2013-14 CATALOG

ENGLISH, THEATRE, AND FOREIGN LANGUAGES

Chair: Virginia K. McClanahan8

Faculty: Raquel Alfaro, Kathryn Allen, Michael J. Berntsen, Mary Jean Braun, Monika Brown, Mark Canada1, Susan Cannata, Youngsuk Chae, Polina Chemishanova3, Teagan E. Decker5, Katherine V. Denton, Michele Fazio, Denise Feikema6, Jan M. Gane, Anita R. Guynn, Holden Hansen, Steven Hedgpeth, Thomas C. Heffernan, James Helgeson, Karen Helgeson, Brian Scott Hicks, Eun Hee Jeon, Deana Johnson2, Chester I. Jordan4, Brigitte Knight, Roger A. Ladd7, Ana Cecilia Lara13, Walter E. Lewallen, David Marquard, Dennis A. McGlothin, Cynthia Miecznikowski, Wendy P. Miller10, Manuel Modesto, Frank Myers, Sara Oswald, Catherine Parisian, Holly K. Payne, Jesse Peters, Jessica Pitchford9, Enrique J. Porrúa, Therese Rizzo, Melissa Schaub12, Dennis H. Sigmon, Natalie Smith, Robin L. Snead, Charles Tita11, Gary Tremblay, David Underwood, Richard R. Vela

1Dean, College of Arts and Sciences

2Director of College Opportunity Program

3Director of Composition

4Director of Theatre

5 Director of University Writing Center

 6Coordinator of Undergraduate English Education

7Director of Graduate English Education

8 Coordinator of Speech

9Editor of Pembroke Magazine

10 Assistant Chair

11Director, Continuing and Distance Education

12Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment

13Coordinator of Foreign Languages and Spanish Licensure

The Department of English, Theatre, and Foreign Languages educates students and serves the region and the academy through teaching and research in the liberal arts.  The Department cultivates insightful readers, articulate writers and speakers, expressive performers, and critical thinkers.  Department faculty work to improve literacy, to develop innovative pedagogy, to enhance and showcase creative work, and to expand and transmit disciplinary knowledge.

Through sustained development of students’ critical thinking, reading, and writing, the General Education composition sequence lays the foundation for future success.  Offerings in literature, foreign languages, and performance broaden and enrich students’ perspectives. Graduates of our programs become successful as professionals, graduate students, citizens, leaders, and life-long learners in a diverse global community. 

The Department offers majors in English, English Education, Spanish, and Theatre and related minors and concentrations.  Undergraduate majors prepare students for North Carolina Teacher Licensure in Secondary English, Middle Grades Language Arts 6-9, Spanish K-12, and add-on licensure in English as a Second Language.   Graduate Programs in English prepare students for advanced licensure and other professional endeavors.

The Department offers distinctive, realistically conceived, and well‑executed programs for (1) the English major; (2) the student seeking North Carolina Teacher Licensure in English, Secondary Education 9‑12 (program approved by NCTE), Middle Grades Language Arts Education 6-9, Spanish Licensure K-12, or ESL Add-On Licensure; (3) the Theatre major; (4) the Spanish major; (5) the General Education student, served by a strong Composition program and a wide choice of courses; (6) the Education major seeking an academic concentration in English, Spanish, or Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL); (7) the student majoring in another subject who wishes to develop a minor in an area of English, foreign languages, or theatre or simply to choose an elective or two; and (8) the in‑service teacher, or college graduate with a background in English or a related discipline, seeking post‑graduate work in English Education.  The Department recognizes that each program has a distinctive philosophy and specific objectives, which are made clear to students involved in each program.

The Department office offers information about advisement and screening procedures for English majors, teacher licensure candidates in English and Spanish, Spanish majors, and Theatre majors.  Also available is information about the academic concentrations in English, Spanish, and TESL and minors in Creative Writing, English, French, Literature, Spanish, Speech, TESOL, Theatre, and Rhetoric and Professional Writing. These are offered to all students enrolled at the University. 

Pembroke Magazine, housed in the Department and founded in 1969 by the late Norman Macleod while he was at UNC Pembroke, focuses on North Carolina, national, and international writers.  It publishes both beginning and established writers.

The University Theatre, a performance program housed in the Givens Performing Arts Center, provides a practical laboratory for the theoretical and artistic components of the Theatre Program of the Department.

The Department recommends that all of its majors study a foreign language throughout their college careers; six semester hours (or equivalent competency) are required for English, English Education, and Middle Grades Language Arts majors.

A grade of C (2.0) in ENG 1050 (Composition I) is prerequisite to all literature and language courses at the 2000 level and above except for THE 2500 (Introduction to Theatre).  All full‑time students enroll in Composition I during their first semester of full‑time study and continue consecutively thereafter until they successfully complete both ENG 1050 and ENG 1060.

 

ENGLISH

Requirements for a Bachelor of Arts Degree in English

Sem. Hrs.

Freshman Seminar

1

General Education Program*

44

Required Courses:

ENG 3040; ENG 2050 or 2060; ENG 2230 or 2240; ENG 2470 or 2480; ENG 4570; ENGS 4xxx (numbers vary); SPE 2000 or 2010; competency in a foreign language at the 1320 course level**

21-27

Additional Required Course Work—Six courses from those listed below:

ENG 2010 or 2020 or 2080 or 2090 or 2100 or 2180 or 2190 or 2200 or 2410; ENG 3100; ENG 3110; ENG 3120; ENG 3130; ENG 3140; ENG 3150; ENG 3160; ENG 3170; ENG 3250; ENG 33x0; ENG 3420; ENG 3430; ENG 3440; ENG 3460; ENG 3470; ENG 3540; ENG 3560; ENG 3660; ENG 3670; ENG 3680; ENG 3710; ENG 3740 or 3750; ENG 3900; ENG 4020; ENG 4230, 4240; ENG 4810 or 4830 or 4850; no more than two of the following: ENG 2990, 3570, 3580, 3590, 3700, 4250, and ENGS 4090-4129

18

General Electives*

32‑38

 

Total:  122

 

*Students planning to major in English should consult with the department chair prior to registering for General Education courses.  Students planning to seek a teaching license for secondary English Education or middle grades Language Arts Education should meet immediately with the coordinator for English Education to help plan their program.  Up to 38 elective hours are available to students who take General Education courses that meet program requirements. Students planning to seek a teaching license for secondary English Education must use 32 elective hours to meet program requirements below.

**The foreign language requirement may be met by completing 1310 and 1320, by testing into and completing 1320 only, or by testing out of both 1310 and 1320.

 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ENGLISH

SECONDARY EDUCATION 9-12 CONCENTRATION and
MIDDLE GRADES LANGUAGE ARTS EDUCATION 6-9 CONCENTRATION

Coordinator: Denise Feikema

 Upon successful completion of the program of study in English Education and related requirements, graduates are eligible for a Standard Professional I license to teach in the State of North Carolina.  For a more detailed description, including the program standards and goals and objectives, turn to Undergraduate Licensure Programs in the School of Education section of this catalog.

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS—Secondary Education 9-12 Concentration

Sem. Hrs.

Freshman Seminar and General Education

45 (36)

Essential Standards (9 semester hours of Foreign Language and 2000-level Literature may count toward General Ed)

40-46

I. Core Requirements: ENG 3040; ENG 2050 or 2060; ENG 2230 or 2240; ENG 2470 or 2480; ENG 4570; ENGS 4xxx (numbers vary); SPE 2000 or 2010; competency in a foreign language at the 1320 course level**

 

II. Additional Required Courses: ENG 2990; ENG 3460; ENG 3710; three additional courses from ENG 2010 or 2020 or 2080 or 2090 or 2100 or 2180 or 2190 or 2200 or 2410; ENG 3100; ENG 3110; ENG 3120; ENG 3130; ENG 3140; ENG 3150; ENG 3160; ENG 3170; ENG 3250; ENGS 33xx; ENG 3420; ENG 3430; ENG 3440; ENG 3470; ENG 3540; ENG 3560; ENG 3660; ENG 3670; ENG 3680; ENG 3740 or 3750; ENG 4020; ENG 4230, 4240; ENG 4810 or 4830 or 4850; ENG 3570 or 3580 or 3590 or 3700 or 4250 or ENGS 4090-4129

 

Select one: JRN 1820 or 1610 or THE 1620 or ENG 2860

 

Professional Studies Core

9

EPC 2020, 2040, 3010, 3030

 

Content Pedagogy

21

EED 3840 (spring only), 3890 (fall only), 4490 (spring only), 4750 (spring only); CSC 4050 (after EED 3840)

 

General Electives

7-13

 

Total:   122

 

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS—Middle Grades Language Arts Education 6-9 Concentration

Sem. Hrs.

Freshman Seminar and General Education

45 (42)

Essential Standards (3 semester hours of 2000-level Literature may count toward General Ed)

30

I. Core Requirements: ENG 3040; ENG 2050 or 2060; ENG 2230 or 2240; ENG 2470 or 2480; ENG 3460; ENG 3710; one additional course from ENG 2010 or 2020 or 2080 or 2090 or 2100 or 2180 or 2190 or 2200 or 2410

 

II. Additional Required Courses: Select three of the following literature courses: ENG 3100, 3110, 3120, 3130, 3140, 3150, 3160, 3170, 3250, 3420, 3430, 3440, 3470, 3540, 3560, 3660, 3670, 3680, or ENGS 33xx; or 2 literature courses from the previous list plus SPE 2000 or SPE 2010 or SPE 3580 or THE 2010

 

Second Academic Concentration

18-30

Professional Studies Core

12

EPC 2020, 2040, 3010, 3030; EDN 3400

 

Content Pedagogy

21

EED 3840 (spring only), 3890 (fall only), 4490 (spring only), 4750 (spring only); CSC 4050 (after EED 3840)

 

 

Total: 123*

*may be greater depending on Second Academic Concentration

 

NOTE:  Students who desire teacher licensure in Secondary English/Middle Grades Language Arts Education should declare the major as soon as possible in their college career. Consultation with the Program Coordinator or program advisor prior to registering for General Education courses is strongly recommended.

 

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE ADD-ON LICENSURE

Students can take the 6 courses (18 hours) in the program for either undergraduate or graduate credit and, upon completion of the program, can add on to either the “A” or “M” license. All courses will be offered in the late afternoon or evening, and the program can be completed within two years.

 

Course Requirements—ESL Add-On Licensure

Sem. Hrs.

ENG 3460, 3710, 4810, 4830, 4850; TESL 4890

18

 

ENGLISH:  THEATRE ARTS

Students who major in Theatre Arts are required to participate in the University Theatre, a performance program housed in the Givens Performing Arts Center, which provides a practical laboratory for the theoretical and artistic components of the Theatre Program of the Department.

Requirements for B.A. Degree in English: Theatre Arts

Sem. Hrs.

Freshman Seminar

1

General Education Program

44

Major Requirements

 

Core Major Courses: ENG 2470; ENG 3540; ENG 4570

9

THE 2010, 2330, 2350, 2500, 3310, 3530, 3600, 3610; THE 1620, 1640;

Two courses from THE 1650, 2340, 3330, 3340;

Four courses from four Theatre Practicum areas, THE 2020-2080, and three additional courses from THE 2020-2100, up to 3 of which may be for acting;

THE 4020

43

Twelve hours of major courses from  SPE 2000 or 2010; THE 1650, 1810, 1820, 2070, 2340, 3010, 3040, 3310, 3330, 3340, 4010, 4530, 4540; THES 3xxx; MUS 1121, 1641, 2430, 2440; MUSP 1001-3001

12

Electives

11

 

Total: 120

       

 

SPANISH

Requirements for a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Spanish

Sem. Hrs.

Freshman Seminar

1

General Education Program

44

Required Prerequisite Courses: SPN 2310 and 2320 or SPN 2330

6

Pronunciation Proficiency—May be met with a P grade in SPN 2990 or through Pronunciation Proficiency Validation by Department Chair.

Required Courses: SPN 3110, 3120, 3150, 3200, 3700

 

 

15

Spanish Electives—Seven courses from those listed below (at least one literature course at the 4000 level is required):
SPN 3210, 3220, 3310, 3320, 3360, 3510, 3610, 3620, 3710, 4130, 4140, 4150, 4230, 4240, 4250, 4550, 4700, SPNS 4xxx

 21

General Electives

34

 

Total:  121

 

TEACHER LICENSURE IN SPANISH (K-12)

Coordinator: Ana Cecilia Lara

Students seeking North Carolina Teacher Licensure in Spanish, grades K-12, complete all of the B.A. in Spanish degree requirements; they also complete the licensure requirements described below as part of the 34 hours of General Electives.  Upon successful completion of this program of study and related requirements, graduates are eligible for a Standard Professional I license to teach in the State of North Carolina.  For a more detailed description, including the program standards and goals and objectives, turn to Undergraduate Licensure Programs in the School of Education section of this catalog.

Licensure Requirements in Spanish (K-12)

Sem. Hrs.

Professional Studies Core

EDN 2100, 3130, 3150, SED 3310

12

Content Pedagogy

SPN 3010, 4400, 4480, 4490; CSC 4050

19

 

Total:  31

 

 

ACADEMIC CONCENTRATIONS IN ENGLISH, SPANISH, AND TEACHING ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (TESL)

For students seeking a baccalaureate degree in Elementary Education, Special Education, or Physical Education, the Department offers Academic Concentrations in English and Spanish of 24 hours and an Academic Concentration in Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL) of 18 hours. These Academic Concentrations are available to other students, regardless of major.

Requirements for an Academic Concentration in English

Sem. Hrs.

1. Core Courses

a. ENG 3040

b. SPE 2000 or 2010

6

2. Three 2000-level literature courses, one from each of the three areas in 2.c-2.e:

c. ENG 2230 or 2240

d. ENG 2470 or 2480

e. any 2000-level literature course not taken under 2.c and 2.d: choose from ENG 2010, 2020, 2030, 2050, 2060, 2080, 2090, 2100, 2180, 2190, 2200, 2230, 2240, 2410, 2470, 2480; ENGS 2xxx

9

3. One 2000/3000‑level language/writing course: choose from ENG 2780, 2790, 3460, 3700, 3710

3

4. Two 3000/4000-level courses not taken under 3 above: choose from ENG 3100, ENG 3110; ENG 3120; ENG 3130; ENG 3140; ENG 3150; ENG 3160; ENG 3170; ENG 3250; ENGS 33xx; ENG 3420; ENG 3430; ENG 3440; ENG 3460; ENG 3470; ENG 3540; ENG 3560; ENG 3660; ENG 3670; ENG 3680; ENG 3700; ENG 3710; ENG 4570; ENGS 4xxx (numbers vary)

6

 

Total: 24

                    

 

Requirements for an Academic Concentration in Spanish

Sem. Hrs.

1. Required Courses

SPN 2310 and 2320 or SPN 2330; 3110 and 3120; 3150 and 3200

18

2. Elective Courses: choose two courses (including at least one 4000-level course) from the following:

SPN 3210, 3220, 3310, 3320, 3360, 3510, 3610, 3620, 3700, 3710, 4210, 4220, 4550, 4700, 4710, 4730

 6

 

Total: 24

 

 

Requirements for an Academic Concentration in Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL)

Sem. Hrs.

ENG 3460, ENG 3710, ENG 4810, ENG 4830, ENG 4850, TESL 4890

18

 

Total: 18

 

MINOR PROGRAMS

Each Department Minor consists of 18 hours selected from courses listed below as Options for the Minor Program. 

-Six of these hours may be duplicated (count also for another program requirement).

-At least 6 of the 12 unduplicated hours must come from 3000‑ or 4000‑level courses.  See Department Chair for more information.

 

Options for a Minor in Creative Writing

Required:  ENG 3040; Choose three Creative Writing courses from the following: ENG 2780, 2790, 3740, 3750, 4260, ENGS 37xx; Options for 6 additional hours (cannot duplicate courses taken to fulfill Creative Writing requirement): ENG 2780, 2790, 2860, 2870, 3540, 3560, 3660, 3670, 3680, 3710, 3740, 3750, 3860, 3870, 4260, 4860, 4870, ENGS 37xx

Options for a Minor in English

Required:  ENG 3040; Options for 15 additional hours: ENG 2010, 2020, 2030, 2050, 2060, 2080, 2090, 2100, 2180, 2190, 2200, 2230, 2240, 2410, 2470, 2480, 2780, 2790, 2990, 3100, 3110, 3120, 3130, 3140, 3150, 3160, 3170, 3250, 3420, 3430, 3440, 3460, 3470, 3540, 3560, 3570, 3580, 3590, 3660, 3670, 3680, 3700, 3710, 3740, 3750, 3900, 4020, 4230, 4240, 4250, 4260, 4500, 4570, 4810, 4830, 4850, 4890; ENGS 2xxx, 33xx, 4xxx, 4090-4129

Options for a Minor in Literature

Required:  ENG 3040; Options for 15 additional hours: ENG 2010, 2020, 2030, 2050, 2060, 2080, 2090, 2100, 2180, 2190, 2200, 2230, 2240, 2410, 2470, 2480, 3100, 3110, 3120, 3130, 3140, 3150, 3160, 3170, 3420, 3430, 3440, 3470, 3540, 3560, 3660, 3670, 3680, 3900, 4020, 4500, 4570; ENGS 2xxx, 33xx, 4xxx

Options for a Minor in Speech

SPE 1020, 2000, 2010, 3580; ENG 3250, 4810; THE 2010

Options for a Minor in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)

ENG 3250, 3460, 3710, 4810, 4830, 4850; TESL 4890; EDN 4080

Options for a Minor in Theatre:

Required courses: THE 1620, 2010, 2500; two courses from THE 2020-2080 as advised (9 hours); Choose one course from the following Technical Theatre section: THE 2330, 2340, 3330, or 3340 (3 hours); Choose one course from the following Business/History section: THE 3530, 3600, or 3610 (3 hours); Electives—Choose 5 hours from the following: THE 1640, 1650, 1810, 1820, 2070, 2340, 2350, 3010, 3040, 3310, 3330, 3530, 3600, 3610, 4010, 4210; THES 3xxx

Options for a Minor in Rhetoric and Professional Writing

Required: ENG 2450 and ENG 3580; Options for 12 additional hours: ENG 2990, 3570, 3650, 3710, 3720, 4210, 4250; ENGS 4090-4129 

Options for a Minor in British Studies

Refer to the History Department section of the catalog for a description of this program.

Options for a Minor in French

FRN 1320, 2310, 2320; FRN 2550, 2560; FRN 3210, 3220; FRN 3610; FRN 4510

Options for a Minor in Spanish

Required: SPN 2310 and 2320 or SPN 2330; SPN 3110 and 3120; Options for 6 additional hours: SPN 3150, 3200, 3210, 3220, 3310, 3320, 3360, 3510, 3610, 3620, 3700, 3710

Options for a Minor in Hispanic Studies

Refer to the Special Programs and Interdisciplinary Programs section of the catalog for a description of this program.

 

 

COURSES

ENGLISH (ENG, TESL)

§NOTE:  Students may satisfy the General Education Humanities Literature requirement by completing any one of the fifteen English courses marked with § in the course listing that follows.  Each of these courses includes critical and analytical reading, application of critical terminology and critical approaches, study of formal features of multiple genres, research about literary texts, and ways to appreciate the value of literature.

ENG 0104.  Written Communication Skills

Introduces students to academic ways of reading, writing, and thinking. Students cultivate reading and writing strategies in order to understand, paraphrase, and summarize, producing several short texts.  Credit, 3 semester hours (will not count toward earned hours or graduation requirements). Required for students placed into ENG 0104 and for students in the College Opportunity Program. NOTE:  Must receive “C” grade or better to progress into ENG 1050.

ENG 1020.  Laboratory in Writing I

In a writing laboratory environment designed to support ENG 1050, students will participate in activities and small group workshops in the practice of written communication and composition. Credit, 1 semester hour.  May be repeated once for credit for a maximum of 2 semester hours. PREREQ: permission of instructor.

ENG 1030. Laboratory in Writing II

In a writing laboratory environment designed to support ENG 1060, students will participate in activities and small group workshops in the practice of written communication and composition. Credit, 1 semester hour. May be repeated once for credit for a maximum of 2 semester hours. PREREQ: Permission of instructor.

ENG 1050.  Composition I

Provides students with a foundation in critical reading and writing practices by introducing different types of texts and ways of working with them; students will recognize and interpret differing perspectives and will analyze and synthesize others’ work, producing several texts of moderate length. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: Placement into ENG 1050 or “C” grade or better in ENG 0104.

ENG 1060.  Composition II

Builds upon the critical reading and writing practices developed in ENG 1050 and focuses on research principles and practices. Students will locate and evaluate sources; negotiate differing perspectives;  synthesize and integrate sources ethically; arrive at a claim through logical reasoning; and argue the claim in rhetorically effective forms, producing several sophisticated texts.  Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: “C” grade or better in ENG 1050.

ENG 1910.  Spelling

A review of major spelling rules in English, with special attention to particular words that often give difficulty. Attention to techniques to aid memorization of particular problem words. Credit, 1 semester hour.

ENG 1920.  Vocabulary Building

A study of methods of vocabulary enrichment (such as association by sound, appearance, meaning, and knowledge of common root, prefix/suffix meanings). Specific words are studied. Credit, 1 semester hour.

ENG 1930.  Pronunciation

An intensive course to improve students’ competence and confidence in oral use of language. Word attack skills and specific problem words included. Credit, 1 semester hour.

ENG 1940.  English Usage

Intensive review of parts of speech and their use in the sentence. Study of punctuation forms. Analysis of verb problems and errors that obscure meaning or distract readers.  Credit, 1 semester hour.

ENG 1950.  Sentence Mastery

Practice in imitating various sentence structures to add variety and impact to writing.  Credit, 1 semester hour.

ENG 1960.  Punctuation

Study of specific punctuation rules and their application, with particular emphasis on commas, semicolons, and apostrophes.  Credit, 1 semester hour.

§ENG 2010.  Southern Literature

A survey of literature by writers from the Southern part of the United States.  Readings may include novels, short fiction, and poetry by authors such as Faulkner, O’Connor, Welty, Hurston, and McCarthy. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: “C” grade or better in ENG 1050.

§ENG 2020.  Contemporary Literature

A survey of literature from 1945 to the present, introducing students to trends and major developments in fiction, poetry, and drama.  Authors may include Ginsberg, Atwood, Beckett, Stoppard, Walcott, Mahfouz, Oe, and Fuentes. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: “C” grade or better in ENG 1050.

§ENG 2030.  Literary Genres

Study of basic structure or elements of the various genres of literature including poetry, prose fiction, and drama. Readings include works of major British, American, and world literature authors. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: “C” grade or better in ENG 1050.

§ENG 2050.  World Literature Before 1660

A survey of western and non-western literature from the beginnings through the Renaissance considered within the cultural epochs of their creation, including the Classical Period, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance.  Readings may include Gilgamesh, The Ramayana, and selections from authors such as Homer, Ovid, Confucius, Dante, Montaigne, and Cervantes. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: “C” grade or better in ENG 1050.

§ENG 2060. World Literature After 1660

A survey of western and non-western literature from the Enlightenment through the Twentieth Century considered within the cultural epochs of their creation, including the Enlightenment, Romanticism, Realism, Modernism, and the contemporary world.  Authors may include Moliere, Goethe, Kafka, Camus, Achebe, and Garcia Marquez. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: “C” grade or better in ENG 1050.

§ENG 2080.  Women’s Literature

A survey of literature written by women of diverse periods and backgrounds, introducing students to a variety of genres and trends in women’s literature.  Authors may include Wollstonecraft, Fuller, Woolf, Brooks, Rich, Kingston, and Kincaid. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ:    “C” grade or better in ENG 1050.

§ENG 2090.  Literature and Film

A survey of the relationships between literary texts and films with emphasis on film adaptations; includes methods of analysis, discussion of theory, process, reception, and the cultural contexts of the works considered. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: “C” grade or better in ENG 1050.

§ENG 2100.  African American Literature

A survey of African American literature, introducing students to genres, trends, and major periods of African American literature, ranging from 18th- and 19th-century autobiographies and narratives to 20th-century works.  Authors may include Douglass, Morrison, Wright, and Toomer. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: “C” grade or better in ENG 1050.

§ENG 2180.  Asian American Literature

A survey of literature written by Asian American writers introducing a variety of genres and trends in Asian American literature. Readings include short stories, novels, plays, and critical essays produced by Asian American writers, and discussions examine the formation of Asian American subjectivities within socioeconomic, cultural, and political contexts.  Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: "C" grade or better in ENG 1050.

§ENG 2190.  Latino Literature

A survey of literature by writers of Latin American heritage writing in English. This course examines the experience and dilemmas of Mexicans, Cubans, Puerto Ricans, Dominicans, and other established and immigrant US Hispanic/Latino groups by studying recent writers and filmmakers, including an examination of the media images of Latinos. Topics include essentialism, biculturalism, marginality, transculturation, and acculturation.  Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: “C” grade or better in ENG 1050.

§ENG 2200.  Native American Literature (AIS 2200)

A survey of literature produced by Native Americans.  The course will cover fiction and poetry, and close attention will be paid to historical contexts and themes central to the understanding of Native American literature.  Authors may include Momaday, Silko, Hogan, Vizenor, Welch, and Erdrich. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: “C” grade or better in ENG 1050.

§ENG 2230.  American Literature Before 1865

A survey of notable authors and literary movements from the period preceding and including the Civil War.  Readings may include nonfiction, poetry, short fiction, and at least one novel.  Authors may include Bradstreet, Poe, Emerson, Douglass, and Dickinson. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: “C” grade or better in ENG 1050.

§ENG 2240.  American Literature Since 1865

A survey of notable authors and literary movements between the end of the Civil War and the present.  Readings may include nonfiction, poetry, drama, short fiction, and at least one novel.  Authors may include Twain, Chopin, Faulkner, Hughes, and Walker. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ:  “C” grade or better in ENG 1050.

§ENG 2410.  Environmental Literature (AIS 2410)

Survey of Indigenous and multinational environmental literature and its relationship to race, class, gender, sexuality, and/or dis/ability, attentive to local human and ecological communities. Variety of authors and genres.  Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: “C” grade or better in ENG 1050.

ENG 2450.  Introduction to Rhetoric

Study of principles fundamental to persuasion and argument, including audience, purpose, rhetorical situation, genre, rhetorical appeals, commonplaces, and methods of reasoning. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: "C" or better in ENG 1050 and 1060. 

§ENG 2470.  British Literature Before 1790

A survey of British literature from the Anglo-Saxon through the Neo-Classical in several genres.  Readings may include Beowulf and works by authors such as Chaucer, More, Spenser, Shakespeare, Jonson, Milton, Swift, Defoe, and Behn. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: “C” grade or better in ENG 1050.

§ENG 2480.  British Literature After 1790

A survey of British literature from the Romantics to the contemporary, including Colonial and Post-Colonial literatures in several genres.  Authors may include Blake, Wordsworth, Shelley, the Brontes, Hopkins, Yeats, Joyce, Pinter, Amis, Coetze, Rushdie, and Naipaul. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: “C” grade or better in ENG 1050.

ENG 2780.  Writing Poetry I

An introduction to the principles and techniques of writing poetry.  Workshop format.   Credit, 3 semester hours.

ENG 2790.  Writing Fiction I

An introduction to the principles and techniques of writing fiction.  Workshop format.    Credit, 3 semester hours.

ENG 2860, 2870, 3860, 3870, 4860, 4870.  Literary Magazine Production

This course provides experience in the details of producing a literary publication and in using desktop publishing software through work on the UNCP student literary magazine, The Aurochs.  Activities will include layout design, artwork selection and cropping, editing, typesetting, and general production work.  Pass/Fail grading.    Credit, 1 semester hour each.

ENG 2900.  Film and New Media Criticism

A study of film history and theory focusing on the development of New Media.  Topics include theory in early Russian cinema, avant-garde and surrealist film of the 1920s, cinema vérité of the 1960s, the Dogma 95 group, the uses of digital film, computer-generated imagery (CGI), and a discussion of nonsequential, multilinear, and interactive narratives. The emphasis in the course will be on defining and responding critically to New Media.   Credit, 3 semester hours.

ENG 2990. Writing Center Theory and Practice

An introduction to Writing Center theory and practice using readings, classroom discussion, observation, role-playing, and supervised tutoring practice. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: “C” or better in ENG 1050.

ENG 3040.  Principles of Literary Study

Required of all English majors.  Preparation for the study of literature, including methods of literary research, writing about literature, and overview of literary theories. In a workshop environment, students in each section will read at least one common assigned literary text and will gain an advanced understanding of the conventions of scholarly writing in literary studies. Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ:  “C” or better in ENG 1060 and “C” or better in one 2000-level literature course. Highly recommended during the first term of English major, minor, or concentration study.

ENG 3100.  The Harlem Renaissance

In-depth study of major writers and genres of the Harlem Renaissance in its intellectual, cultural, and historical contexts. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ:  ENG 3040 or permission of the instructor.

ENG 3110.  Medieval British Literature

A critical study of selected British Literature from the Anglo-Saxon period through the early Tudor era.  May include such genres as heroic, courtly, hagiographical, and mystical literature.  Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ:  ENG 3040 or permission of the instructor.

ENG 3120.  Early Modern British Literature

A critical study of British Literature from Skelton to Milton; particular focus on the Elizabethan era.  May include such genres as the lyric, the sonnet sequence, the romantic epic, prose fiction, drama, and poetic theory.   Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ:  ENG 3040 or permission of the instructor.

ENG 3130.  The American Renaissance

A critical study of the literary movements that flourished in America during the mid-nineteenth century. May include a discussion of American Gothicism, Sentimentalism, Romanticism, Realism, Transcendentalism, and Slave Narratives.   Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ:  ENG 3040 or permission of the instructor.

ENG 3140.  American Literature in Transition, 1870-1914

A critical study of American literature from Post-Reconstruction to WWI in relation to social and cultural influences and the struggle for an American literary identity. May include a discussion of Realism, Naturalism, Late Sentimentalism, Regionalism, New (Race) Woman, Imagism, and Modernism.   Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ:  ENG 3040 or permission of the instructor.

ENG 3150.  British Romantic Literature

A critical study of selected literature of the Romantic period in Britain, covering representative authors and texts of fiction, poetry, and nonfiction prose, with an emphasis on poetry.  The course examines Romantic literature in relation to social and cultural contexts, including political theory and revolutions, the Romantic hero, aesthetic and poetic theories, and artistic representations of nature and the imagination.   Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ:  ENG 3040 or permission of the instructor.

ENG 3160.  Victorian Literature

A critical study of selected literature of the Victorian period, covering representative authors and texts of fiction, poetry, and non-fiction prose.  The course examines Victorian literature in relation to social and cultural contexts, including industrialization, social class and social reform, roles of women and children, religion, and science, monarchy and empire, and conditions of literary publication.   Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ:  ENG 3040 or permission of the instructor.

ENG 3170.  Post-Colonial Literature

A critical study of selected literature written in English from regions in the former British empire, such as Africa, the Caribbean, the Indian Subcontinent, and South-East Asia,, covering representative authors and texts of fiction, poetry, and non-fiction prose.  The course examines the literature in relation to historical, cultural, and social contexts especially those concerning British colonialism and the fall of empire in the last century, the establishment of new national identities, and issues such as hybridity, transnationalism, ethnicity and indigeneity, and feminism. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ:  ENG 3040 or permission of the instructor.

ENG 3250.  Language in Society

A sociolinguistic study of language including the nature of variation in language (varieties, dialects, and registers), language and gender, language and culture, and the politics of language.   Credit, 3 semester hours.

ENG 3420.  The British Novel

A critical study of the English novel from the eighteenth century to the present, with emphasis on social history and narrative technique.   Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ: ENG 3040 or permission of instructor; ENG 2470 or ENG 2480 recommended.

ENG 3430.  The American Novel

A critical study of the American novel from its inception to the present, with emphasis on social history and narrative technique.   Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: ENG 3040 or permission of instructor; ENG 2230 or ENG 2240 recommended.

ENG 3440.  The Native American Novel (AIS 3440)

A critical study of the Native American Novel from its inception to the present, with emphasis on social, political, and cultural history.  Particular attention will be paid to the narrative techniques of these authors with a focus on the relationship between oral traditions and the form of the novel.   Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: ENG 3040 or permission of instructor.

ENG 3460.  Aspects of the English Language

An introduction to the English language including applied study of such topics as the history of the language and its acquisition, dialects, semantics, lexicography, phonology, orthography, grammatical systems, and standards of modern English usage. Credit, 3 semester hours.

ENG 3470. Native American Poetry (AIS 3470)

A critical study of Native American poetry and poetics, with emphasis on social, political, cultural, and Native national histories. Particular attention will be paid to the techniques of these authors with a focus on the relationship between oral traditions and contemporary poetry. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: ENG 3040 or permission of instructor.

ENG 3540.  Modern Drama

A study of selections from the drama of the Western world of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Credit, 3 sem. hrs. PREREQ: ENG 3040 or permission of instructor; six semester hours of 2000‑level literature.

ENG 3560.  Modernist Fiction

A critical study of selected works of fiction from the first half of the twentieth century, covering representative authors of the short story, novella, and novel. The course examines modernist fiction in relation to social and cultural contexts, with particular attention to experimentation, the avant garde, and narrative technique.    Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ:  ENG 3040 or permission of instructor.

ENG 3570. History of Rhetoric

Study of the history and theory of rhetoric from classical to modern periods.   Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: “C” or better in ENG 1050 and 1060.

ENG 3580. Professional Writing

Study of the history, theory, and practice of professional and technical writing. Topics might include audience analysis, research methods, visual rhetoric, culture of the workplace, and collaboration. Writing genres might include résumés, application letters, memoranda, proposals, formal reports, manuals, and others.  Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: “C” or better in ENG 1050 and 1060.

ENG 3590. Creative Nonfiction

Reading and writing of creative nonfiction, including memoir, personal essay, biography, and literary journalism.  Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: “C” or better in ENG 2780 or 2790.

ENG 3650.  Writing in Digital Environments

The study of the relation of rhetorical theory to digital writing and web design, focusing on both written and visual awareness when creating and developing digital writing projects. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: “C” or better in ENG 1050 and 1060.

ENG 3660.  Modernist Poetry

A critical study of selected works of poetry from the first half of the twentieth century. The course examines modernist poetry in relation to social and cultural contexts, with particular attention to experimentation and avant-garde poetics.   Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ:  ENG 3040 or permission of instructor.

ENG 3670.  Contemporary Fiction

A critical study of selected works of fiction from post-World War II to the present, covering representative authors of the short story, novella, and novel.  The course examines contemporary fiction in relation to social and cultural contexts, with particular attention to modernism, postmodernism, and narrative technique. Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ:  ENG 3040 or permission of instructor.

ENG 3680.  Contemporary Poetry

A critical study of selected works of poetry from post-World War II to the present, representing the stylistic, thematic, and cultural diversity so apparent in late twentieth-century and early twenty-first-century poetry.  The course examines contemporary poetry in relation to social and cultural contexts, with particular attention to modernism, postmodernism, and new forms and modes of expression. Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ:  ENG 3040 or permission of instructor.

ENG 3700.  Advanced Composition

An upper‑division academic writing course for students majoring in the arts, humanities, and sciences, especially those anticipating graduate level and professional writing demands.   Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: “C” grade or better in ENG 1050 and 1060.

ENG 3710.  English Grammar

A thorough review of traditional grammar, discussions of sentence patterns, transformations, and both old and new diagram forms included. Credit, 3 semester hours.

ENG 3720. Writing for the Public Sphere

An introduction to genres that influence political ideas, including news media, investigative journalism, activist and think tank websites, blogs, letters to editors or lawmakers, and op-eds. Emphasis on analyzing, evaluating, and producing texts for the public sphere, distinguishing between persuasion and propaganda, and exploring the obligations of civic engagement. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: “C” or better in ENG 1050 and 1060. 

ENG 3740.  Writing Poetry II

An advanced workshop in writing poetry, building on fundamentals covered in the introductory course and emphasizing manuscript preparation and submission.    Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ:  ENG 2780 or permission of instructor.

ENG 3750.  Writing Fiction II

An advanced workshop in writing fiction, building on fundamentals covered in the introductory course and emphasizing manuscript preparation and submission.    Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ:  ENG 2790 or permission of instructor.

ENG 3900.  Study Abroad

An international experience designed to cultivate global understandings of literary texts and movements in English, foster deeper understandings of other cultures, and enhance skills of critical thinking and intercultural communication. Credit, 3 semester hours. May be repeated for credit when offered under a different topic. PREREQ: ENG 3040 and/or permission of instructor.

ENG 3990.  Practicum in Composition Tutoring

A supervised practicum of working as a writing assistant in an appropriate University setting or with students from area schools. Credit, 1‑2 semester hours. Maximum, 4 semester hours.

ENG 4020.  Literary Criticism

History of literary criticism and study of postmodern theories of reading such as feminist, Marxist, and reader-response criticism, structuralism, and deconstruction.    Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ:  ENG 3040 or permission of instructor.

ENG 4210. Grant Writing

An introduction to writing grants, including searching for grants, aligning grants with projects, analyzing the rhetoric of grants, conducting research, and producing drafts of grants through collaborative writing, reviewing, and editing. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: “C” or better in ENG 1050 and 1060. 

ENG 4230, 4240.  Special Topics in American English

A study of announced topics in American English. Possible topics include issues in linguistics, grammar, literacy, varieties of English, media and language, Literary Journalism and American English as a global force.  Credit, 3 semester hours.

ENG 4250.  African American Rhetorics

An in-depth study of African American political speeches, letters, sermons, essays, and book-length texts that examines the debates, strategies, styles, and persuasive practices employed by African Americans in dialogue with the larger nation and among themselves. Credit, 3 semester hours.

ENG 4260.  Creative Writing Workshop

This course will normally be taught by visiting writers and may be repeated for credit. Offered when circumstances warrant. Credit, 1‑3 semester hours; maximum 6 semester hours. PREREQ: ENG 3740 or ENG 3750 or permission of Department Chair.

ENG 4500.  Seminar in American Indian Literature (AIS 4500)

A study of selected topics in American Indian literature.  Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: Permission of instructor.

ENG 4550.  Directed Studies Seminar

An independent study project culminating the student’s sequence of studies with a substantive research project resulting in major paper or comparable original work. The project is designed by the student and his/her research director. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: Consent of instructor.

ENG 4570.  Shakespeare

An introduction to the Elizabethan Theatre, a study of Shakespeare’s career as a dramatist, and a critical survey of a number of major plays—histories, comedies, and tragedies. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: ENG 3040 or permission of instructor; ENG 2470 recommended.

ENG 4810.  Phonetics and Phonology

A study of the speech sounds that occur in the languages of the world will cover physiological properties of the speech producing apparatus, phonetic transcription using the international phonetic alphabet, and both theoretical and applied study of phonological patterns. Credit, 3 semester hours.

ENG 4830.  Second Language Acquisition

An in-depth study of both theoretical issues in second language acquisition and the practical application of theory in the ESL classroom, including  learning styles and strategies; the importance of affective factors and socio-cultural factors in language learning; contrastive analysis, interlanguage, and error analysis; and communicative competence.  Credit, 3 semester hours.

ENG 4850.  Cultural Issues of English as a Second Language

A study of important cultural issues relevant to the teaching and learning of English as a second language, including bilingualism, differences in cultural patterns of perception and thinking, differences in what is considered appropriate student behavior and appropriate teacher behavior in a variety of cultures, and cultural differences expressed in verbal and non-verbal behavior.  The importance of understanding and taking into account the cultural backgrounds of students in the teaching of ESL and the importance of teaching American culture as a part of ESL will also be considered.  Credit, 3 semester hours.

TESL 4890.  Applied Pedagogy of Teaching English as a Second Language

Following a review of the pedagogical fundamentals grounded in cognitive, affective, and linguistic principles of second language acquisition, this course will focus on the practical realities of the language classroom, including curriculum development, lesson planning, evaluation of students and programs, and classroom management.  Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ: ENG 3460, 3710, 4810, 4830, 4850.

ENGS 2xxx (Numbers will vary).  Studies in Literature

Study of a specific genre or topic in world literature: its characteristics and significance as both a cultural product and a form of literary expression. Title and topic will vary from year to year.  Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: “C” grade or better in ENG 1050.

ENGS 33xx (Numbers will vary).  Special Topics in Literature

A critical study of a specific literary period, genre, or topic. Title and topic will vary from offering to offering.  Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: ENG 3040 or permission of instructor.

ENGS 37xx (Numbers will vary).  Special Topics in Creative Writing

A creative writing course emphasizing in-depth study of a specific genre or topic.  Workshop format.   Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ:  ENG 2780 or 2790.

ENGS 4090-4129 (Numbers will vary).  Special Topics in Composition and Rhetoric

Intensive study of a theme or issue in composition, rhetoric, or professional writing.  May be repeated as subject matter changes.    Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ: One previous writing course at the 3000 level or above.

ENGS 4xxx (Numbers will vary).  Seminar in Literature

Study in a small group setting of particular figures or topics in British, American, or World Literature. As part of the seminar experience, each student must make presentations, contribute to class discussion, and write an extended essay incorporating library sources.   Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: ENG 3040 or permission of instructor; upper‑division standing in the University.

 

ENGLISH EDUCATION (EED)  For a description of English Education programs, see above or consult the Coordinator of Undergraduate English Education.

EED 3840.  Literature and Reading for Adolescents (6‑12): Methods and Materials

A survey of literature and reading for adolescents, grades 6‑12, incorporating varied methods of approaching and assessing the study of literature and managing the reading program within pluralistic classrooms.  Experiences include classroom presentations in various literary genres, activities appropriate for students with advanced or deficient reading skills, and classroom observations (10 hours).  Credit, 3 semester hrs. PREREQ:  ENG 3040 and admission to the Teacher Education Program.

EED 3890.  The Teaching of Writing and Speech (6‑12): Methods and Materials

Preparation for teaching oral and written communications skills in the middle and secondary schools. Study and application of principles, terminology, materials, and strategies for teaching and assessing writing and speech within an integrated language arts curriculum. Experiences include writing workshops, unit and lesson planning, oral presentations, technology applications, and observing and assisting in the Writing Center and in writing and speech classrooms (15 hours). Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ:  EED 3840, ENG 3040, and admission to the Teacher Education Program.

EED 4020.  Methods of Teaching Dramatic Literature and Performance

Purposes, methods, materials, and evaluation procedures in the area; directed observation in the secondary school; preparation of teaching plans and materials.  Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: THE 3040 recommended.

EED 4490.  Internship for Secondary English Education

Provides relevant intensive full-semester internship experiences in off-campus public school setting or settings  Requires a continuous full-time teaching experience in secondary English.  Pass/Fail grading.   Credit, 9 semester hours.  PREREQ: admission to professional semester.

EED 4750.  Professional Seminar in Secondary English Education

Philosophy of English curricula and purposes of Standard Course of Study; applications in concrete teaching situations of appropriate methods and materials of instruction and assessment procedures; reflection on teaching practice.  Seminar designed to parallel the full-semester internship/teaching experience in English Education (EED 4490).   Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ: admission to professional semester.

 

SPEECH (SPE)

SPE 1020.  Fundamentals of Voice and Diction

Introduction to the fundamentals of voice and diction for the beginning student. The course consists of practical exercises designed to introduce the student to General American Speech. Credit, 3 semester hours.  NOTE:  Upon earning 60 credit hours, a student must either have satisfied the speech requirement through testing, have taken SPE 1020, or be registered for SPE 1020 in the following semester.

SPE 2000.  Interpersonal Communication

Interpersonal communication behaviors that influence interpersonal relationships. Emphasis on developing personal skills and attitudes in one‑to‑one relationships and small groups. Credit, 3 semester hours.

SPE 2010.  Fundamentals of Speech

Study of the principles and skills involved in creating and delivering effective speeches, and preparation and presentation of individual and small group speeches. Credit, 3 semester hours.

SPE 3580.  Discussion and Debate

An exploration of various discussion techniques, including parliamentary procedure, where the essentials of argumentation will be explained and practiced.  Credit, 3 semester hours.

 

THEATRE (THE)

THE 1620.  Theatre Practicum (Introduction)      

An introduction to the practices of theatre production, including the plan and function of the physical facility; safety procedures in the costume shop, scene shop, and on stage; appropriate use of theatre tools, stage rigging, lighting and sound equipment; and other elements of theatrical production. This course will be taught by several members of the theatre faculty.  Credit, 1 semester hour.

THE 1640.  Stage Make‑Up

Theory and practice in the application of make‑up for the stage using practical make‑up application for class exercises. Credit, 1 semester hour.

THE 1650.  Stage Costumes

Principles and theories of costume design and construction for theatrical productions. Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ: THE 1620 or permission of instructor.

THE 1810.  Stage Dance I (PED 1810)

Basic dance technique for the stage. Credit, 1 semester hour. PREREQ:  Permission of instructor.

THE 1820.  Stage Dance II (PED 1820)

Basic dance technique for the stage. Credit, 1 semester hour. PREREQ: Permission of instructor.

THE 2010.  Acting I: Fundamentals

Introduction to fundamental acting concepts, including the understanding of self-expression and understanding dramatic texts in terms of goals, obstacles and action.  Acting processes are explored through classroom exercises and scene work.  Credit, 3 semester hours.

THE 2020. Theatre Practicum (Wardrobe/Makeup Crew)

Participate as a member of wardrobe crew with the possibility of advancement to assignments such as wardrobe or makeup assistant, wardrobe or makeup supervisor, and/or an assistant to the faculty member by serving as assistant costume designer, with appropriate faculty supervision. This is a lab course requiring approximately 40 hours over the semester. May be repeated for up to four credit hours. Credit, 1 semester hour. PREREQ: THE 1620, 1640, 1650, or permission of instructor. 

THE 2040. Theatre Practicum (Production Crew)

Participate as a member of one of the standard stage crews, such as scene shifting, props, light board operator, and/or sound board operator, with the possibility of advancement to assignments such as scenic artist, sound engineer, shop foreman, and/or property master/mistress, with appropriate faculty supervision.  This is a lab course requiring approximately 40 hours over the semester. May be repeated for up to four credit hours. Credit, 1 semester hour. PREREQ: THE 1620 or permission of instructor. 

THE 2060. Theatre Practicum (Lighting Crew)

Participation in light hang/focus and strike, with the possibility of advancement to master electrician, and/or assistant lighting designer, with appropriate faculty supervision.  This is a lab course requiring approximately 40 hours over the semester. May be repeated for up to four credit hours. Credit, 1 semester hour. PREREQ: THE 1620 or permission of instructor. 

THE 2070.  Stage Combat

Introduction to staged violence, armed and unarmed combat. Permission of Instructor required. PREREQ: THE 1810. Credit, 1 semester hour.

THE 2080. Theatre Practicum (Assistant Stage Manager/Stage Manager)

Participation in production as assistant stage manager, with possible advancement to assignments such as Stage Manager, to include assistance with poster design, house management, program layout and design, with appropriate faculty supervision. May be repeated for up to four credit hours. Credit, 1 semester hour. PREREQ: THE 1620 and 2350 or permission of instructor.

THE 2100. Theatre Practicum (Acting)

Participate as a cast member in a University Theatre production. May be repeated for up to three credit hours. Credit, 1 semester hour. PREREQ: BY AUDITION ONLY.

THE 2330.  Stagecraft

Study of theories and techniques used in creating a stage environment. Students will participate in various aspects of production as a practical supplement to classroom lectures. Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ: THE 1620 or 1630.

THE 2340.  Scene Painting

Development of basic and advanced skills in scenic painting techniques through studio projects. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: THE 1620 or 1630.

THE 2350.  Stage Management

Theory and practice of stage management in Broadway, regional, community, and educational theaters. To include the stage manager’s responsibilities during rehearsals as well as during performances. Credit, 1 semester hour.  PREREQ: THE 1620 or 1630.

THE 2500.  Introduction to Theatre

Introduction to both theatre practice and literature; survey of artists of the theatre and dramatic literature from Ancient Greece to the present. Credit, 3 semester hours.

THE 2620, 2630.  Play Production (Crew Participation)

Participate as a member of one of the standard stage crews, such as wardrobe, carpentry, painting, lighting crew, sound crew, properties crew, front-of-house usher/marketing assistant, or running crew, with appropriate faculty supervision.   Credit, 1 semester hour.  PREREQ: THE 1620.

THE 2810.  Stage Dance III

Further development of technical skills in jazz, modern, and other stage dance styles, including  increased movement capabilities, rhythmic accuracy, and spatial  relationships, with emphasis on aesthetic and expressive qualities that lead to performance. Credit, 2 semester hours.  PREREQ: permission of instructor.

THE 2820.  Stage Dance IV

Further development of technical skills in jazz, modern, and other stage dance styles, including  increased movement capabilities, rhythmic accuracy, and spatial  relationships, with emphasis on aesthetic and expressive qualities that lead to performance.  Credit, 2 semester hours.  PREREQ: permission of instructor.

THE 3010.  Acting II: Characterization

Continued development in areas previously explored.  Emphasis on the actor’s instrument, including: appearance, speech and movement capabilities, emotional depths, intelligence, mind-body combination, sense of timing, sense of drama and presentational skills.  These areas are explored through classroom exercises and scene and monologue work.  Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ: THE 2010.

THE 3040.  Creative Drama

Principles and practices of organizing and directing creative drama and children’s theatre activities in the classroom and in the community.   Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: THE 2010 recommended.

THE 3170.  Dialects for the Stage

An overview of regional American and international geographically-specific speech dialects.  A series of written, recorded, and oral assignments will provide students with the ability to master specific dialects for performance on stage or film. Credit, 1 semester hour. PREREQ: THE 2010.

THE 3310.  Play Direction

Study of the theory and practice of directing for the theatre; classroom theory supported by individual experience in selection and analysis of scripts, casting, rehearsal, and production. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: THE 1620/1630; THE 2010 or permission of instructor.

THE 3330.  Lighting

Theories and principles of lighting design for theatrical productions. Conceptualization, communication, and execution of design ideas through script analysis, light studies, light plots, and related projects. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: THE 2330 recommended. PREREQ: THE 1620 or 1630.

THE 3340.  Scene Design

Theory and principles of scene design for the stage. Conceptualization and communication of design ideas through renderings, models, and technical drawings. Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ: THE 1620 or 1630; THE 2330 recommended.

THE 3530.  Theatre Management

Theory and practice of theatre management objectives including: theatre organization, season, budget, schedule, personnel, publicity, box office, and house management.    Credit, 3 semester hours.

THE 3600.  History of the Theatre: The Beginnings to 1642

Study of the theatre, both its physical form and literature from the beginnings to 1642. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: THE 2500 or permission of instructor.

THE 3610.  History of the Theatre: 1642 to the Present

Study of the theatre, both its physical form and literature from 1642 to the present. Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ: THE 2500 or permission of instructor.

THE 3620, 3630.  Play Production (Crew Chief)

Participate as the chief of one of the standard stage crews, such as wardrobe assistant, scenic artist, Master Electrician, Sound Engineer, Assistant Stage Manager, Shop Foreman, Box Office Assistant, or Property Master/Mistress, with appropriate faculty supervision.   Credit, 1 semester hour.  PREREQ: THE 1620.

THE 4010.  Acting III: Styles

Continued development in areas previously explored.  Emphasis on auditioning skills, including: developing initial skill in the understanding of how to audition, cold and prepared readings, period styles and developing initial skill in the understanding and expression of formal/heightened language and movement.  Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: THE 3010.

THE 4020. Senior Capstone

Senior project focusing on student's personal interest in theatre. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: Declared Senior Theatre Major.

THE 4530.  Directed Practicum in Advanced Theatre Problems I

Credit is earned by successful fulfillment of a contractual agreement between the student and a supervising faculty member. Credit, 1‑3 semester hours. PREREQ: Declared junior or senior major, 3.0 grade point average in major, and permission of instructor.

THE 4540.  Directed Practicum in Advanced Theatre Problems II

Credit is earned by successful fulfillment of a contractual agreement between the student and a supervising faculty member. Credit, 1‑3 semester hours. PREREQ: Declared junior or senior major, 3.0 grade point average in major, and permission of instructor.

THE 4620, 4630.  Play Production (Assistant Designer/Director)

Participate as an assistant to the faculty member by serving as Assistant Costume Designer, Wardrobe Supervisor, Assistant Set and/or Lighting and/or Sound Designer, Stage Manager, Assistant Technical Director, Assistant Marketing Director, or Assistant to the Director, with appropriate faculty supervision.   Credit, 1 semester hour.  PREREQ: THE 1620.

THES 3xxx.  Special Topics in Theatre

An in‑depth study of a selected topic in theatre or drama determined by the expertise of the instructor and the interests of the students.  Credit, 1-3 semester hours each. PREREQ: THE 1620 or 1630 or permission of instructor.

FOREIGN LANGUAGES (FRH, GER, ITL, SPN, XXX)

A student presenting two or more units in a high school language course and wishing to continue the study of that language should, after having satisfactorily passed a review of proficiency in the language, register in the course for which the student is qualified.

FRENCH (FRH)

FRH 1310, 1320.  Elementary French I, II

The sequence of 1310‑1320 introduces French grammar and vocabulary and some aspects of French culture. Aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing are stressed in that order. Credit, 3 semester hours.

FRH 2310, 2320.  Intermediate French I, II

Grammar review, translation and composition; oral practice through drill and discussion. An introduction to French civilization and literature.   Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: FRH 1310, 1320 or two units of high school French.

FRH 2550, 2560.  French Conversation and Composition

Intensive practice in aural‑oral French, based on French literature and civilization subject matter; further study of grammar, vocabulary, and idiom; further training in formal and free composition.  Credit, 3 semester hours.

FRH 3210, 3220.  Study of French Literature

Masterpieces of French literature from the beginning to the present as an outgrowth of French history and civilization.  Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: FRH 2310, 2320 or permission of instructor.

FRH 3610.  French Civilization and Culture

A course designed to give students a better understanding of the history and civilization of France and other French‑speaking countries and to increase their knowledge of the general French culture.  Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: FRH 2310 or its equivalent.

FRH 4510.  Study Abroad: Study Tour in France

A trip designed to acquaint students with various aspects of French life and civilization through visits to places of historical and cultural interest.  Credit, 2‑7 semester hours. PREREQ: Consent of instructor.

GERMAN (GER)

GER 1310, 1320.  Elementary German I, II

The sequence of 1310‑1320 introduces German grammar and vocabulary and aspects of German culture. Aural comprehension, speaking, and writing are stressed in that order.  Credit, 3 semester hours.

GER 2310, 2320.  Intermediate German I, II

Grammar review, translation and composition; oral practice through drill and discussion. An introduction to German civilization.  Credit, 3 semester hours each. PREREQ: GER 1310, 1320 or 2 units of high school German.

ITALIAN (ITL)

ITL 1310, 1320.  Elementary Italian I, II

The sequence 1310‑1320 introduces Italian grammar and vocabulary and aspects of Italian culture. Aural comprehension, speaking, and writing are stressed in that order.  Credit, 3 semester hours each.

SPANISH (SPN)

SPN 1310, 1320.  Elementary Spanish I, II

The sequence 1310‑1320 introduces Spanish grammar and vocabulary and some aspects of Spanish culture. Aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing are stressed in that order. Credit, 3 semester hours.

SPN 2310, 2320.  Intermediate Spanish I, II

The sequence 2310‑2320 develops increased competence in aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing and reviews Spanish grammar. Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: SPN 1310, 1320; two units of high school Spanish; or permission of instructor.

SPN 2330.  Spanish for Heritage Speakers

An intensive review of the Spanish language designed for students with extensive cultural background in the target language.  Available to non-native speakers who have an extensive foreign language background.  Credit, 6 semester hours.  PREREQ:  Permission of instructor.

SPN 2990.  Spanish Phonetics and Pronunciation

Students planning to major in Spanish or receive teacher licensure in Spanish will be advised whether they need to take this course, after completing one semester of Spanish.  May be taken up to three times for credit.  Pass/Fail grading.  Credit, 1 semester hour.

SPN 3010.  Early Laboratory Experiences for Prospective Teachers

This course is designed to give prospective Spanish teacher candidates initial exposure to public schools in order to provide them with a realistic preparation for student teaching, challenge their underlying beliefs about teaching and learning, form a basis for a personal decision on teaching Spanish as a career, and build a background for further professional study and growth.  Credit, 1 semester hour.

SPN 3080.  Spanish Education Field Experience

Early field experiences for the Spanish education major providing observation and instructional experiences in a variety of educational settings.  Development of lesson plans and instructional activities in response to the unique features of learning environments.   Credit, 1 semester hour.  PREREQ:  SPN 2320, SPN 2330, or permission of instructor.

SPN 3110.  Spanish Composition and Review of Grammar

Intensive practice in task-oriented compositions and comprehensive review of grammatical forms and usage.    Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ:  SPN 2310 and SPN 2320; SPN 2330; or permission of instructor.

SPN 3120.  Spanish Conversation

Development of oral communication skills.  Emphasis on use of language in everyday situations, vocabulary growth, listening comprehension, and correctness in grammar.   Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ:  SPN 2310 and SPN 2320; SPN 2330; or permission of instructor.

SPN 3150. Analytical Skills and Critical Aspects of Spanish

Students review and extend their knowledge of all basic patterns (e.g., grammar, vocabulary, sociocultural norms) of the language.  They develop their oral and written skills in describing, narrating and presenting arguments.  They are exposed to texts and audio-visual material that provide them with a deeper understanding of the Spanish-speaking world.    Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ: SPN 3110 and SPN 3120; or permission of instructor.

SPN 3200. Literary Analysis and Criticism in Spanish

Through a variety of representative works of Hispanic literature, this course focuses on the discussion and practical application of different approaches to the critical reading of literary texts.  We also study basic concepts and problems of literary theory, as well as strategies for research and academic writing in Spanish.    Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ: SPN 3110, SPN 3120 and SPN 3150; or permission of instructor.

SPN 3210.  Survey of Spanish-American Literature I

Masterpieces of Latin American literature from Colonization to Romanticism as an outgrowth of Latin American history and civilization.  Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: SPN 3200 or permission of instructor.

SPN 3220.  Survey of Spanish-American Literature II

Masterpieces of Latin American literature from Post‑Romanticism to the present as an outgrowth of Latin American history and civilization.  Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: SPN 3200 or permission of instructor.

SPN 3310.  Survey of Literature of Spain I

Masterpieces of Spanish literature from Middle Ages to Golden Age as an outgrowth of Spanish history and civilization.  Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: SPN 3200 or permission of instructor.

SPN 3320.  Survey of Literature of Spain II

Masterpieces of Spanish literature from the eighteenth, nineteenth and twentieth centuries as an outgrowth of Spanish history and civilization.  Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: SPN 3200 or permission of instructor.

SPN 3360. History of the Spanish Language

This course offers a panoramic study of the evolution of spoken Latin into modern Spanish.  Topics covered will include: the major historical events that influenced the evolution of Spanish; phonological change; morphological and syntactic change; lexical borrowings from other languages; and semantic change.  We will also study representative texts that illustrate the evolution of the Spanish language, and students will be assigned a similar text as an individual project.  Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ: SPN 3110, SPN 3120 and SPN 3150; or permission of instructor.

SPN 3510.  Study Abroad

A trip designed to acquaint students with various aspects of Latin American or Spanish life and civilization through visits to places of historical and cultural interest.  Credit, 2‑7 semester hours.  PREREQ: Permission of department chair.

SPN 3610.  Civilization and Culture of Spanish America

A course designed to give students a better understanding of the history and civilization of Spanish America and to increase their knowledge of general Hispanic cultures.  Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: SPN 2320 or SPN 2330 or permission of instructor.

SPN 3620.  Civilization and Culture of Spain

A course designed to give students a better understanding of the history and civilization of Spain and to increase their knowledge of general Hispanic culture.  Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: SPN 2320 or SPN 2330 or permission of instructor.

SPN 3700.  Advanced Grammar and Composition

Refinement of Spanish writing skills through exercises which enhance control of grammar, expand vocabulary, and promote greater awareness of rhetoric and critical reading.  Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ:  SPN 3150 or permission of instructor.

SPN 3710.  Business Spanish

Spanish as applied to business skills such as letter writing, making reservations, billing, ordering, and using the metric system.  Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ:  SPN 3150 or permission of instructor.

SPN 4130.  Topics in Colonial Spanish-American Literature

This course covers literature from the first written expressions of pre-Columbian America to the authors and works of Spanish America as a colony of Spain. Credit: 3-6 semester hours. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits with the change of topic.  PREREQ:  SPN 3700 or permission of instructor.

SPN 4140.  19th Century Spanish-American Literature

This course covers literature from the works and authors of independent Spanish America at the beginning of the 19th Century to the authors and works of Spanish American Modernism.  Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ:  SPN 3700 or permission of instructor.

SPN 4150.  Contemporary Spanish-American Literature

This course covers the main literary schools, authors, and works in Spanish America from the early 20th century to the present.  Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ:  SPN 3700 or permission of instructor.

SPN 4230.  Topics in Medieval, Renaissance, and Golden Age Literature

This course concentrates on main literary works and/or authors of Spain from the origins of Spanish Peninsular literature (XII Century) to the Golden Age (XVII Century). Credit: 3-6 semester hours. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits with the change of topic.  PREREQ:  SPN 3700 or permission of instructor.

SPN 4240.  19th Century Literature of Spain

A course that focuses on topics pertaining to the main literary schools, authors, and works in Spain from the Spanish peninsular Romanticism to Realism and Naturalism at the end of the nineteenth century.  Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ:  SPN 3700 or permission of instructor.

SPN 4250.  Contemporary Literature of Spain

The main literary schools, authors, and works in Spain from the early 20th century to the present.  Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ:  SPN 3700 or permission of instructor.

SPN 4400.  Methods of Teaching Spanish

Theory and applied methods and materials and evaluation procedures for teaching foreign languages in grades K-12.  Credit, 3 sem. hours.  PREREQ:  SPN 3700 and admission to Teacher Education Program.

SPN 4480.  Professional Seminar for Pre-Service Teachers

This seminar is specifically designed to coincide with the teacher candidate internship experience.  Through the seminar, teacher candidates are supported with the appropriate resources to complement their teaching experience in off-campus public school settings.  Emphasis is placed on increasing students’ pedagogical expertise by discussing controversial Spanish grammar topics, addressing how to integrate culture, history, and politics into lessons, developing instructional techniques that can be easily adapted to the needs of students, and addressing the needs of heritage speakers.  Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ:  Admission to professional semester.  COREQ: SPN 4490.

SPN 4490.  Internship for Spanish Education

Provides relevant intensive full-semester internship experiences in off-campus public school setting or settings.  Requires a continuous full-time teaching experience in K-12 Spanish.  Pass/Fail grading.  Credit, 9 semester hours.  PREREQ:  Admission to professional semester.

SPN 4550.  Directed Study in Spanish

Involves investigation under faculty supervision beyond what is offered in existing courses.  Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ:  Overall GPA of at least 3.00; junior or senior standing; and permission of instructor, Department Chair, and Dean.

SPN 4700.  Introduction to Spanish Linguistics

An introduction to Spanish linguistics: a diachronic study of the phonological, morphemic, syntactical, semantic aspects of Spanish; dialectical and sociolectal differences in present-day Spanish.  Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ:  SPN 3700 or permission of instructor.

SPNS 4xxx.  Special Topics in Hispanic Studies

Selected topics related to language, literature, film, or culture of Spain or Spanish America.  Title and topic may vary from year to year.  Credit, 3 semester hours.  May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits with change of topic.  PREREQ:  SPN 3700 or permission of instructor.

OTHER FOREIGN LANGUAGES (XXX) These courses offer students the opportunity to study a foreign language not otherwise offered in the regular UNCP curriculum. 

XXX 1310, 1320.  Introductory Foreign Language Study

The sequence 1310-1320 introduces the grammar and vocabulary of the language, with attendance to some aspects of the related culture.  Aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing are stressed in that order.    Credit, 3 semester hours each.

XXX 2310, 2320.  Intermediate Foreign Language Study

The sequence 2310-2320 develops increased competence in aural comprehension, grammar, translation, and composition.    Credit, 3 semester hours each.  PREREQ:  Completion of the 1310-1320 sequence or two high school units of the specified language.

XXXS 3000.  Special Topics in Foreign Language Study

In-depth study of specific topics in a foreign language, including culture, literature, linguistics, or film.  Taught exclusively in the foreign language.    Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ:  Completion of at least 4 semesters in the foreign language in which the course is taught, or permission of instructor.

GRADUATE COURSES

For information about courses leading to a Master of Arts (M.A.) or Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) in English Education, see the School of Graduate Studies section of this catalog.

 

 

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