2013-14 CATALOG

HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, AND RECREATION

Chair: Tommy Thompson

Faculty: Lars Andersson, Ashley Ausborn, Gary Aycock, Adarian K. Barr, Brittany Bennett, Michael Blackburn, Jeff Bolles2, Megan Brown, Angelik Byrd, Danny Davis1, Kapica Davis, Jamie Deese, Susan Edkins4, Joseph Hannant, John Haskins, Megan Heimerdinger, Phil Hindson, Othello Johnson, Beverly Justice, Alex Krutsch, Robin Langley, Ben Miller, Blake Newsom, Paul OíNeil, Stephen Papay, Pauline Privitera, Shane Richardson, Steve Saulnier, Denny Scruton5, Pete Shinnick, Brad Swensen, David Synan, Joey Tamburo, Ben Thompson, O.C. Williams, Marian Wooten3

1Graduate Program Director†††††††††††††††††††† 2Health Promotion Track Coordinator

3Recreation Track Coordinator†††††††††††††††††† 4Athletic Training Coordinator

5Teacher Education Coordinator

 

The purposes of the Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation are: (1) to provide a comprehensive academic program in health, physical education, and recreation for students who plan to pursue one of these fields as a profession; (2) to provide professional preparation for prospective teachers in the area of health and physical education; (3) to provide a service program which will afford all students the opportunity to learn and participate in a wide range of activities which will benefit them now and in the future; (4) to provide competition for all interested students through a comprehensive program of intramural athletics in both team and individual sports;(5) to provide recreational activities that will enable students and faculty to enjoy their leisure time in a program that will benefit them physically, mentally, and socially; and (6) to educate individuals about risk factors associated with certain lifestyle choices and provide them with the skills to make behavioral changes that will improve their health and the quality of their lives.

The Department of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation offers the Master of Arts (M.A.) and the Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) graduate programs.For complete information about programs and courses leading to the M.A. and M.A.T., see School of Graduate Studies.

 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREES OFFERED

Athletic Training (CAATE Accredited)*

Exercise and Sport Science with tracks in Health Promotion, Recreation, Exercise Physiology, and Sport Management

Health/Physical Education with Licensure by the State of North Carolina for teaching in the public schools (K‑12)

 

*Details on the Athletic Training Education Program, including admission requirements, technical standards, and program evaluation, are included at the end of this section.

 

PROFESSIONAL CONCENTRATION OFFERED

Exercise and Sport Science

 

MINORS OFFERED

††††††† Athletic Coaching

Health Promotion

Physical Education

Recreation

†††††††

†††††††

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EXERCISE AND SPORT SCIENCE

Requirements for a Bachelor of Science Degree in Exercise and Sport Science

Sem. Hrs.

Freshman Seminar

1

General Education Requirements

44

Core Courses: HLTH 1060, 3770; HPER 3270; PED 1340, 2060, 2070, 3480, 3490, 4030, 4150

20

*Track Option (see listings below)

 

*Electives

 

 

Total: 120

 

*B.S. in Exercise and Sport Science Track Option Course Requirements

Track

Sem. Hrs.

Health Promotion Track

HLTH 2000, 3060, 3070, 3080, 3300, 3650, 4100, 4700

HPER 4999

Minor or Concentration chosen from the following list:

African American Studies, American Indian Studies, Exercise and Sport Science, Gender Studies, Information Technology, International Sociology, Marketing, Medical Sociology, Psychology, Social Welfare, Sociology, Spanish, Substance Abuse

Electives

 

27

3

18-21

 

 

 

4-7

Recreation Track

PED 1380, 2040, 4750

HPER 4999

MAT 2100

REC 2300, 3000, 3320, 4000, 4160, 4250, 4400

Track Total

Electives

 

 

 

 

 

33

22

Exercise Physiology Track

ATH 1040

HLTH 3300, 4100

PED 3400, 4020, 4110, 4120, 4240, six Coaching courses

REC 4000

Track Total

Electives

 

 

 

 

 

33

22

Sport Management Track

ATH 4050

HLTH 2000, 4100, 4700

HPER 4999

PED 3120, 3400, 4750

REC 3320, 4400

Track Total

Electives

 

 

 

 

 

 

33

22

 

 

 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HEALTH/PHYSICAL EDUCATION (K-12)

Coordinator: Denny Scruton

Upon successful completion of the program of study in Health/Physical Education and related requirements, graduates are eligible for an ďAĒ license to teach in the State of North Carolina.For a more detailed description, including the program standards and goals and objectives, turn to Undergraduate Licensure Programs in the School of Education section of this catalog.

Course Requirements

Sem. Hrs.

Freshman Seminar and General Education (*should take PED 1380 in Gen. Ed.)

45(43)*

Essential Standards

PED 1010, 1380 (also meets Gen Ed. Req.)*; PED 2000, 2040, 2060, 2070, 3120, 3480, 3490, 4120, 4150, 4240; 2 1-hour coaching courses

HLTH 1060, 3300, 3650, 3770, 4100, 4700

40

Professional Studies Core

EDN 2100, 3130, 3150, SED 3310

12

Content Pedagogy

PED 3000, 3170, 3175, 3020, 4040, 4060

EDN 4490

20

General Electives

3

 

Total:120

NOTE:Students who desire teacher licensure in Health/Physical Education should declare the major as soon as possible in their college career. Consultation with the Program Coordinator or program advisor prior to registering for General Education courses is strongly recommended.

 

 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ATHLETIC TRAINING

Requirements for a Bachelor of Science Degree in Athletic Training

Sem. Hrs.

Freshman Seminar

1

General Education Requirements (see specific Gen. Ed. Requirements)

Specific General Education Requirements:

BIO 1000 or 1030; CHM 1300 and 1100 or 1400 and 1120; MAT 1070

44

Other Mandated Requirements:

MAT 2100

Department Required Courses:

ATH 1040, 1090, 2000, 2010, 2040, 2050, 3000, 3010, 3040, 3050, 3070, 3100, 4000, 4050, 4900, 4980

ATHL 2040, 2050, 3040, 3050

HLTH 1060, 2060

PED 3480, 3490, 4110, 4120

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

64

Electives

11

 

Total: 120

 

†††††††

Professional Concentration in Exercise and Sport Science

Requirements for a Professional Concentration in Exercise and Sport Science

Sem. Hrs.

Required: At least 18 hours of any combination of ATH, HLTH, PED, and/or REC prefixed courses that do not duplicate any present PE K-12 Licensure requirement.

 

 

Total:18

 

MINORS

 

Requirements for a Minor in Physical Education

Sem. Hrs.

ATH 1040,1090; HLTH 1060; PED 1340; 2070; 2300; 3120; 3190; 3320; 4150; two (2) 1‑hr. coaching courses

 

 

Total: 20

 

Requirements for a Minor in Recreation

Sem. Hrs.

REC 3000, 3320, 4000, 4160, 4250, and 4400

 

 

Total: 18

 

Requirements for a Minor in Health Promotion

Sem. Hrs.

HLTH 2000, 3300, 3650, 4100, and 4700; and either HLTH 3060, 3070, or 3770

 

 

Total: 18

 

Requirements for a Minor in Athletic Coaching

Sem. Hrs.

ATH 1040; HLTH 1060; REC 2300; PED 3260; 3400; 3480 or 3490; 4120; 4150; and four (4) 1‑hr. coaching courses

 

 

Total: 22

 

 

COURSES

ATHLETIC TRAINING (ATH, ATHL)

ATH 1040. Introduction to Athletic Training

An introductory course to the field of athletic training for potential athletic trainers and HPER students; topics include professional development, risk management, pathology of sports injuries, management of athletic injuries, etc.Credit, 3 semester hours.Required for admission to ATEP.

ATH 1090.Healthful Living

A study of major and contemporary personal and health promotion topics. Eight-week course.Credit, 1 semester hour.

ATH 2000. Clinical Education I

This course is the first in the Clinical Education sequence of courses.It is the cornerstone of the clinical skill acquisition in athletic training.Although the student may be exposed to multiple learning opportunities, the clinical focus of this course is risk management and acute care of injuries and illnesses. Credit, 2 semester hours.PREREQ: Admission to the ATEP.

ATH 2010. Clinical Education II

This course is the second in the Clinical Education sequence of courses. It continues the clinical skill acquisition in athletic training by building on the didactic courses of the previous semester. Although the student may be exposed to multiple learning opportunities, the clinical focus of this course is assessment of lower extremity injuries.Credit, 3 semester hours.PREREQ:ATH 2000.

ATH 2040. Lower Extremities Assessment

A course in athletic injury evaluation of the major joints of the lower body, the spine, and the abdomen including location of bony and soft tissues landmarks, special tests, assessment techniques, etc. Credit, 3 semester hours.

ATHL 2040. Lower Extremity Assessment Lab

This course provides the student with the formal instruction and evaluation of the psychomotor skills necessary for lower extremity assessment.†† Credit, 2 semester hours.PREREQ: Enrollment in or credit for ATH 2040.

ATH 2050. Upper Extremities Assessment

A course in athletic injury evaluation of the major joints of the upper body, head, neck and thorax including location of bony and soft tissues landmarks, special tests, assessment techniques, etc. Credit, 3 semester hours.

ATHL 2050. Upper Extremity Assessment Lab

This course provides the student with the formal instruction and evaluation of the psychomotor skills necessary for upper extremity assessment.†† Credit, 2 semester hours.PREREQ: Enrollment in or credit for ATH 2050.

ATH 3000.Clinical Education III

This course is the third in the Clinical Education sequence of courses. It continues the clinical skill acquisition in athletic training by building on the didactic courses of the previous semester. Although the student may be exposed to multiple learning opportunities, the clinical focus of this course is assessment of upper extremity injuries and therapeutic modalities.Credit, 3 semester hours.PREREQ:ATH 2010.

ATH 3010. Clinical Education IV

This course is the fourth in the Clinical Education sequence of courses. It continues the clinical skill acquisition in athletic training by building on the didactic courses of the previous semester. Although the student may be exposed to multiple learning opportunities, the clinical focus of this course is therapeutic exercise.Credit, 3 semester hours.PREREQ:ATH 3000.

ATH 3040. Therapeutic Modalities

An advanced course designed to cover the physical basis and physiological effects of agents and modalities commonly used in the treatment of athletic injuries; emphasis will be placed on establishing a foundation for selecting a treatment protocol for an injury.Credit, 3 semester hours.PREREQ: Enrollment in or credit for ATHL 3040 and admission to the ATEP.

ATHL 3040. Therapeutic Modalities Lab

This course provides the student with the formal instruction and evaluation of the psychomotor skills in therapeutic modalities.†† Credit, 1 semester hour.PREREQ: Enrollment in or credit for ATH 3040.

ATH 3050. Therapeutic Exercise

An advanced course covering the principles of the rehabilitation of athletic injuries from the time of injury until the athlete returns to competition.†† Credit, 3 semester hours.PREREQ: Enrollment in or credit for ATHL 3050 and admission to the ATEP.

ATHL 3050. Therapeutic Exercise Lab

This course provides the student with the formal instruction and evaluation of the psychomotor skills in therapeutic exercise.†† Credit, 1 semester hour.PREREQ: Enrollment in or credit for ATH 3050.

ATH 3070. Pharmacology

This course is designed to give the upper-level student a background in pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics and present the student with information necessary to make sound clinical decisions concerning drugs and pharmacology reactions that may arise.Emphasis will be placed on the prescription and over-the-counter drugs commonly used in athletic training.Commonly abused drugs in sport will be discussed as well.Credit, 3 semester hours.PREREQ:PED 3490 or CHM 1400 or CHM 1300 or permission of instructor.

ATH 3100. General Medical Conditions

This course will introduce the student to a system-oriented approach to medical concerns. It will provide the student with the basic information needed to evaluate and respond to medical conditions encountered in the athletic training environment.†† Credit, 3 semester hours.

ATH 4000.Clinical Education V

This course is the culmination of the clinical education series of courses. It requires the student to use critical thinking and problem solving skills to demonstrate clinical proficiency in the twelve domains of athletic training. Although the student may be exposed to multiple learning opportunities, the clinical focus of this course is general medical conditions, psychosocial intervention, health care administration, and learning over time. Credit, 4 semester hours.PREREQ: ATH 3010.

ATH 4050. Organization & Administration of Athletic Training

Designed to provide the advanced athletic training student with organizational skills and an understanding of the management and administrative responsibilities of the certified athletic trainer; also to include resource management, facility design and legal considerations.Credit, 3 semester hours.

ATH 4900. Research Techniques

An analysis of research issues specifically related to the profession of athletic training.Course will address the need for a unique research base, and research will be developed from within the profession to link athletic training skills to underlying theory.Credit, 2 semester hours.

ATH 4980.BOC Preparation

Seminar designed to prepare the senior athletic training student for the entry-level athletic training national certification examination.Credit, 1 semester hour.

 

HEALTH PROMOTION (HLTH)

HLTH 1060.Safety and First Aid

A certified-based American Red Cross study of safety, first aid, CPR, and emergency procedures.Eight-week course.Credit, 1 semester hour.

HLTH 2000.Principles of Health and Fitness Promotion

A generic introduction for students pursuing professional preparation in health promotion. It will discuss the historical and philosophical perspectives of the development of health promotion and examine the delivery of health promotion in a variety of settings. ††Credit, 3 semester hours.

HLTH 2060.Nutrition (PED 2060)

Designed to investigate topics in nutrition which are most relevant to physical activity, fitness, health, and sports participation. Along with general nutrition information, topics will include the effects foods have on physical performance, eating disorders, and proper body fat control. Half-semester course.†† Credit, 1 semester hour.

HLTH 3060. Human Sexuality

This course will provide the student with an examination of the physiological, psychological and sociological factors of human sexuality.Topics include social and biological foundations of human sexuality, human reproduction and contraception, cross-cultural perspectives on sexual behavior and society, gender roles, sexual stereotyping, issues in sex education, and the effects of various climates (economics, policy, politics, etc) on the expression of human sexuality. Credit, 3 semester hours.

HLTH 3070. Women's Health Issues

Course will provide the student with an examination of the various health issues that are specific to women.Topics will include, but are not limited to, the menstrual cycle, reproductive health and menopause, osteopenia and osteoporosis, the female athlete triad, female-specific illnesses including cancers, etc. Credit, 3 semester hours.

HLTH 3080.Ethnic and Cultural Implications in Health Promotion

This course will provide in-depth study of the importance of cultural competence and cultural sensitivity in the practice of health promotion and education.Students in this course will develop a better understanding of those cultural behaviors, often considered by Westerners as exotic, that will need to be embraced when employing health promotion programming. Credit, 3 semester hours.

HLTH 3300.Health Promotion and Fitness Skills

This course will acquaint students with various learning theories and teaching methods. The focus will be upon selecting methods, media and techniques best suited for teaching health promotion and fitness content to specific learners.†† Credit, 3 semester hours.

HLTH 3650. Epidemiology of Human Diseases

Study of the disease process including causes, effects, and control of selected diseases with emphasis on disease prevention and health promotion.†† Credit, 3 semester hours.

HLTH 3770.Drugs, Society, and Behavior

A study of the types and functions of pharmaceutical treatments. Drug addiction is analyzed as a social, psychological, and biological process.†† Credit, 3 semester hours. PREREQ: SOC 2800 or permission of instructor.

HLTH 4100. Health and Fitness Behavior Changes

This course provides students with the foundations necessary to develop a theoretical basis for the analysis and interpretation of specific health and fitness behaviors. This foundation will assist them in planning, implementing and evaluating behavioral change program for individuals or groups.†† Credit, 3 semester hours.

HLTH 4250.Leisure and Wellness for Older Adults (REC 4250)

The study of the physical, social, and emotional characteristics, needs, and interests of middle and older adults related to fitness and leisure activities utilizing a theoretical and practical approach.†† Credit, 3 semester hours.

HLTH 4700.Planning, Administration, and Evaluation of Programs

This course will provide an in‑depth examination of program‑planning and evaluation in areas of health, fitness, leisure activity, etc. Emphasis will be placed on the overall planning processes for developing a variety of wellness settings.†† Credit, 3 semester hours.

HLTH 4910, 4920.Three-Credit Internship

A practical work experience in a health promotion setting, e.g., hospital, public health agency or industry supervised by an on‑site supervisor and a UNCP faculty member.†† Majors must have at least a 2.0 QPA within the major to be eligible for the internship.Credit, 3 semester hours.

 

HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, AND RECREATION (HPER)

HPER 3270. Funding and Grant Writing

Practical experience in researching and writing grant proposals, fund-raising, etc., as it applies to possible avenues for funding from a variety of potential sources to support a variety of exercise, fitness, recreational, sport, and other human movement activities.Credit, 1 semester hour.

HPER 4999.Internship

Intern will be assigned practical, related field/work experience and be supervised by an on-site supervisor.  The intern must get all arrangements satisfied with the program coordinator early in the semester before the internship begins. Credit, 6 semester hours.PREREQ: Approval of program director.

 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION (PED)

PED 1010.Wellness and Fitness

Basic, practical concepts concerning health, disease, fitness, exercise, obesity, etc., will be covered as related to personal wellness and fitness. Credit, 1 semester hour.

PED 1300.Fitness Walking

Credit, 1 semester hour.

PED 1310.Archery

Credit, 1 semester hour.

PED 1320.Badminton

Credit, 1 semester hour.

PED 1330.Golf

Credit, 1 semester hour.

PED 1340.Swimming

Credit, 1 semester hour.

PED 1350.Tennis

Credit, 1 semester hour.

PED 1360.Soccer

Credit, 1 semester hour.

PED 1370.Bowling

$20 fee.†† Credit, 1 semester hour.

PED 1380.Rhythms and Dance

Aimed at teachers.Credit, 1 semester hour.

PED 1390. Racquetball

Credit, 1 semester hour.

PED 1410.Physical Conditioning

Credit, 1 semester hour.

PED 1450.Volleyball

Credit, 1 semester hour.

PED 1460.Weight Training

Credit, 1 semester hour.

PED 1640.Fall Sport Varsity Athlete

Course open only to varsity athletes; grading is P/F. Can take only one time. Credit, 1 semester hour.

PED 1650.Spring Sport Varsity Athlete

Course open only to varsity athletes; grading is P/F. Can take only one time. Credit, 1 semester hour.

PED 1770.Advanced Physical Conditioning

Aimed at varsity athletes and/or extremely well-conditioned students; very intense training/conditioning; must have special permission to take. Credit, 1 semester hour.

PED 1790.Aerobic Dance

Credit, 1 semester hour.

PED 1800.Military Physical Training (MSC 1800)

Must be approved to register for this course.Credit, 1 sem. hr.

PED 1810.Stage Dance I (THE 1810)

Basic dance technique for the stage.Credit, 1 semester hour. PREREQ:Permission of instructor.

PED 1820.Stage Dance II (THE 1820)

Basic dance technique for the stage.Credit, 1 semester hour. PREREQ: Permission of instructor.

PED 1900.Outdoor Fitness

A course designed to initiate students to outdoor fitness elements such as hiking, orienteering, climbing, etc.An outside nominal fee may be necessary.Credit, 1 semester hour.

PED 1910.Indoor Cycling

Credit, 1 semester hour.

PED 1950.Water Aerobics

Credit, 1 semester hour.

PED 2000.Motor Learning and Development

Designed to evaluate the execution and competency of a variety of fundamental movements, skills, etc. related to the teaching of physical education, sports, etc.†† Credit, 1 semester hour.

PED 2040.Adaptive Physical Education

Designed especially for teachers of exceptional children as well as for those who work with the handicapped; practical application of physical education activities, equipment, and modification of facilities for adaptive children and adults with adaptive needs; age, grade, and handicap levels will be considered. Credit, 1 semester hour.

PED 2060.Nutrition(HLTH 2060)

Designed to investigate topics in nutrition which are most relevant to physical activity, fitness, health, and sports participation. Along with general nutrition information, topics will include the effects foods have on physical performance, eating disorders, and proper body fat control. Credit, 1 semester hour.

PED 2070.Technology Applications in HPER

Basic and thorough on‑task development of computer hardware, terminals, operations, software, peripheral systems, recorders, printers, etc. Instruction methods as well as computer‑assisted instruction will be discussed and developed in a variety of disciplines.†† Credit, 1 semester hour.

PED 2300.Officiating Sports (REC 2300)

An overview of the rules and mechanics of officiating sports; practical experience via intramural officiating.Credit, 1 semester hour.

PED 3000. Health/PE Activities for Grades K‑3

A study of the appropriate teaching methodologies of health and movement materials/activities in grades K-3 as it relates to health, wellness, and fitness that's appropriate for this age level.†† Credit, 2 semester hours.

PED 3020.Health/PE Activities in Grades 10‑12

A study of the appropriate teaching methodologies of health and movement materials/activities in grades 10-12 as it relates to health, wellness, and fitness that's appropriate for this age level.†† Credit, 2 semester hours. PREREQ: Must be admitted into Teacher Education in order to take this course.

PED 3120.PE and Sport in Contemporary Society(SOC 3120)

A study of the historical and philosophical aspects of PE and sport from sociocultural, psychological, and politicalperspectives, including the relationship of sport and PEto other social institutions and schools as well as the changing concepts and evolution of leisure, PE and sports.†† Literature on past events, current issues, and the sociological foundation of modern PE will be examined. Credit, 3 semester hours.

PED 3170. Health/PE Activities for Grades 4-6

A study of the appropriate teaching methodologies of health and movement materials/activities in grades 4-6 as it relates to health, wellness, and fitness that's appropriate for this age level.†† Credit, 2 semester hours.

PED 3175.Health/PE Activities in Grades 7-9

A study of the appropriate teaching methodologies of health and movement materials/activities in grades 7-9 as it relates to health, wellness, and fitness that's appropriate for this age level.†† Credit, 2 semester hours.

PED 3260.Practicum in Athletic Coaching

Practical field experience in coaching athletic teams. Student can be assigned to either a member of the University coaching staff, a junior or senior high school coaching staff as an assistant, a recreation team, etc.†† Credit, 1 semester hour.

PED 3320.Teaching Swimming

Methods, materials, techniques, and skills of teaching swimming. Credit, 1 semester hour.

PED 3330.Lifeguard Training

Will include first aid, CPR for professional rescuer, AED, and disease-transmission certification.Credit, 2 semester hours.

PED 3340.Lifeguard Instructor

Instructorís course leading to Red Cross certification.Credit, 1 semester hour. Prerequisite: Must be Red Cross certified lifeguard training course (PED 3330).

PED 3350.Water Safety Instructor (WSI)

Instructorís course in teaching swimming and lifesaving techniques leading to Red Cross certification.†† Credit, 1 semester hour. Prerequisites: PED 3330 Lifeguard Training and current First Aid/CPR certification card(s).

PED 3400. Sport and Exercise Psychology (REC 3400)

A study of the psychological theories and techniques that can affect motivation, performance and personal growth as associated with exercise and sport.†† Credit, 3 semester hour.

PED 3480.Kinesiology

A structural study of the muscular system of the human body with emphasis on, and biomechanical analysis of, kinetic applications/movements relative to physical education, sport, and human movement.†† Credit, 3 semester hours.

PED 3490.Anatomy and Physiology

A study of the anatomical and physiological functions, parts, and processes of the various systems of the human body to include cell, tissue, and organ, and structural study.†† Credit, 3 semester hours.

PED 3500.Coaching Football

A study of offensive and defensive play, strategies, fundamentals, and conditioning. Credit, 1 semester hour.

PED 3510.Coaching Basketball (Men or Women)

A study of offensive and defensive play, strategies, fundamentals, and conditioning. Credit, 1 semester hour.

PED 3520.Coaching Track and Field

A study of fundamentals, individual techniques, conditioning, maintaining facilities, and staging events. Credit, 1 semester hour.

PED 3530.Coaching Baseball

A study of offensive and defensive play, strategies, fundamentals, and conditioning. Credit, 1 semester hour.

PED 3540.Coaching Wrestling

A study of fundamentals, moves, strategies, and conditioning. Credit, 1 semester hour.

PED 3550.Coaching Soccer

A study of offensive and defensive play, strategies, fundamentals, and conditioning. Credit, 1 semester hour.

PED 3560.Coaching Softball

A study of offensive and defensive play, strategies, fundamentals, and conditioning. Credit, 1 semester hour.

PED 3640.Coaching Volleyball

A study of offensive and defensive play, strategies, fundamentals, and conditioning. Credit, 1 semester hour.

PED 3660.Coaching Tennis

A study of fundamentals, individual techniques, conditioning, drills, and conducting matches. Credit, 1 semester hour.

PED 4020.Applied Exercise and Sport Science

Provides students with a comprehensive knowledge of exercise and sport science laboratory techniques, safety concerns, treatment of subjects, modalities, and use and maintenance of lab equipment.The class focuses on research techniques, applied statistical methodology, and the development, practice, and evaluation of laboratory testing of exercise/athletic populations. Credit, 3 semester hours.

PED 4030. Facilities Design in HPER

Course will provide an introduction to planning, designing, architecture, budgeting, and construction of both indoor and outdoor facilities for PE, recreation, health, athletic training, gymnasiums, playing fields, etc.Design and construction areas such as aquatics, dance, ball fields, playgrounds, handicap accessibility, etc., will be addressed.Credit, 3 semester hours.

PED 4040.Classroom Discipline

This course will explore and examine various methods of school classroom control, management, discipline, and punitive actions if needed based on appropriate grade level(s).Liability issues will the examined as it relates to school discipline policy(ies). Credit, 1 semester hour. PREREQ: May only be taken by physical education majors during the student teaching semester.

PED 4060.Health/PE Teaching Seminar

A seminar that will explore and examine health/PE teaching methods, materials, techniques, and evaluation procedures as it relates to the teaching of both health and physical education.Credit, 2 semester hours. PREREQ: May only be taken by physical education majors during the student teaching semester.

PED 4110.Biomechanics

A qualitative and quantitative study of the mechanical factors related to human movement.The study of biomechanical principles that govern effectiveness of human kinetic movement and skills.Human movement as related to the laws of physics and biomechanics.Human biomechanical movement analysis will be explored as well as kinematic concepts.†† Credit, 3 semester hours.

PED 4120.Exercise Physiology

An analytical, practical study of how exercise affects the various physiological systems of the human body both positively and negatively.†† Sport and athletic physiology will be addressed as well.Credit, 3 semester hours.

PED4150.Organization and Administration of Physical Education and Athletics

A study of the organization and administration of physical education and athletics with particular reference to management, logistics, legal issues, budgeting, facilities, etc. Credit, 3 semester hours.

PED 4240.Tests and Measurement in Physical Education

An analysis of the methods of testing and evaluating in physical education; also an overview of statistics and data interpretation.††† Credit, 3 semester hours.

PED 4750.Sport Business and Management

Course covers the sports administration and management industry to include economics, finance, budgeting, marketing, promotion, public relations, business administration, athletic enterprise, business ethics, situational analysis, decision-making, sponsorship, licensing, etc. Credit, 3 semester hours.

PEDS 4xxx. Special Topics in HPER (RECS 4xxx)

Investigations into special topics in health, physical education, or recreation.††† Credit, 1-3 semester hours.

 

RECREATION (REC)

REC 2300.Officiating Sports (PED 2300)

An overview of the rules and mechanics of officiating various sports; practical experience via intramural officiating. Credit, 1 semester hour.

REC 3000.Introduction to Community Recreation

An introduction to the basic concepts of organized recreation including its philosophy, history, organizational patterns, programs, facilities, and leadership.†† Credit, 3 semester hours.

REC 3320.Recreation Programming

Explores the purpose and functions of programs, planning principles, objectives, organizational behavior, and evaluation.Translates program plans into practical situations.†† Credit, 3 semester hours.

REC 3400.Exercise and Sport Psychology (PED 3400)

A study of the psychological theories and techniques that can affect motivation, performance and personal growth as associated with exercise and sport.†† Credit, 3 semester hour.

REC 4000.Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation

Course is a survey of the history, philosophy, concepts and trends in therapeutic recreation services; types of individuals served, settings and services provided, and the roll of the therapeutic recreation specialist.The course is designed to provide an overview of therapeutic recreation services as a leisure service delivery system and the impact of a disability on the individual as well as personal and societal responses to people with disabilities.†† Credit, 3 semester hours.

REC 4160.Outdoor Recreation Service

Provides basis for understanding the administrative process related to the delivery of leisure services.Explores legal foundations, management systems and principles, organizational behavior, political systems, and evaluation.Credit, 3 semester hours.

REC 4250.Leisure and Wellness for Older Adults (HLTH 4250)

The study of the physical, social, and emotional characteristics, needs, and interests of middle and older adulthood related to fitness and leisure activities utilizing a theoretical and practical approach.†† Credit, 3 semester hours.

REC 4400.Tourism and Commercial Recreation

Examines the principles, practices, and philosophy of the travel industry.Explores the diversity of commercial recreation enterprises, general trends, and personal attributes associated with a career in these fields.Credit, 3 semester hours.

RECS 4xxx.Special Topics in Recreation (PEDS 4xxx)

Investigations into special topics in health, physical education, or recreation.††† Credit, 1-3 semester hours.

 

ATHLETIC TRAINING EDUCATION PROGRAM DETAILS

Program Overview

The Athletic Training Education Program (ATEP) is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE).In order to sit for the Board of Certification (BOC) exam, students must graduate from a CAATE-accredited Athletic Training Education Program.Once a student passes the BOC exam and graduates from the CAATE-accredited ATEP, he/she will hold the credential of certified athletic trainer (AT).The ATEP provides the educational and clinical foundation to prepare students to successfully challenge the BOC exam; however, successful completion of the program does not guarantee that a student will pass the BOC exam. The program provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to work with all aspects of injury, illness, and performance associated with physically active populations.

Students apply for acceptance into the ATEP during the fall of their sophomore year.Once accepted into the program, students begin the professional phase of the program.Students are required to be in the professional phase of the program for a minimum of five semesters.†††† Because the program is structured with required courses only offered in certain semesters and each semesterís content builds on the previous semester(s), students must progress through the program following the designated sequence.

Each semester students take a clinical education course which includes clinical rotations either on- or off-campus.During the first semester in the program students will complete three five-week rotations. In the remaining four semesters, students are assigned to rotations for a sport season in addition to completing rotations in a physical therapy clinic and physician office.Rotations are assigned to ensure that each student is exposed to a variety of pathologies and populations (i.e.. upper extremity injuries, lower extremity injuries, equipment intensive sports, contact, non-contact sports, adolescents, general population, etc.).

Many students elect to pursue graduate studies after graduation from the program.It is recommended that students wishing to pursue graduate studies maintain a 3.5 QPA or higher.Students are responsible for determining what pre-requisites are needed for a given graduate program and should understand that those courses would be considered university-wide electives.Furthermore, elective courses/labs cannot conflict with required clinical rotations or courses.As a result, an additional semester(s) and/or summer school may be needed to complete electives after completion of the ATEP.

ATEP Mission Statement

It is the mission of the Athletic Training Education Program (ATEP) at The University of North Carolina at Pembroke to develop competent entry-level athletic trainers capable of addressing the health-care needs of the physically active in a global society. Our distinctly diverse student body and multi-ethnic region prepare our graduates to provide quality healthcare to diverse populations in many different healthcare settings.

The UNCP ATEP faculty strives to integrate technology in the classroom to encourage active student learning, critical and creative thinking, and public service.†† The faculty is committed to personalized teaching in order to promote the intellectual and personal growth of each student.Our small class size allows for individualized learning where the incorporation of evidence-based medicine creates a foundation for clinical practice.Spacious modern facilities, unlike any other in the region, provide the clinical setting for student skill development and patient interaction.

This exposure to evidence-based medicine concepts will provide students with the tools needed to become evidence-based practitioners who value research and possess the ability to think critically.The foundational behaviors of the athletic trainer create a framework for the comprehensive competency-based didactic and clinical education components of the program. The mission of the ATEP is aligned with the overall mission of The University of North Carolina at Pembroke.

 

ATEP Goals

1.       The student will develop individual responsibility with respect to their education, personal integrity and ethics, and respect for diverse people and cultures.

2.       The student will demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively by both oral and written means with patients, peers, athletic staff, and other allied health professionals.

3.       The student will demonstrate active professional development and involvement through membership in professional organizations and foster an appreciation for life-long learning.

4.       The student will demonstrate the ability to perform the psychomotor skills of the competency areas (risk management and injury prevention; pathology of injuries and illnesses; orthopedic clinical examination and diagnosis; medical conditions and disabilities; acute care of injuries and illnesses; therapeutic modalities; conditioning and rehabilitative exercise; pharmacology; psychosocial intervention, and referral; nutritional aspects of injuries and illnesses; health care administration; professional development and responsibility).

5.       The student will demonstrate learning over time by analyzing and synthesizing the didactic and psychomotor knowledge of the content areas to effectively problem-solve and make clinical decisions.

 

Admission Requirements

Admission to the ATEP is competitive and the number of applicants accepted and enrolled into the Athletic Training Education Program is limited and is based on the applicants predicted ability to succeed in the strenuous professional program.The admission process is non-discriminatory with respect to race, color, creed, gender, sexual orientation, age, disabling conditions (handicaps), and national origin.Depending on the number of applicants, it is possible that not all applicants who meet the minimum requirements will be admitted.Consistent with university policy, the ATEP offers admission to applicants whose credentials present the best qualifications among those who meet the minimum requirements.

Students who meet the minimum requirements may apply for acceptance to the ATEP in the fall of their sophomore year.Transfer students should contact the Program Director as soon as possible prior to transferring for information on the application process. Applicants must meet the following minimum academic requirements as well as submit a completed Athletic Training Education Program application packet:

 

1.       Cumulative QPA of 2.3 or higher in all college course work;

2.       Successful completion (C or better) of the following pre-requisite courses:

         Biology 1000 OR 1030

         PED 3490 Anatomy and Physiology

         MAT 1070 College Algebra

         ATH 1040 Introduction to Athletic Training

         HLTH 1060 Safety and First Aid

         PED 3480 Kinesiology

         CHM 1300 and 1100 (lab) OR CHM 1400 and 1120 (lab);

3.       Completion of a formal letter of application addressed to Mrs. Susan Edkins, Program Director. Applicants should indicate their reasons for applying to the ATEP and include a statement of their career goals upon completion of the B.S. in Athletic Training degree;

4.       Completion of the ATEP Application available from the Program Director;

5.       Signed copy of the Technical Standards (available on the website at www.uncp.edu/hper/training);

6.       Physical examination to be completed at Student Health Services (form available from the Program Director);

7.       Verification of Immunizations to be completed by Student Health Services;

8.       Completed professional recommendation forms from two UNCP faculty members, ATCís, other allied health care professionals, or other appropriate individuals;

9.       A formal interview with the Athletic Training Admissions Committee;

10.   Completion of a minimum of 50 hours of clinical observation and the Pre-Professional Observation Packet with a certified athletic trainer (documentation form available from the Program Director).

 

Satisfactory Progression Policy

In order to remain in the professional phase of the ATEP, students are required to earn a C or better in all ATH, ATHL, and PED courses.Failure to earn a C or higher in a course will result in the student having to repeat the course at the next available offering.

Based on the sequential course of study, students will be suspended from the ATEP until the deficient course is successfully completed in the following circumstances:

         Failure to earn a C or higher in an ATHL course (2040, 2050, 3040, 3050)

         Failure to earn a C or higher in a Clinical Education course (ATH 2000, 2010, 3000, 3010, or 4000)

         Failure to earn a C or higher in ATH 4900

Students will be dismissed from the ATEP (and not permitted to major in Athletic Training) in the following circumstances:

         Failure to earn a C or higher in more than one ATH course in one semester

         Failure to earn a C or higher when repeating an ATH, ATHL, or PED course

         Being placed on probation from the ATEP in two consecutive semesters

In addition to the coursework, students are required to maintain the following items each year in order to remain in the professional phase of the ATEP:

         Current certification in CPR for the Professional Rescuer

         NATA Membership

         Professional Liability Insurance

 

Transfer Students

Transfer students will be allowed to formally apply to the program the semester before entering the University. It is the studentís responsibility to contact the ATEP Program Director and obtain the necessary forms/documents to complete the application process. Each student will be expected to complete the same requirements as the prospective UNC Pembroke ATEP students. After formal acceptance into the program, the transfer student will be allowed to enroll immediately in clinical and professional courses and to begin supervised clinical assignments. Any clinical work completed by the transfer student before acceptance into UNCPís ATEP will not be accepted towards course substitution in regards to clinical rotations. Students are not permitted to receive transfer credit for ATH courses other than ATH 1040 and 1090.

 

Associated Program Fees

The student is responsible for the following additional costs associated with the Athletic Training Education Program:professional liability insurance; transportation to off-campus rotation sites; uniform items; NATA Membership; UNC Pembroke Athletic Training Student Association dues.The ATEP provides students with the other necessary supplies.

 

Technical Standards for the Athletic Training Education Program

The Athletic Training Education Program at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke is a rigorous and intense program that places specific requirements and demands on the students enrolled in the program.An objective of this program is to prepare graduates to enter a variety of employment settings and to render care to a wide spectrum of individuals engaged in physical activity. The technical standards set by the Athletic Training Education Program establish the essential qualities considered necessary for students admitted to this program to achieve the knowledge, skills, and competencies of an entry-level athletic trainer as well as CAATE standards. All students admitted to the ATEP must meet the abilities and expectations outlined below. In the event a student is unable to fulfill these technical standards, with or without reasonable accommodation, the student will not be admitted into the program. Compliance with the programís technical standards does not guarantee a studentís eligibility for the BOC certification exam.

Candidates for selection must demonstrate:

1. †† The ability to assimilate, analyze, synthesize, integrate concepts and problem-solve to formulate assessment and therapeutic judgments and to be able to distinguish deviations from the norm;

2. †† Sufficient postural and neuromuscular control, sensory function, and coordination to perform appropriate physical exams using accepted techniques, and accurately, safely, and efficiently use equipment and materials during the assessment and treatment of patients;

3. †† The ability to communicate effectively and sensitively with patients and colleagues, including individuals from different cultural and social backgrounds; this includes, but is not limited to, the ability to establish rapport with patients and communicate judgments and treatment information effectively. Students must be able to understand and speak the English language at a level consistent with competent professional practice;

4. †† The ability to record physical exam results and a treatment plan clearly and accurately;

5.       The capacity to maintain composure and continue to function well, during periods of high stress;

6.       The perseverance, diligence, and commitment to complete the athletic training education program as outlined and sequenced;

7. †† Flexibility and the ability to adjust to changing situations and uncertainty in clinical situations;

8. †† Affective skills and appropriate demeanor and rapport that relate to professional education and quality patient care.

 

Candidates for selection into the program will be required to verify they understand and meet these technical standards or that they believe that, with certain accommodations, they can meet the standards.The University of North Carolina at Pembroke is committed to providing an accessible and supportive environment for students with disabilities.Disability Support Services will evaluate a student who states he/she could meet the programís technical standards with accommodations and confirm that the stated condition qualifies as a disability under applicable laws.If a student states he/she can meet the technical standards with accommodation, then the University will determine whether it agrees.This includes a review of whether the accommodations requested are reasonable, taking into account whether the accommodation would jeopardize clinician/patient safety or the educational process of the student or the institution, including all coursework, clinical education, and clinical experiences deemed essential to graduation.

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