into a domain where experts routinely disagree and many issues have no simple answers. Out of this experience, we learn a new respect for skepticism, open‑mindedness, and our own creativity.

The University also introduces us to much greater personal freedom and independence. We move away from the security of our families into the world of college life. This change forces us to budget our own time and to sustain our own motivation for achievement.

Finally, the content of a university curriculum is more difficult to comprehend and retain than anything we have faced before. We read technical, specialized material and learn words we have never seen. We are asked to identify key ideas on our own and to review for comprehensive examinations.

All of these considerations suggest that new students should receive special instruction preparing them for the unique challenges of university life. Accordingly, The University of North Carolina at Pembroke has developed a course entitled Freshman Seminar (FRS 1000). This course is a regular academic endeavor, with lectures, examinations, and academic credit. Its content is summarized in the description presented below. Students are encouraged to participate actively in this course and to prepare carefully for its examinations. Such effort may prove more valuable than any other activity undertaken during one’s first months at the University.

A grade of “C” (2.0) or better must be earned in order to satisfy the Freshman Seminar requirement.

 

COURSE  (FRS)

FRS 1000.  Freshman Seminar

General introduction to the academic substance, study methods, and special adjustment problems of university life. Conducted by faculty and staff from various departments. Required of all incoming freshmen during their first fifteen credit hours of course work at the University. Fall, Spring. Credit, 1 semester hour.

 

 

GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM

 

Graduation from The University of North Carolina at Pembroke is based on successful completion of General Education, which is required for all baccalaureate degrees, and upon successful completion of a specialized program for a major.

 

The University of North Carolina at Pembroke seeks to graduate students with broad vision, who are sensitive to values, who recognize the complexity of social problems, and who will be contributing citizens with an international perspective and an appreciation for achievements of diverse civilizations. In addition to meeting all major program requirements, students awarded baccalaureate degrees by The University of North Carolina at Pembroke are required to complete a 44‑hour General Education program. The General Education program has been designed to provide students with an understanding of the fundamental principles and contributions of a variety of disciplines and to foster the ability to analyze and weigh evidence, exercise quantitative and scientific skills, make informed decisions, write and speak clearly, and think critically and creatively. To ensure that the goals and objectives are met, course substitutions are not allowed.  The goals and objectives for the General Education Program are:

 

I. Skills

Communication—The UNCP graduate will communicate effectively in writing, speaking, and listening.

The student will

  • use written and oral language appropriate to various audiences and purposes;
  • develop logical arguments that are defended by supporting points, in part by locating material from appropriate sources and by correctly using and documenting those sources; and
  • listen to, understand, and evaluate the communication and communicative contexts of diverse speakers and writers.

Critical ThinkingThe UNCP graduate will read and think critically.

The student will

o        distinguish between facts and opinions, judgments and inferences, inductive and deductive arguments, and reliable and invalid sources of information;

o        successfully apply critical reading skills to a wide range of materials; and

o        demonstrate the ability to apply critical thinking skills to the interpretation and analysis of information from a variety of sources.

Problem SolvingThe UNCP graduate will be a creative problem solver. 

The student will

o        identify and define a problem,

o        collect and organize information necessary to solve a problem,

o        select and conduct appropriate analysis to solve a problem, and

o        make decisions based on evidence and reasoning.

MathematicsThe UNCP graduate will use quantitative methods and mathematical principles to recognize and solve problems, interpret data, and perform basic computation.

The student will

o        express and manipulate mathematical information, concepts, and thoughts in verbal, numeric, graphical, and symbolic form while solving a variety of problems;

o        apply basic math principles to practical situations; and

o        be able to demonstrate mathematical literacy.

TechnologyThe UNCP graduate will understand the role of technology, have the skills necessary to use it, and be able to recognize and adapt to new technologies.

The student will

o        demonstrate knowledge of current/modern technologies;

o        use appropriate technology in the evaluation, analysis, and synthesis of information; and 

o        collaborate with others using technology tools.

II. Knowledge

Arts, Literature, History, and Ideas—The UNCP graduate will demonstrate knowledge of, appreciation for, and understanding of contributions to society of the fine and performing arts, literary works, world civilizations and their histories, and philosophic and religious belief systems.

The student will

  • recognize the contribution of the fine, performing, and literary arts to the human experience; identify the contributions of diverse artists; and evaluate the significance of their works;
  • identify how historical forces influence current events; demonstrate an understanding of the historical context of contemporary issues; and identify one major historical trend in a major world region; and
  • demonstrate knowledge of the religious traditions and philosophical ideas that have shaped individuals and societies.

Individual and SocietyThe UNCP graduate will demonstrate knowledge of human behavior, cultures, and societies as well as social, political, and economic institutions and relationships.

The student will

o        describe the methods used by social scientists to gather, analyze, and draw conclusions from data as they seek to understand individual and group behaviors;

o        identify how the results of social science research is critical to an informed understanding of contemporary social issues; and

o        apply social science principles and theories to understand significant American and world economic, cultural, political, and social phenomena and trends.

Science and NatureThe UNCP graduate will understand the fundamental principles of the natural sciences as well as the purpose, methods, and principles of scientific inquiry.

The student will

o        describe the methods used by natural scientists to gather and critically evaluate data using the scientific method;

o        identify and explain the basic concepts, terminology, and theories of the natural sciences;

o        apply selected natural science concepts and theories to contemporary issues and acknowledge the developing nature of science; and

o        demonstrate an understanding of how human activity affects the natural environment and make informed judgments about science-related topics and policies.

III. Dispositions

Lifelong Learning—The UNCP graduate will be aware of the importance of lifelong learning and demonstrate the skills necessary to support continued personal and professional growth after graduation.

The student will

o        demonstrate an understanding of the importance of lifelong learning and personal flexibility to sustain personal and professional development;

o        demonstrate the ability to access, select, and use information to answer questions relevant to personal and professional situations;

o        take advantage of opportunities to continue learning in a variety of venues; and

o        comprehend the changing nature of society and work and be able to cope with change through self-education.

Health and Wellness—The UNCP graduate will identify factors and know how to make choices that promote health, wellness, and longevity.

The student will

o        assess current lifestyle behaviors and understand the impact of these behaviors on the quality and longevity of life;

o        identify and analyze health-related choices such as movement, nutrition, stress, and leisure as they influence personal wellness; and

o        explain how personal health and lifestyle choices affect society at large and how social and cultural factors affect personal health and lifestyle choices.

Social ResponsibilityThe UNCP graduate will have an understanding of civic duty and a concern for the well-being of individuals, society, and the environment.

The student will

o        demonstrate global awareness, environmental sensitivity, and an appreciation of cultural diversity and

o        prepare for citizenship by identifying personal, social, and political avenues for civic action.

DiversityThe UNCP graduate will demonstrate knowledge of and respect for the rights and views of diverse individuals and cultures.

The student will

o        analyze similarities and differences between his/her own and other cultures that affect values, beliefs, and behaviors;

o        discuss cultural strengths and important contributions made to society by individuals from diverse groups;

o        discuss the benefits of diversity for individuals, groups, and institutions; and

o        define prejudice and discrimination; explain their consequences; and identify ways to reduce them.

Values and Ethics—The UNCP graduate will be able to make informed choices in the light of ethical, moral, and practical concerns; assess the consequences of those choices; and understand alternative perspectives.

The student will

o        distinguish fact from value and explain how values influence decision-making,

o        acknowledge a plurality of cultural and personal values and demonstrate respect for the right of others to express different viewpoints, and

o        analyze and evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of different perspectives on an ethical issue, take a position on this issue, and defend it with logical arguments.

 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS  (44 Hours Total)

For some majors, certain courses may count toward both General Education and Major requirements.  Some courses have prerequisites.  As noted above, course substitutions are not allowed.  Ask your advisor for assistance in selecting appropriate courses.

 

I.  Communication Skills (6 or 9 hours)

ENG 1050  Composition I

ENG 1060  Composition II

A full‑time student must enroll in ENG 1050, Composition I, immediately and must earn a “C” (2.0) grade or better before enrolling in ENG 1060, Composition II. A student must remain continuously enrolled in ENG 1050 and 1060 until he or she has earned a “C” (2.0) grade or better in ENG 1060.

All entering freshmen and all freshmen transfers must complete the ENG 1050 and 1060 sequence successfully before they earn a total of 60 credit hours. All students who transfer with 30 credits or more must complete ENG 1060 during their first 30 semester hours at UNCP. Students who have not completed their composition courses at the end of the allotted time will no longer be permitted to register for 3000 or 4000 level courses. If they attempt to do so, the registrar’s office will cancel their registration and require them to register only for courses below the 3000 level until they receive a “C” (2.0) in ENG 1060. (The Enrollment Management Subcommittee of the Faculty Senate, or in emergencies the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, will consider exceptional cases.)

SPE 1020 Fundamentals of Voice and Diction.

All entering freshmen are required to take this course unless they test out of it.  Upon earning 60 hours, a student must either have satisfied the speech requirement through testing, have taken SPE 1020, or be registered for SPE 1020 in the following semester.

 

II. Academic Content and Skills

A.  Arts and Humanities Division (12 hours): Choose one course from each of these four areas:

(1) Fine Arts

ART 2020 Introduction to Digital Arts

ART 2050 Art Appreciation

ART 2080 Survey of Art I

ART 2090 Survey of Art II 

THE 2500 Introduction to Theatre

MUS 1020 Introduction to Music Appreciation

MUS 1040 Introduction to Jazz Appreciation

MUS 2940 The World of Music: Antiquity to the Baroque Era

MUS 2980 History of Musical Theatre

 (2) Literature (completion of ENG 1050 and 1060 with a 2.0 is prerequisite for these courses)

ENG 2010 Southern Literature

ENG 2020 Contemporary Literature

ENG 2030 Literary Genres

ENG 2050 World Literature Before 1660

ENG 2060 World Literature After 1660

ENG 2080 Women’s Literature

ENG 2090 Literature and Film

ENG 2100 African American Literature

ENG 2190 Latino Literature

ENG (AIS) 2200 Native American Literature

ENG 2230 American Literature Before 1865

ENG 2240 American Literature After 1865

ENG 2470 British Literature Before 1790

ENG 2480 British Literature After 1790

(3) History

HST 1010 American Civilization to 1877

HST 1020 American Civilization since 1877

HST (AIS) 1100 History of the American Indian to 1865

HST (AIS) 1110 History of the American Indian since 1865

HST 1140 World Civilizations to 1500

HST 1150 World Civilizations since 1500

(4) Philosophy and Religion

PHI 1000 Introduction to Philosophy

PHI 1010 Introduction to Logic

PHI 2040 Introduction to Ethics

REL 1080 Introduction to Religious Thought

REL 1300 Introduction to Religion

REL 2050 Religion, Art, and Culture

B. Social Science Division (9 hours): Choose one course from each of three of five areas:

(1)Economics

ECN 1000 Economic Perspectives

ECN 2020 Principles of Microeconomics

ECN 2030 Principles of Macroeconomics

(2)Geography

GGY 1010 Principles of Geography

GGY 1020 World Regional Geography

GGY 2000 Cultural Geography

GGY (ECN) 2060 Economic Geography

(3)Political Science

PSPA 1000 Introduction to Political Science

PSPA 1010 Introduction to American National Government

(4)Psychology

PSY 1010 Introductory Psychology

(5)Sociology

SOC 1020 Introduction to Sociology

SOC (AIS) 1050 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

SOC 2090 Social Problems in Modern Society

Maynor Honors College students only may substitute for courses in two disciplines:

HON 1000 Contemporary Public Issues

HON 2750 The Individual in Society

C.  Natural Sciences and Mathematics Division (9 hours)

Natural Science (6 hours); choose one course from two (2) of the four (4) areas.  Students selecting Physical Science 1100 must select the other course from either Biology/Env. Science or Earth Science.

(1)Biology and Environmental Science

BIO 1000 Principles of Biology

BIO 1030 Basic Human Biology

ENV 2100 Environmental Science

(2)Chemistry

CHM 1300 General Chemistry I

CHM 1400 Chemistry for Health Sciences I

(3)Earth Science

GLY (GGY) 1150 Earth Science

GLY (GGY, PHS) 2460 Weather and Climate

(4)Physical Science

PHS 1100 Physical Science I

PHS 1560 Astronomy

PHY 1000 Elementary Physics I

PHY 1500 College Physics I

PHY 2000 University Physics I

Maynor Honors College students only may fulfill one natural science course requirement with:

HON 1510 Contemporary Issues in Science and Technology

Mathematics (3 hours);  choose one course from those listed below

MAT 1050 Introduction to College Mathematics

MAT 1070 College Algebra

MAT 1080 Plane Trigonometry

MAT 1090 College Algebra and Trigonometry

MAT 2150 Calculus with Applications

MAT 2210 Calculus I

 

III. Physical Education and Wellness (2 hours)

Choose two of the following courses:

PED 1010 Wellness and Fitness

PED 1300 Fitness Walking

PED 1310 Archery

PED 1320 Badminton

PED 1330 Golf

PED 1340 Swimming 

PED 1350 Tennis

PED 1360 Soccer

PED 1370 Bowling

PED 1380 Rhythms & Dance

PED 1390 Racquetball

PED 1410 Physical Conditioning

PED 1450 Volleyball

PED 1460 Weight Training

PED 1770 Advanced Physical Conditioning (Aimed at Varsity Athletes)

PED 1790 Aerobic Dance

PED (MSC) 1800 Military Physical Training

PED (THE) 1810 Stage Dance I

PED (THE) 1820 Stage Dance II

PED 1900 Outdoor Fitness

PED 1910 Spinning

PED 1950 Water Aerobics

 

IV. General Education Program Electives (6 hours, or 3 hours if SPE 1020 required)

Choose two additional courses from those listed below.  These two courses must be from different divisions except for the foreign language option.  Students who take SPE 1020 for Basic Skills take 3 hours of electives, which may not be SPE 2000 or SPE 2010.

Foreign Language Option

Students electing the foreign language option MUST complete two courses of the same foreign language to satisfy the Program Electives area of General Education.

FRH 1310, 1320 Elementary French

FRH 2310, 2320 Intermediate French

GER 1310, 1320 Elementary German

GER 2310, 2320 Intermediate German

ITL 1310, 1320 Elementary Italian

SPN 1310, 1320 Elementary Spanish

SPN 2310, 232 Intermediate Spanish

XXX 131, 1320 Introductory Foreign Language Study

XXX 2310, 2320 Intermediate Foreign Language Study

 

Arts and Humanities Division Elective

American Indian Studies

AIS 1010 Introduction to American Indian Studies

Fine Arts

ART 1010 Elements of Design

ART 2020 Introduction to Digital Arts

ART 2050 Art Appreciation

ART 2080 Survey of Art I

ART 2090 Survey of Art II

ART 2560 Web Design

ARTS 1xxx Special Topics in Art

THE 2010 Elements of Acting

THE 2500 Introduction to Theater

MUS 1020 Introduction to Music Appreciation

MUS 1040 Introduction to Jazz Appreciation

MUS 2930 The World of Music: Classical to the Contemporary Era

MUS 2980 History of Musical Theatre

Literature and Speech (a 2.0 in ENG 1050 and 1060 is prerequisite for the ENG courses)

ENG 2010 Southern Literature

ENG 2020 Contemporary Literature

ENG 2030 Literary Genres

ENG 2040 Mythology of All Peoples    

ENG 2050 World Literature Before 1660

ENG 2060 World Literature After 1660

ENG 2080 Women’s Literature

ENG 2090 Literature and Film

ENG 2100 African American Literature

ENG 2190 Latino Literature

ENG (AIS) 2200 Native American Literature

ENG 2230 American Literature Before 1865

ENG 2240 American Literature After 1865

ENG 2470 British Literature Before 1790

ENG 2480 British Literature After 1790

ENGS 2xxx Studies in Literature

SPE 2000 Interpersonal Communication   

SPE 2010 Fundamentals of Speech

History  

HST 1010 American Civilization to 1877

HST 1020 American Civilization since 1877

HST (AIS) 1100 History of the American Indian to 1865

HST (AIS) 1110 History of the American Indian since 1865

HST 1140 World Civilizations to 1500

HST 1150 World Civilizations since 1500

Philosophy and Religion

AIS 2010 American Indian Culture

PHI 1000 Introduction to Philosophy

PHI 1010 Introduction to Logic

PHI (REL) 1020 Perspectives on Humanity

PHI (REL) 2020 Philosophy of Religion

PHI 2040 Introduction to Ethics

PHI 2050 Social and Political Philosophy

PHI 2110 American Philosophy

REL 1050 Introduction to the Old Testament

REL 1060 Introduction to the New Testament

REL 1080 Introduction to Religious Thought

REL 1300 Introduction to Religion

REL 2050 Religion, Art, and Culture

REL 2090 Religion in America

REL (AIS) 2130 American Indian Religious Traditions

REL 2140 Introduction to Religious Ethics

REL 2160 Religions of the Far East

REL 2180 Religions of the Near East

Maynor Honors College students only may take 1 as a Humanities Division Elective:

HON 2000 The Humanistic Tradition I: Pre-History to the Baroque Era

HON 2010 The Humanistic Tradition II: From Baroque to the Present

 

Social Science Division Elective

Economics 

DSC 1590 Technology-Enabled Decision Making

ECN 1000 Economic Perspectives

ECN 2020 Principles of Microeconomics

ECN 2030 Principles of Macroeconomics

FIN 2050 Personal Finance

Geography 

GGY 1010 Principles of Geography

GGY 1020 World Regional Geography

GGY 2000 Cultural Geography

GGY (ECN) 2060 Economic Geography

Political Science

PSPA 1000 Introduction to Political Science

PSPA 1010 Introduction to American National Government

Psychology

PSY 1010 Introductory Psychology

Sociology

SOC 1020 Introduction to Sociology

SOC (AIS) 1050 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

SOC 2090 Social Problems in Modern Society

 

Natural Science and Mathematics Division Elective

Natural Science

BIO 1000 Principles of Biology

BIO 1010 General Botany

BIO 1020 General Zoology

BIO 1030 Basic Human Biology   

ENV 2100 Environmental Science

CHM 1300 General Chemistry I 

CHM 1310 General Chemistry II 

CHM 1400 Chemistry for Health Sciences I 

CHM 1410 Chemistry for Health Sciences II 

GLY 1000 Physical Geology 

GLY (GGY) 1150 Earth Science

GLY (GGY) 1250 Earth History

GLY 2260 Physical Oceanography 

GLY (GGY, PHS) 2460 Weather and Climate

GLY (GGY) 2620 Environmental Geology

PHS 1100 Physical Science I      

PHS 1110 Physical Science II      

PHS 1560 Astronomy

PHY 1000 Elementary Physics I  

PHY 1010 Elementary Physics I 

PHY 1500 College Physics I

PHY 1510 College Physics II

PHY 2000 University Physics I

PHY 2010 University Physics II

Maynor Honors College students only may take the following as a Divisional Elective

HON 2510 Horizons in Math and Computer Science

Mathematics and Computer Science

CSC 2020 Microcomputer Programming

MAT 1050 Introduction to College Mathematics

MAT 1070 College Algebra

MAT 1080 Plane Trigonometry

MAT 1090 College Algebra and Trigonometry

MAT 1180 Finite Mathematics

MAT 2100 Introduction to Statistics

MAT 2150 Calculus with Applications

MAT 2210 Calculus I

MAT 2220 Calculus II

 

 

ESTHER G. MAYNOR HONORS COLLEGE

Dean: Jesse Peters

Associate Dean: Jennifer Bonds-Raacke

 

HONORS COLLEGE COUNCIL

 

Robert W. Brown (Chair), Monika Brown, Thomas A. Dooling, William Gash, Joseph W. Goldston, Jane Haladay, John Labadie, Ramin Maysami, Lee Phillips

 

The Esther G. Maynor Honors College at UNC Pembroke recognizes and promotes the scholarly and personal growth of outstanding students.  Maynor Honors College students are provided interdisciplinary educational opportunities that enhance the general curriculum.  These opportunities are developed around a learning community of honors students and include selected general education courses, small interdisciplinary seminars, cultural and service programs, and shared residential facilities with other honors students.  The Maynor Honors College offers an intellectually stimulating social environment; greater curricular flexibility; more personal contact and scholarly discussion with students and faculty from the various disciplines; and closer interaction with individual faculty members in the College. 

Maynor Honors College students are selected on the basis of class rank, high school grades, Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) scores or American College Testing (ACT) scores, and extra‑curricular and community achievements.  Students already enrolled at UNC Pembroke and transfer students are also eligible to apply for admission to the Maynor Honors College.  Maynor Honors College students are appointed by the Dean of the Maynor Honors College in consultation with the Honors College Council.

To remain in the Maynor Honors College, students are required to achieve and maintain a minimum overall quality‑point average of 3.0 upon completion of the freshman year, 3.25 upon completion of the sophomore year, and 3.5 upon completion of the junior year.  Maynor Honors College students will receive a Maynor Honors College diploma and will be recognized at commencement.  To graduate with the Maynor Honors College designation, the student must complete the Maynor Honors College program.

Two tracks are available for graduation from the Maynor Honors College.

University Honors

*Take four HON (interdisciplinary) courses

*Take at least four general education honors courses

*Have at least a 3.5 QPA overall

*Complete HON 4000 and HON 4500

*Successfully complete and present a Senior Project under the guidance of a mentor

The Senior Project can be one of four possibilities.

1) Community Service Project. This project involves a student’s active participation in a focused project involving service to the community. The student must complete either the Horizon Leadership Program or the Distinguished Leader program, both administered through the Leadership and Service Opportunities Office. The Service Project will be supervised by a UNCP faculty member. During the senior year, the student will schedule an oral presentation, the purpose of which will be to describe the development, implementation, and outcomes of the Community Service Project. The faculty mentor and the Dean of the Honors College will approve the successful completion of the project.

2) Campus Dialogue Project. This project asks the student to become an active participant in campus-wide dialogue about a specific issue, usually relative to the student’s major. The student will work with a faculty mentor to research the topic. During the senior year, the student must organize and facilitate (in consultation with the mentor and Honors College Dean) at least two campus dialogues on the topic. These dialogues should involve faculty and students from a variety of disciplines. The faculty mentor and the Dean of the Honors College will approve the successful completion of the project.

3) Creative Project. Students choosing this option will work with a faculty mentor to develop the project. During the senior year, the student will display or perform his or her art and then provide an oral description/interpretation of the work. The faculty mentor and the Dean of the Honors College will approve the successful completion of the project.

4) Senior Thesis Project. The Senior Thesis is a written research project completed under the direction of a faculty mentor. Guidelines are available in the Honors College Office. The thesis is completed during the senior year, and the student must also schedule an oral presentation/defense of the thesis. The faculty mentor and the Dean of the Honors College will approve the successful completion of the thesis.

Departmental Honors

*Take four HON (interdisciplinary) courses

*Have at least a 3.5 QPA overall

*Complete two Honors Contract Courses in upper level major courses

*Complete HON 4000 and 4500

*Successfully complete and present a Senior Thesis

Description of Contract Courses:

Contract courses require work that is above and beyond the normal expectations of the course. Contract courses must be taught by tenured or tenure-track members of the major department. The student and faculty will agree upon the requirements for completing the contract course, fill out the appropriate paperwork (available online), and obtain the signature of the department chair. The contract and accompanying syllabus will be turned in to the Dean of the Honors College for final approval.

The Senior Thesis is a written research project completed under the direction of a faculty mentor. Guidelines are available in the Honors College Office. The thesis is completed during the senior year, and the student must also schedule an oral presentation/defense of the thesis. The faculty mentor and the Dean of the Honors College will approve the successful completion of the thesis.

Both University and Departmental Honors

*Take four HON (interdisciplinary) courses

*Take at least four general education honors courses

*Complete two Honors Contract Courses in upper level major courses

*Have at least a 3.5 QPA overall

*Complete HON 4000 and HON 4500

*Successfully complete and present a Senior Project (service, dialogue, or creative)

*Successfully complete and present a Senior Thesis

It is possible, though not necessary, that the Senior Project and Senior Thesis are developed from the same research. Students must consult with the Honors College Dean to coordinate the successful completion of both University and Departmental Honors. Those selecting option four for University Honors must also complete option one, two, or three to receive both University Honors and Departmental Honors.

Maynor Honors College students will take several courses together during the freshman year prior to beginning their major course work.  These courses include several general education courses as well as one interdisciplinary seminar.  Students with special scheduling needs as freshmen may petition the Dean of the Maynor Honors College for alternate courses of study during the first semester. All Maynor Honors College students are advised by the Dean of the Maynor Honors College until they declare a major field of study.

The seven HON seminars are usually offered according to the following schedule:

Fall:  HON 1000, 2000, 2510; Spring: HON 1510, 2010, 2750; As Announced: HON 3000

Transfer students and students entering the Maynor Honors College as other than freshmen will also be expected to take the four honors seminars, so long as they can be fitted into the student’s program of study.  The number of honors courses that transfer students or non-freshmen will be required to take will be determined by the Dean of the Maynor Honors College, after consultation with the student and the Honors College Council.

Honors Thesis/Project:  All University Honors College students must complete HON 4000 (Research Methods and Prospectus [one semester hour]) and HON 4500 (Honors Thesis/Project [three semester hours]) prior to graduation.  Maynor Honors College students who elect to complete a senior Thesis/Project in their major department may substitute an equivalent departmental course for HON 4500.  The departmental Thesis/Project must meet the standards for the Honors Thesis/Project established by the Honors College Council.  The Honors College Council and the Dean of the Maynor Honors College recommend that HON 4000 should be taken during the fall semester of the junior year.  University Honors College students should plan on presenting their Thesis/Project at the end of the fall semester of the senior year.  Requirements and procedures for the Maynor Honors College Thesis/Project are outlined in The Preparation of the Maynor Honors College Thesis/Project.  Copies of this guide are available from the Dean of the Maynor Honors College.

 

COURSES (HON)

HON 1000.  Contemporary Public Issues

Analysis of selected contemporary events from the points of view of history, political science, psychology, geography, economics, philosophy, religion, and sociology, in the light of weekly world developments. Emphasis upon the appreciation and development of logic and style in critical thought in considering international and domestic conflicts, human rights and institutional effectiveness, freedom and responsibility, and resources, technology, and the environment. Credit, 3 semester hours. Honors students receive General Education credit for a course in the Social Sciences Division.

HON 1510.  Contemporary Issues in Science and Technology

An interdisciplinary examination of scientific and technological issues of current global significance. The scientific principles relating to each topic will be examined, followed by analysis of management possibilities and problems, technological applications, and implications for society. Where appropriate, laboratory experiences (both on and off campus) will be involved which expose the student to relevant techniques and methodology.  Credit, 3 semester hours. Honors students receive General Education credit for a course in the Physical Science area of the Natural Sciences and Mathematics Division.

HON 2000.  The Humanistic Tradition I: Pre-History to the Baroque Era

Interdisciplinary examination of cultures in selected epochs from prehistory to the Baroque Era. Illustrative works and ideas from literature, art, music, religion, and philosophy, studied to characterize each period and its contribution to humanity’s self‑understanding. Credit, 3 semester hours. Honors students receive General Education credit for a course in the Divisional Electives area of Humanities.

HON 2010.  The Humanistic Tradition II: From Baroque to the Present

Interdisciplinary examination of cultures in selected epochs from the Baroque to the present. Antecedents and consequences of some focal cultural themes chosen for the semester, e.g. naturalism in European literature, the experience of the American frontier, the philosophy of the Age of Enlightenment, and political and social upheaval in the French Revolution. Credit, 3 semester hours. Honors students receive General Education credit for a course in the Divisional Electives area of Humanities.

HON 2510.  Horizons in Math and Computer Science

Current approaches to mathematical modeling, data acquisition, and data analysis with respect to natural systems, emphasizing microcomputer applications to scientific problems. Students will gain experience in the use of available computational resources, including commercial software, microcomputers, and mainframe facilities. Credit, 3 semester hours. Honors students receive General Education credit for a course in the Divisional Electives area of Natural Sciences and Mathematics.

HON 2750.  The Individual in Society

Recent topics concerning advances in the study of human behavior are examined within a seminar format. Relevant readings are assigned on brain/behavior connections, social roles, and theories of personality. Class presentations and discussion form a major portion of the course. Honors students receive General Education credit for a course in the Social Sciences Division.

HON 3000.  Cultures in Contact

This course is designed to introduce students to a specific world culture through a variety of methods. The readings will include sociological, economic, historical, and fictional accounts of this country. The objective is to learn about another culture while also learning how to approach the study of and engagement with that culture. There will also be a travel component to provide for first-hand engagement with the culture studied.  Credit, 3 semester hours.

HON 4000.  Research Methods and Prospectus

Preparation of a prospectus for the thesis or project, in consultation with an advisor. Group discussion on the methodology, standards, and experience of research and criticism. Pass/Fail grading. Credit, 1 semester hour.

HON 4500.  Honors Thesis/Project

Preparation of a thesis or project in consultation with a faculty committee chosen by the student; presentation of the work in seminar. Independent study in the student’s major is encouraged. Credit, 3 semester hours.

HON 4990.  Honors Independent Study

Open to Honors College students to pursue supervised independent innovative learning.  Independent study may include laboratory research, study abroad, or mentored independent projects.  Requires written permission of the proposed mentor and the Honors College Dean. Credit, 1 - 3 semester hours.  May be repeated for a total of 6 hours in no more than two semesters.

 

Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies Program

Ramin Cooper Maysami, Director

James W. Robinson, Associate Director

Interdisciplinary Studies Council: Victor Bahhouth, Alfred Bryant, Nicholas Giannatasio, Lucie Li, Jamie Litty, Enrique Porrúa, Jeremy Sellers, Dennis Sigmon, Chris Ziemnowicz

 

The Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies (BIS) program is exclusively designed for learners with at least two years of transferable credit from institutions other than UNCP, who hold either Associate in Applied Arts or Associate in Applied Science degrees.  The program serves adult students, in particular, who seek a broad, more flexible degree program to help them to advance or become more established in their careers or to improve their understanding of the world around them.

The BIS is intended for a set of diverse students who bring to the university many academic, personal, and work-related experiences.  They may choose the BIS program because (1) they are aware that they are more employable in many occupations with the degree, (2) that learning in the arts and sciences and in a field of specialization leads to understanding and empowerment, and (3) they review their personal plans and recognize that they can effectively meet their most important goals for a bachelor’s degree through the BIS. 

The University of North Carolina at Pembroke, like every other college accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, requires that all its academic programs have an approved balance among general education, one or more fields of specialization, and electives.  The BIS is no exception.  BIS students are required to meet the university’s general education core requirements and are involved in middle and upper level classes combined into a varied array of interdisciplinary program majors. 

The BIS is not designed for persons needing to receive specific state or national certification in a professional field—for example, teaching, nursing, or computer science—or wishing preparation in pursuit of a graduate degree. 

 

BIS Completion Requirements

The Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies degree may be earned upon completion of the following requirements: 

 

1.       Meet The University of North Carolina at Pembroke’s general education core requirements.

2.       Hold an Associate in Applied Arts or an Associate in Applied Science degree from a two year institution.

3.       Complete a course of study in a specific Interdisciplinary Studies Major (listed below) of between 36 and 56 semester hours (SH) with an earned average grade point of 2.0 or better for the courses taken.  At least 30 SH must be taken from one or more Academic Departments at The University of North Carolina at Pembroke (UNCP).  Only 60 SH may be transferred from a two year institution. The number of SH permitted from any department, school, or college of UNCP will be restricted by discipline specific accreditation standards.

4.       Transfer or take a balance of elective or support courses to meet the total credit requirements of 120 hours.

5.       And all other requirements for baccalaureate graduation at The University of North Carolina at Pembroke.

6.       Two thirds of all Major and Track courses taken toward the BIS degree must be from UNCP.

 

Students and advisors should pay careful attention to the general education courses in each Interdisciplinary Studies major, as well as any courses in the core and tracks which have prerequisites.  Prerequisites cannot be taken concurrently with the courses for which they are prerequisites.

The Interdisciplinary Studies program is no different than any other program in the UNCP catalog when it comes to credit for experiential learning.  In other words, college credit in lieu of lifelong learning/experiential learning will not be granted.

Majors within the BIS degree program contain cores of 21 to 33 credit hours to which are attached 15 to 29 hours of approved electives, most often bundled as tracks.  Students also may elect to attach one or more minors to these majors to fulfill University electives.

               

 

B.I.S. IN APPLIED PROFESSIONAL STUDIES

 

 

Requirements for a Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies Degree: Major in Applied Professional Studies

Sem. Hrs.

General Education Requirements, including:

ECN 1000 Economics of Social Issues

ECN 2030 Principles of Macroeconomics

ENG 1050 Composition I

ENG 1060 Composition II

MAT 1070 College Algebra

MAT 2100  Statistics I

PED 1010  Wellness and Fitness

PSPA 1010  Introduction to American National Government

44

Core Requirements:

ACC 2270  Financial Accounting

ACC 2280  Managerial Accounting

DSC 1090 Business Uses of Computers

DSC 2090 Spreadsheet and Database Management

ENG 3580  Professional Writing

FIN 3100  Business Finance

And 3 additional hours from the following:

ECN 2020 Principles of Microeconomics

MGT 3060  Organization & Management

MKT 3120  Principles of Marketing

21

Track (Choose one of the seven tracks below):

Advertising:

MCM 2100 Intro to Mass Communication

MCM 2400 Writing for the Media

PRE 2700 Intro to Advertising

MKT 3200 Consumer Behavior

And 3 additional hours from the following:

BRD 3130 Broadcast Copywriting

PRE 4150 Advertising Media

(also recommended: ART 2500 Communication Design, BRD 4160 Broadcast Advertising and Sales)

Community Recreation: 

REC 3000  Introduction to Community Recreation

REC 3320  Recreation Programming

REC 4000  Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation

REC 4160 Outdoor Recreation Service

REC 4400  Tourism & Commercial Recreation

Economic Development: 

ECN 4080  Economic Development

PSPA 3310  Public Finance

SOC 3180  Community Development

SOC 4250  Organizations in Society 

SOC 4420  Community Resource Development

Health Promotion: 

HLTH 2000  Principles of Health & Fitness Promotion

HLTH 3300  Health Promotion & Fitness Skills

HLTH 4100 Health and Fitness Behavior Changes

HLTH 4700  Planning, Administration, Evaluation of Program

SOC 3120  Sport and Contemporary Society

(Additional recommended course: HLTH 1090  Healthful Living)

International:

MKT 3130  International Marketing (or MGT 3150  International Management)

PSPA 3220   International Political Economy

PSPA 3810   International Law

SOC 3160  Development & Globalization

SOC 3180  Community Development

Office Administration: 

MCM 2100  Introduction to Mass Communication

MGT 3090  Organizational Leadership (or MGT 4080  Human Resource Management)

PRE 2200  Public Relations

PRE 3500  Organizational Communications

And 3 additional hours from the following:

SOC 4250 Organizations in Society

SOC 4400 Conflict Management

Theatre:

MKT 4300 Integrated Marketing Communications

SOC 4400  Conflict Management

THE 2500  Introduction to Theatre

THE 3530  Theatre Management

THE 4210  Performing Arts Administration

15

Electives

40

 

Total: 120

 

 

B.I.S. IN APPLIED INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

 

 

Requirements for a Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies Degree: Major in Applied Information Technology

Sem. Hrs.

General Education Requirements, including:

ENG 1050 Composition I

ENG 1060 Composition II

MAT 1070 College Algebra

44

Core Requirements:

CSC 1750 Introduction to Algorithms

CSC 1760 Introduction to Programming

CSC 2050  Introduction to Programming  C

DSC 1090 Business Uses of Computers

DSC 2090 Spreadsheet and Database Management

ENG 3580  Professional Writing

MGT 3060  Organization & Management

ITM 3010  Management Information Systems

ITM 3500  Database Management Systems

SOC 2200  Computers and Society

30

Track:

Operations Management: 

DSC 3130 Business Statistics I

DSC 3140  Business Statistics II

ITM 4400  Project Management

MGT 4410  Operations Management

SOC 4400  Conflict Management

15

Electives

31

 

Total: 120

 

 

B.I.S. IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

 

 

Requirements for a Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies Degree: Major in Criminal Justice

Sem. Hrs.

General Education Requirements, including:

For all Tracks:

MAT 1050 Introduction to College Mathematics

SOC 1020 Introduction to Sociology

For the Forensics Track only:

BIO 1000 Principles of Biology

CHM 1300 General Chemistry I

CHM 1310 General Chemistry II

PSY 1010 Introductory Psychology

44

Core Requirements:

CRJ 2000  Introduction to Criminal Justice

CRJ 2400  Criminology

CRJ 2500  Basic Criminal Law

CRJ 3000 Advanced Criminal Law

CRJ 3600  Social Statistics

CRJ 3610  Social Research

CRJ 4000  Criminal Procedure

CRJS 4XXX  Special Topics in Criminal Justice

And 3 additional hours from the following:

CRJ 4150* Police Community Relations

CRJ 4250 Terrorism

CRJ 4350 Death Penalty.

*Students who take this course must also take CRJ 2100, which will add 3 credit hours to their program.

27

Tracks (Choose one of the three tracks below):

Applied Information Technology: 

DSC 1090  Business Uses of Computers

DSC 2090 Spreadsheet and Database Management

MGT 3060 Organization and Management 

ITM 3010 Management Information Systems

ITM 3500 Database Management Systems

ITM 4400 Project Management

ITM 4600 Systems Security, Reliability, & Privacy

Forensics:

BIO 3180  Principles of Genetics      

BIO 3710  Cell Biology

BIOL 1000 Principles of Biology Lab

BTEC 3220  Biotechnology I

CHM 1100 General Chemistry Laboratory I

CHM 1110 General Chemistry Laboratory II

CHM 2500 Organic Chemistry I

CHM 3110/3120  Biochemistry I  & Experimental Methods in Biochemistry

MAT 1070 College Algebra 

PSY 3600  Abnormal Psychology (or  SOC 3780   Sociology of Drug Use)

(Additional Recommended Courses:  BIO 1020  General Zoology and CHM 2270  Analytical Chemistry)

Sociology: 

SOC 2090  Social Problems in Modern Society

SOC 3030  The Family

SOC 3130 The Community

SOC 3140 Collective Behavior and Social Movements

SOC 3210  Social Inequalities

SOC 3680  Law & Society

SOC 4400  Conflict Management

21-29

Electives

20-28

 

Total: 120

 

 

B.I.S. IN CULTURAL STUDIES

 

 

Requirements for a Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies Degree: Major in Cultural Studies

Sem. Hrs.

General Education Requirements, including:

AIS 1010  Introduction to American Indian Studies

ART 2080 Survey of Art I: Ancient through Medieval

HST 1150  World Civilizations II

SOC 1050 Cultural Anthropology

44

Core Requirements:

AIS 4050 Contemporary Issues of American Indians

ART 3100  Non-western Art

ECN 2020 Principles of Microeconomics

ECN 2030 Principles of Macroeconomics

ECN 4060  Comparative Economic Systems

HST 4270  Modern European Cultural History

HSTS 4240 American Popular Culture

SWK 3820 African American Populations

(Additional recommended courses: AIS 1100 History of the American Indian to 1865; AIS 1110 History of the American Indian Since 1865; AIS 2010 American Indian Cultures; AIS 2130 American Indian Religious Traditions; AIS 2310  Race, Culture, and the Lumbee Experience; AIS 3600 History and Culture of the Lumbee; ART 2090 Survey of Art II: Renaissance through Contemporary; ART 4260 Art of the United States; ART 4270 North American Indian Art; AST 2010  An Introduction to American Studies; ENG 2010 Southern Literature; ENG 2050 Word Literature Before 1660; ENG 2060 World Literature After 1660; ENG 2100 African American Literature; ENG 2190 Latino Literature; ENG 2200 Native American Literature; ENG 4850  Cultural Issues of English as a Second Language; HST 1140  World Civilizations I; HSTS 4360 The Civil Rights Movement; MCM 3660 Media and Culture; MUS 2930  The World of Music:  Classical to the Contemporary Era; MUS 2940 The World of Music:  Antiquity to the Baroque Era; PHI 2050 Social and Political Philosophy; PSYS 3020 Cross-cultural Child Development; SOC 2650 Popular Culture)

24

Track:

Spanish:

SPN 2310* and 2320* Intermediate Spanish I & II; or SPN 2330* Spanish for Heritage Speakers plus 3 additional hours from the elective list below

SPN 3110 Spanish Composition and Review of Grammar

SPN 3120 Spanish Conversation

And 6 additional hours from the following:  SPN 3210 Survey of Spanish-American Literature I, SPN 3220 Survey of Spanish-American Literature II, SPN 3310 Survey of Literature of Spain I, SPN 3320 Survey of Literature of Spain II, SPN 3610 Civilization and Culture of Spanish America, SPN 3620 Civilization and Culture of Spain, SPN 3700 Advanced Grammar and Composition, SPN 3710 Business Spanish, or SPN 4510 Study Abroad

*Students who are not placed into one of the intermediate Spanish courses based on testing or evaluation by UNCP’s Spanish Coordinator must take the beginning SPN 1310/1320 sequence, which will add 6 credit hours to their program.

18

Electives

34

 

Total: 120

 

 

B.I.S. IN FAMILY STUDIES

 

 

Requirements for a Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies Degree: Major in Family Studies

Sem. Hrs.

General Education Requirements, including:

BIO 1030 Basic Human Biology

PSY 1010 Introductory Psychology

SOC 1020 Introduction to Sociology

44

Core Requirements: 

ECE 3600  Parent and Child Advocacy/Networking

EDN 3100  Birth through Young Adult Development

FIN 2050 Personal Finance

SOC 3030 The Family

SOC 3540  Gender and Society

SOC 4530 Family Violence

SWK 3700 Practice with Children and Adolescents

SWK 3840 Gerontological Social Work

(Additional recommended courses:   AIS 2010  American Indian Cultures; PSY 1030 Psychology of Parenthood; SED 3000  Introduction to Exceptional, Diverse, and At-Risk Students; SOC 2450  Human Diversity and Social Environment; SOC 3600 or SWK 3600 Statistics; SWK 2000 Introduction to Social Work; ENG 3700 Advanced Composition or ENG 3580 Professional Writing)

24

Track:

Spanish:

SPN 2310* and 2320* Intermediate Spanish I & II; or SPN 2330* Spanish for Heritage Speakers plus 3 additional hours from the elective list below

SPN 3110 Spanish Composition and Review of Grammar

SPN 3120 Spanish Conversation

And 6 additional hours from the following:  SPN 3210 Survey of Spanish-American Literature I, SPN 3220 Survey of Spanish-American Literature II, SPN 3310 Survey of Literature of Spain I, SPN 3320 Survey of Literature of Spain II, SPN 3610 Civilization and Culture of Spanish America, SPN 3620 Civilization and Culture of Spain, SPN 3700 Advanced Grammar and Composition, SPN 3710 Business Spanish, or SPN 4510 Study Abroad

*Students who are not placed into one of the intermediate Spanish courses based on testing or evaluation by UNCP’s Spanish Coordinator must take the beginning SPN 1310/1320 sequence, which will add 6 credit hours to their program.

18

Electives

34

 

Total: 120

 

 

B.I.S. IN HISPANIC COMMERCE

 

 

Requirements for a Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies Degree: Major in Hispanic Commerce

Sem. Hrs.

General Education Requirements, including:  

ECN 2030 Principles of Macroeconomics

ENG 1050 Composition I

ENG 1060 Composition II

SPN 1310/1320* Elementary Spanish I & II and/or SPN 2310/2320* Intermediate Spanish I & II

*If a student must take both beginning and both intermediate Spanish courses to satisfy prerequisites to the Core Requirement Spanish courses, then only 6 hours of Spanish credits may be applied to meeting General Education requirements and any remaining Spanish credit will count as Electives.

44

Core Requirements:

DSC 1090 Business Uses of Computers

DSC 2090 Spreadsheet and Database Management

ENG 3580  Professional Writing

FIN 2050  Personal Finance

HST 3860  Latin America since Independence

ITM 3010  Management Information Systems

MGT 3060  Organization & Management

MKT 3120  Principles of Marketing

SPN 3110 Spanish Composition and Review of Grammar

SPN 3120 Spanish Conversation

SPN 3710  Business Spanish

33

Track:

Community Emphasis:

MKT 3200  Consumer Behavior

MKT 4200  Personal Selling and Sales Management

SOC 3180  Community Development

SOC 3210  Social Inequalities

SOC 3240  Sociology of Poverty

SOC 3680 Law and Society

21

Electives

22

 

Total: 120

 

 

B.I.S. IN HOSPITALITY

 

 

Requirements for a Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies Degree: Major in Hospitality

Sem. Hrs.

General Education Requirements,  including:

ECN 2020  Principles of Microeconomics

ENG 1050 Composition I

ENG 1060 Composition II

PSY 1010  General Psychology

MAT 2100  Statistics I

44

Core Requirements:

ENG 3580  Professional Writing

MGT 3060  Organization & Management

MGT 4080  Human Resource Management

MKT 3120  Principles of Marketing

MKT 3200  Consumer Behavior

MKT 4300  Integrated Marketing Communications

PSY 2700  Industrial/Organizational Psychology

SPE 2000  Interpersonal Communication

24

Track:

Hotel and Restaurant Administration

HLTH 2060  Nutrition

MGT 3090  Organizational Leadership

MKT 4200  Personal Selling and Sales Management

REC 4400  Tourism and Commercial Recreation

SOC 4400  Conflict Management

SWK 2450  Human Diversity and Social Environment

16

Electives

36

 

Total: 120

 

 

B.I.S. IN PUBLIC AND NON-PROFIT ADMINISTRATION

 

 

Requirements for a Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies Degree: Major in Public and Non-Profit Administration

Sem. Hrs.

General Education Requirements, including:

ART 2050  Art Appreciation

ECN 1000 Economics of Social Issues

PSPA 1000 Introduction to Political Science

PSY 1010  Introductory Psychology

SOC 1020 Introduction to Sociology

 (Students interested in the Spanish Track or taking Spanish courses under the General Track who are not placed into one of the intermediate Spanish courses based upon testing or evaluation by UNCP’s Spanish Coordinator must also take the beginning SPN 1310/1320 Spanish sequence.)

44

Core Requirements:

MGT 3060 Organization and Management                                     

SWK 3480 Social Welfare Policies and Programs I                        

SWK 4030 Supervision in Human Service Organizations

SOC 2090 Social Problems in Modern Society

SOC 4180 Voluntary Associations and Non-Profit Organizations 

SOC 4420 Community Resource Development 

SOC 4850 Internship or PSPA 3640 Practicum in Public Admin. (6 hrs.)

(Additional recommended courses:  ENG 3700 Advanced Composition or ENG 3580 Professional Writing, and ENG 4090-4129  Special Topics in Composition and Rhetoric)

24

Tracks (Choose one of the five tracks below):

General: (18 hours from the following list of courses without other specific Track; at least 12 hrs must be at the 3000-4000 level)

ACC 2270 Financial Accounting

ACC 2280 Managerial Accounting

ACC 4500 Governmental and Not-for-Profit Accounting,

AIS 4020 Federal Policy and the American Indian

AIS 4600 American Indian Health

ECN 3300* Public Finance

ECN 4080* Economic Development

ENV 4100 Environmental Laws and Regulations

MGT 3090 Organizational Leadership

MGT 4070 Organizational Theory

MGT 4080 Human Resource Management

MCM 2100 Introduction to Mass Communication

MCM 3600 Media and Culture

PHI 2040 Introduction to Ethics

PHI 4430 Business Ethics

PRE 2200 Public Relations

PRE 3500 Organizational Communications

PSPA 2100 Introduction to Public Administration

PSPA 3010* Political Parties and Interest Groups in the United States

PSPA 3800 International Organizations

PSY 2160 Social Psychology

PSY 2700 Industrial/Organizational Psychology

PSY 3160 Psychology of Leadership

SOC 3010 Community Health Organizations and Services

SOC 3180 Community Development

SOC 3210 Social Inequalities

SOC 3790 Substance Abuse Prevention

SOC 4250 Organizations in Society

SPN 2310 Intermediate Spanish I or SPN 2320 Intermediate Spanish II or  SPN 3120 Spanish Conversation

SPE 3580 Discussion and Debate

SWK 3830.Child Welfare Services

*Students who take this course must also take additional prerequisites, which will add credit hours to their program.

Accountancy:

ACC 2270 Financial Accounting

ACC 2280 Managerial Accounting

ACC 3210 Intermediate Accounting I

ACC 3220 Intermediate Accounting II

ACC 4500 Governmental and Not-for-Profit Accounting

And 3 hours from the General-No Emphasis List (above)

Communications:

SPE 2000 Interpersonal Communication

SPE 2010 Fundamentals of Speech

MCM 2100 Introduction to Mass Communication

PRE 2200 Public Relations

And 6 additional hours from the following: 

MGT 3030 Business Communication, BRD 3130* Broadcasting Copywriting, SPE 3580 Discussion and Debate, PRE 3500 Organizational Communications, or ENG 3250 Language in Society.

*Students who take this course must also take MCM 2400, which will add 3 credit hours to their program.

Public Management:

ECN 3300 (or PSPA 3310) Public Finance

PSPA 1010 Introduction to American National Government

PSPA 2330 Introduction to Theory and Methodology

PSPA 3010 Political Parties and Interest Groups in the United States

PSPA 3020 Administration of Municipal Government in the United States

Spanish:

SPN 2310* and 2320* Intermediate Spanish I & II; or SPN 2330* Spanish for Heritage Speakers plus 3 additional hours from the elective list below

SPN 3110 Spanish Composition and Review of Grammar

SPN 3120 Spanish Conversation

And 6 additional hours from the following:  SPN 3210 Survey of Spanish-American Literature I, SPN 3220 Survey of Spanish-American Literature II, SPN 3310 Survey of Literature of Spain I, SPN 3320 Survey of Literature of Spain II, SPN 3610 Civilization and Culture of Spanish America, SPN 3620 Civilization and Culture of Spain, SPN 3700 Advanced Grammar and Composition, SPN 3710 Business Spanish, or SPN 4510 Study Abroad

*Students who are not placed into one of the intermediate Spanish courses based on testing or evaluation by UNCP’s Spanish Coordinator must take the beginning SPN 1310/1320 sequence, which will add 6 credit hours to their program.

18

Electives

34-37

 

Total: 120

 

 

TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS

 

The University offers teacher licensure programs through the School of Education and secondary licensure programs through departments in the College of Arts and Sciences.

For a description of the Teacher Education program and its requirements and policies, see the School of Education section.

 

The Teacher Education Program at UNCP is a cross-disciplinary program, governed by the Teacher Education Committee and administered by the Dean of the School of Education.  General information about admission to the Teacher Education Program, policies and procedures, licensure and testing requirements, special programs, and resources appears in the School of Education section of this catalog.  Please note that some licensure areas or majors are housed in the School of Education and some are housed in their respective academic departments in the College of Arts and Sciences.  If you are looking for information about a specific program area, refer to the chart below to find out where it is housed and the name of the program coordinator.

 

Undergraduate Licensure Program Area

Location

Program Coordinator

Biology Education (secondary 9-12)

Dept. of Biology

Ms. Rachel McBroom

English Education (secondary 9-12)

Dept. of English and Theatre

Dr. Virginia P. Jones

Mathematics Education (secondary 9-12)

Dept. of Mathematics and Computer Science

Dr. Mary Klinikowski

Science Education (secondary 9-12)

Dept. of Biology

Ms. Rachel McBroom

Social Studies Education (secondary 9-12)

Dept. of History

Dr. Jeffrey Lucas

Art Education (K-12)

Dept. of Art

Dr. Tulla Lightfoot

Music Education (K-12)

Dept. of Music

Dr. Gary Wright

Physical Education (K-12)

Dept. of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation

Dr. Tommy Thompson

Special Education (K-12)

Dept. of Professional Education Programs

TBA

Birth to Kindergarten (B-K)

Dept. of Professional Education Programs

Dr. Karen Stanley

Elementary Education (K-6)

Dept. of Professional Education Programs

Dr. Swannee Dickson

Middle Grades Education (6-9)

Dept. of Professional Studies, Middle Grades, and M.A.T.

Dr. Nancy Cerezo

Spanish Education (K-12)

Dept. of Foreign Languages

Dr. José O. Gómez

 

 

SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAMS

 

TEACHING FELLOWS PROGRAM

Director: Karen Granger

The University of North Carolina at Pembroke is one of the fourteen institutions participating in the North Carolina Teaching Fellows Program.  See the School of Education for a description of this program.

 

COLLEGE OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM

Director: Deana Johnson

Robin Oswald

 

The College Opportunity Program is designed to admit a limited number of students who meet most, but not all, of The University of North Carolina at Pembroke’s regular admission standards. Students are selected on the basis of high school academic record, scholastic standing in the high school graduating class, and SAT or ACT scores. The application for admission should be filed as early as possible.

 Students enter the College Opportunity Program in the summer for a five‑week session, which includes freshman testing and courses designed to develop academic skills which will be necessary for the Fall Semester.   Students who successfully complete these summer courses are then eligible to continue in the Fall Semester. In the Fall and Spring Semesters, the student is allowed to register for 15 hours of academic courses. In addition, students meet regularly with the COP advisor for academic counseling.   Students who meet the University’s academic eligibility requirements and have successfully completed the College Opportunity Program (made a “C” or better in both ENG 1050 and ENG 1060) then continue at the University as other regularly admitted students. 

 

CAREER DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

Director: Denisha Sanders

This program, offered by the Career Center, is designed for students at all academic levels and in all majors. The purpose of the program is to assist students in developing the skills required for successful, lifelong career planning. 

 

COURSE (CAR)

CAR 1010.  Introduction to Career Development

Students are exposed to all aspects of the career planning process, including self-assessment, decision-making related to choosing a major and identifying related career options, goal setting, career and job research, and job search tools and strategies.  Credit, 2 semester hours.

 

ENTREPRENEURSHIP CERTIFICATE PROGRAM

Director: Michael Menefee

 

The Entrepreneurship Certificate Program (ECP) provides UNCP students in good standing from all majors the opportunity to learn how to start and manage their own businesses.  The ECP consists of five courses (15 hours) in a 2-2-1 format.  The first course (ENTR 2000) in the program covers business start-ups.  The second course (ENTR 2100) covers business sustainability.  The next two designated courses are from the major field of the student, of 3000 or higher level, with departmental approval and determined before the student matriculates in this program.  The last course (ENTR 4000) helps the student create a comprehensive business plan.  An entrepreneurship certificate will be granted after the successful completion of the program provided the student has a "C" average in the major courses and a "C" average in the Entrepreneurship courses.

 

Requirements for an Entrepreneurship Certificate

Sem. Hrs.

Required ENTR Courses:  ENTR 2000, 2100, 4000

9

Other Required Courses:  Two 3000- or higher-level courses in the student’s major field, with departmental approval

6

 

Total: 15

 

COURSES (ENTR)

See the School of Business for course description.

 

   

INTERDISCIPLINARY MAJORS AND MINORS

 

AMERICAN STUDIES MAJOR and MINOR

Coordinator: Ryan K. Anderson

 

American Studies is an academic discipline concerned with the diversity of the American experience; it is a liberal arts program designed to provide students with an opportunity for multidisciplinary study of the culture of the United States through a variety of perspectives, including history, art, music, literature, film, ethnic studies, and gender studies.  Having a cultural studies focus, the program examines America through forms of expression and through its major social, economic, and political structures, both in the past and the present. 

See the Department of History for a complete description of this program. 

 

 

SCIENCE EDUCATION MAJOR

Coordinator:  Rachel McBroom

 

See the Department of Biology for a description of this interdisciplinary program for teacher preparation, which offers teaching concentrations in Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, or Physics. 

 

AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES MINOR

Coordinator: Frederick H. Stephens

 

The Departments of Social Work; English, Theatre, and Languages; Geology and Geography; History; and Political Science and Public Administration offer a multidisciplinary minor in African American Studies. This program is designed to introduce the student to the knowledge base of African American contributions to American society and to provide a theoretical approach to understanding African American culture.  The student interested in this multidisciplinary minor will have the opportunity to conduct research in areas of African American Studies.

 

Requirements for an African American Studies Minor

Sem Hrs.

Guided Electives: Students must take 18 hours from the courses below, selecting courses from at least three different areas (i.e., SWK, ENG, GGY, HST, PSPA).*

 

Area 1: Sociology, Social Work, and Criminal Justice

SWK 3820/SOC 3820 African American Populations

 

Area 2: Literature

ENG 2100 African American Literature; ENG 3100 The Harlem Renaissance; ENGS 2xxx (relevant topics only); ENGS 4xxx as AASS 4xxx (relevant topics only)

 

Area 3:  Geography

GGYS 4xxx as AASS 4xxx (relevant topics only)

 

Area 4:  History

HST 3610 as AAS 3610; HST 3620 as AAS 3620; HST 3750 as AAS 3750; HST 4020 as AAS 4020 (relevant topics only); HSTS 4xxx as AASS 4xxx (relevant topics only)

 

Area 5:  Political Science

PSPA 3750 as AAS 3750; PSPS 3000-3100 as AASS 3000-3100  (relevant topics only); PSPA 3980 as AAS 3980 (relevant topics only); PSPA 4200 as AAS 4200 (relevant topics only); PSPA 4300 as AAS 4300

 

 

Total: 18

*Permission of the African American Studies Coordinator is required before any topics course may be used to meet the requirements for the minor in African American Studies.

 

APPLIED GERONTOLOGY MINOR

Coordinators: Stephen M. Marson with the assistance of David Dran

 

The Programs in Biology, Nursing, Recreation, Sociology, and Social Work offer an interdisciplinary Minor in Applied Gerontology. The Minor is designed to enhance the student’s knowledge base in gerontology for both personal growth and professional advancement. The Minor offers the student understanding of causal linkages between the changes in biological functioning and their psychosocial adaptations. The minor also addresses the manner in which one can effectively deal with the changes of aging while still maintaining a productive life.  Any course that is offered by the Southeastern Gerontology Consortium [SGC] is automatically approved for the Minor.   For more information about the SGC, see http://www.uncp.edu/gerontology.

In order to successfully complete the Minor in Applied Gerontology, the student is required to enroll in a field practicum within his/her major. The internship must be completed under the auspices of an institution or agency whose primary function is related to the elderly population.

 

Requirements for an Applied Gerontology Minor

Sem. Hrs.

Select 17 hours from the following:  BIO 1030 or PED 3490 (3), SWK 2700 (2), NUR 3300 (3), PSY 3050 (3), REC 4250 (3), SOC 3750 (3), SWK 3840 (3), and any course with the GERS designation sponsored by the Southeastern Gerontology Consortium

 

Complete a field practicum in an agency that serves the elderly population

 

 

Total: 17

 

 

BRITISH STUDIES MINOR

Coordinator: Charles Beem

 

The Departments of History; English, Theatre, and Languages; and Philosophy and Religion offer a minor in British Studies. This program is designed to provide an interdisciplinary curriculum for History majors pursuing an emphasis in British history and English majors specializing in British literature, to broaden their understanding of the cultural, social, and political evolution of Great Britain.

 

Requirements for a Minor in British Studies

Sem. Hrs.

Core Requirements

HST 2140; ENG 2470 or 2480

6

Guided Electives:  Four courses from at least two different departments, with a minimum of three 3000- or 4000-level courses

History:  HST 4170, 4410, 4420, 4430, 4510**

English:  ENG 2470*, 2480*, 3110, 3120, 3150, 3160, 3420, 4510, 4570; ENGS 2xxx***, 33xx***, 4xxx***

Philosophy and Religion:  PHI 2040

(Other courses focusing on Britain may be approved by the program coordinator.)

12

 

Total: 18

*if not used as a core course

**when offered as a British history topic

***when offered as a British literature topic

 

 

Entrepreneurship Minor

Coordinator: Michael Menefee

 

The minor in entrepreneurship provides students the opportunity to learn how to start and manage their own businesses.  The minor consists of six courses (18 hours).  The first two courses in the minor cover business start-up (ENTR 2000) and sustainability (ENTR 2100).  The next three courses focus on marketing (MKT 3120), finance (FIN 2100), and law (BLAW 2150).  The last course (ENTR 4000) in strategy helps the student create a comprehensive business plan.

 

Requirements for an Entrepreneurship Minor

Sem. Hrs.

Required Courses:  ENTR 2000, 2100, 4000, BLAW 2150, MKT 3120, FIN 2100

18

 

Total: 18

 

 

GENDER STUDIES MINOR 

Coordinators: E. Brooke Kelly and Rasby Marlene Powell

See the Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice for a description of this interdisciplinary program.

 

 

MEDIA INTEGRATION STUDIES MINOR

Coordinator: John Labadie

 

Media Integration Studies (MIS) is an opportunity for interdisciplinary study in digital studios within three academic departments: Art, Mass Communication, and Music. Projects and assignments emphasize various aspects of applied information technologies (IT) often termed multimedia. Instruction in the use of both hardware and software emphasizes the following areas: still digital image-making, digital photography, computer-based printing, digital audio recording and editing, MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface), digital animation, and digital videography and editing. Additional courses for the MIS minor are offered by the departments of English, Philosophy, and Sociology and Criminal Justice. Students involved in the MIS minor thus have the opportunity to study, across six academic departments, both the practice of multimedia as well as the effects of such media on the individual, on society, and in the arts.

 

Requirements for a Media Integration Studies Minor

Sem. Hrs.

Required Courses:  ART 2020, ART/BRD/MUS 3800, 4580, 4800

12

Electives:  Choose 2 courses from PHI 1020, MCM 2100, SOC 2220, ENG 2900, ART 2500, BRD 2800, MUS 3580

6

 

Total: 18

 

 

PERSONNEL AND ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP MINOR

Coordinator:  Ed Powers

 

The Departments of Psychology and Counseling and Political Science and Public Administration and the School of Business offer an interdepartmental minor in Personnel and Organizational Leadership. This program is designed to provide the following competencies: 1) a theoretical understanding of the basic psychological processes that operate in work settings; 2) skill in establishing rapport with co‑workers; 3) skill in assessing the qualifications and performance of others; 4) skill in managing and training others; and 5) a theoretical understanding of organizational structure and the forces that influence it.

Students majoring in any subject are eligible to participate in the Personnel and Organizational Leadership minor.  Those who are interested should consult with the department chair from Psychology and Counseling or Political Science and Public Administration or Management, Marketing, and International Business. Since many courses in the minor have prerequisites that can be taken to meet General Education requirements, early planning will be to the student’s advantage.

 

Requirements for a Minor in Personnel and Organizational Leadership

Sem Hrs.

Psychology: select 3 courses from the following

PSY 2160, 3160, 3170, 4030, 4150

9

Management/Administration: select 3 courses from the following

MGT 3060, 3090, 4080, 4660; ECN 4070; PSPA 2100, 3190, 3600

9

 

Total: 18

 

A particular course cannot be used to satisfy the requirements of both a major and a minor at the same time.  

 

SUBSTANCE ABUSE MINOR

Coordinators: Norman Layne and Sherry Edwards

 

A 19‑20 semester hour undergraduate minor in substance abuse is available to undergraduate students from any major. Students interested in obtaining jobs in substance abuse will find that completion of this minor will enhance their marketability with regard to entry‑level jobs. Further, for those students interested in working toward North Carolina Substance Abuse Certification, the Coordinators will provide guidance and assistance that will facilitate the achievement of Certification in North Carolina.

 

Requirements for a Minor in Substance Abuse

Sem. Hrs.

Required Courses: SAB/CRJ 2830 or SWK 3800, SAB 3770, SAB 4550, SOC 3780 or SAB 4610

12

Elective Courses: Select 8‑9 hours from the following: 

CRJ/SOC 3670, CRJ/SWK 3500, SAB/SWK 2700, SOC 2090, SOC 3030, SOC/SWK 2450, SOC 3790

8-9

 

Total:  20‑21

 

COURSES (SAB)

SAB 2700.  Medical Terminology (SWK 2700)

Students are introduced to the most frequently used medical terms and abbreviations. Intended primarily for students in social behavioral science curricula who seek careers in medical organizations.  Credit, 2 semester hours.

SAB 2830.  Interviewing Skills (CRJ 2830)

This course teaches practical skills and the theories behind them for interviewing and recording of interviews in legally and emotionally sensitive areas, such as knowledge about criminal conduct and victimization, child, domestic and substance abuse.  Systems theory is applied to the selection of techniques to be used in different interviewing circumstances, recognizing such critical status distinctions as victim, witness, or suspect.  The course employs lecture, discussion, readings, interviewing assignments, simulations, role-playing, audio-visual taping, and documentation exercises.  Credit, 3 semester hours.

SAB 3770.  Drug Use and Abuse (HLTH 3770)

A study of the types and functions of pharmaceutical treatments. Drug addiction is analyzed as a social, psychological, and biological process. Credit, 3 semester hours.  Prerequisite:  SOC 2010 or permission of instructor.

SAB 4550.  Treatment of Alcohol and Drug Addiction (SWK 4550)

Substance abuse treatment and rehabilitation involving individual clients, families, and groups is addressed. Modalities of treatment, treatment planning, case management, and managed care in addictions are also addressed. Credit, 3 semester hours.

SAB 4610.  Addiction and Women (SOC 4610)

An analysis of women’s experiences of addiction, the societal response to female addiction, and the treatment resources and services that are needed to prevent and treat female addiction. Topics covered include the centrality of relationships in women’s lives, sexual abuse and addiction, addiction and traditional gender roles, and parenting issues for substance abusing women. Credit, 3 semester hours.

 

WORLD STUDIES MINOR

Coordinator: Elizabeth Normandy

 

Eighteen semester hours are required for the satisfactory completion of the minor in World Studies. Courses that fulfill the requirements of the student’s major area of study cannot be applied toward this minor. The minor is divided into specified and elective courses.

 

Requirements for a Minor in World Studies

Sem. Hrs.

World Studies:  select two courses from WLS 2000, 2510, and 4500

 

Elective Courses: select four with coordinator (see below)

 

 

Total: 18

 

COURSES (WLS)

WLS 1000, 1010, 1020, 1030.  University Convocation Program

The World Studies Committee offers four one‑hour courses to encourage student attendance at campus lectures and cultural events. Each course is given on a Pass/Fail basis. To receive credit, students must attend ten events which have been approved by the World Studies Committee. Credit, 1 semester hour.

WLS 2000.  World Cultural Geography (GGY 2000)

Concept of culture applied to the human environment. Geographical variations and evolution resulting from the interaction between cultural and physical processes. Culture and technological change. Population and migration. Cultural effects on perception of the environment. Credit, 3 semester hours.

WLS 2100. Multicultural Center Internship

This internship will provide students with a deeper understanding of cultural relations and the administration of a cultural center.  Students may be assigned research on a cultural topic and will be required to submit papers as well as prepare a related exhibit for public display.  Credit, 3 semester hours, PREREQ: Approval of World Studies Minor Coordinator and the Director of the Multicultural Center.

WLS 2510.  Introduction to World Politics (PSPA 2510)

This course gives students a basic understanding of the major issues and aspects of world politics.  It includes an overview of trends in world politics in the twenty-first century, considers the relevant global actors, explores the relevance of non-state actors, and focuses on the increasing importance of issues relating to global welfare.  A central premise is that world politics is a combination of political, historical, economic, and sociological factors which are not static.  Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: PSPA 1000 or 1010.

WLS 3200. Service Internship

This internship is designed to provide credit for those students (especially volunteers) who provide service to other cultures abroad, but could also be applied to service to groups of foreigners domestically.  Students will be required to submit a substantive report regarding this experience.  Credit, 1 to 3 semester hours PREREQ:  Approval of World Studies Minor Coordinator and the Director of the Multicultural Center.

WLS 3300. Study Abroad

Students who successfully study abroad for a trip lasting a minimum of one week and a maximum of two semesters in a University-approved program will be required to prepare a substantive report regarding their experiences while abroad or report on a particular point of interest they may have researched while in a foreign country.  Credit, 1 to 7 semester hours, PREREQ: Approval of World Studies Minor Coordinator and the Director of the Multicultural Center.

WLS 4500.  Seminar in International and Intercultural Relations

Research seminar to gain experience in formulating, designing, and implementing meaningful research projects in international and intercultural relations. A substantial paper will be prepared by the student and presented to the Seminar and World Studies faculty. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: Approval of World Studies Minor Coordinator.

ELECTIVE COURSES (Select four)

Courses must be selected by the student, approved by the Coordinator, and noted in the minor advisement file of the student. A minimum of 12 unduplicated semester hours will be chosen. Participating departments include:

 

Biology

History

Management, Marketing, and International Business

Philosophy and Religion

Geology and Geography (Geography)

Political Science and Public Administration

Foreign Languages

Sociology, Social Work, and Criminal Justice

 

HEALTH PROFESSIONS PROGRAMS

In addition to the Bachelor of Science in Nursing, described in the College of Arts and Sciences section, the Departments of Biology and Chemistry and Physics provide curricula which meet the requirements for admission into most schools of medicine, dentistry, veterinary science, and medical technology.  In addition, students wishing to pursue a degree in a variety of other health related professions such as pharmacy, optometry, physical therapy, etc., can obtain some of the required college preparation (generally two years) at UNC Pembroke prior to transfer to the appropriate professional school.  In each case, admission to the professional school is competitive, and completion of the prescribed curriculum at UNCP does not guarantee such admission. Because entrance requirements vary with the profession and with individual schools, it is the responsibility of the student to be familiar with the requirements of the specific school to which he or she plans to apply. Advice or assistance can be obtained from the Health Careers Counselor, or from any biology or chemistry faculty member.

 

PRE‑HEALTH CURRICULA AND DEGREE PROGRAMS THAT LEAD TO THE HEALTH PROFESSIONS

 

Curricula

Degree Programs

Pre‑Medical, Pre‑Dental, Pre‑Pharmacy, Pre‑Medical Research, Pre-Veterinary Medicine, Pre‑Medical Technology, Pre‑Optometry, Pre‑Nursing, Pre‑Public Health, Pre-Allied Health

B.S. Biology, B.S. Chemistry,
B.S. Applied Physics, B.S. Psychology,
B.S. Mathematics, B.S. Nursing

 

 

PREPROFESSIONAL CURRICULA IN MEDICINE

Although a B.S. degree is technically not a prerequisite for these programs, the large majority of students who apply and are accepted do hold an undergraduate degree. It is therefore recommended that students interested in these areas pursue a B.S. degree. The Departments of Biology and Chemistry and Physics offer B.S. programs with biomedical emphasis that enable a student to meet requirements for most professional schools. These programs are detailed in the program descriptions of the Departments of Biology and Chemistry and Physics.

 

ACCELERATED PROGRAM IN MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY

UNCP offers a program to its biology majors in affiliation with hospitals approved by the Council on Medical Education of the American Medical Association which gives, by the board of registry of Medical Technologists, a medical technology certificate. In this program the students complete six semesters of on‑campus study and one year of study and training in an affiliated hospital. After satisfactory completion of the fourth year (hospital training), UNCP will award the B.S. degree in biology to the students. Contract renewal is pending; details of the medical technology program are available from the Department of Biology.

Currently, the Biology Department has formal affiliation with McLeod Regional Medical Center in Florence, S.C.  Dr. Vera C. Hyman, M.D., and Ms. Vicki Anderson, M.T., the program director and the education director at McLeod Medical Center, are regarded as adjunct professor and lecturer respectively at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke.  Although the affiliation agreement does provide UNCP students some preference in the admissions process, it should be noted that admission to the hospital program is competitive and that the admissions process is a function of the hospital program.

It should be noted that this is an accelerated program which allows the student to complete in four years a program that often requires five years. Students may elect the alternate route in which a B.S. degree in biology (biomedical emphasis) is obtained before application to a hospital program. Students electing this route are eligible to apply to any school of medical technology and are not limited to programs affiliated with The University of North Carolina at Pembroke.

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