2013-14 CATALOG

THE MASTER OF ARTS IN ENGLISH EDUCATION (M.A.)

Director: Roger A. Ladd

 

   The curriculum in the Master of Arts in English Education affirms the richness of language and literature produced by diverse groups.  Thus, the program offers courses in language, literacy, literature, and pedagogy.  Core courses and electives within a chosen emphasis expand students’ personal, intellectual, and professional horizons through classroom experiences and opportunities for travel. 

    In-service teachers who are admitted with initial licensure will be recommended for the North Carolina M license in English upon successful completion of the Licensure Concentration of the program. The UNCP Graduate Program in English Education is approved by the Department of Public Instruction for Advanced Licensure in English and is one of the few programs in the state offering courses leading to add-on ESL licensure.   Furthermore, program goals and objectives are aligned with National Board Certification standards.

   College graduates with backgrounds in English or related fields who are admitted to the program seek advanced knowledge and skills in language, literacy, and literature for various personal and professional proposes, including preparation to teach in community colleges. Through graduate course work, candidates for the Master of Arts in English Education acquire, extend, synthesize, apply, and reflect upon their knowledge, expertise, and experience in language, literacy, literature, and pedagogy. 

The Master of Arts in English Education offers two Concentrations: the Licensure Concentration and the Thesis Concentration. The Licensure Concentration focuses on the needs of candidates who already hold initial teacher licensure and prepares those students for advanced licensure. The Thesis Concentration focuses on the needs of candidates who want to develop their teaching and research in a postsecondary context, with a balance of pedagogical and research interests.

The culminating product of the graduate experience in the Licensure Concentration is a Capstone Portfolio and Presentation, in which the candidate demonstrates a clearly articulated, coherent philosophy of teaching literacy and literature.  This philosophy demonstrates the candidate’s proficiency in those areas that constitute program goals:

1. Teacher Leadership

2. Respectful Educational Environments

3. Content and Curriculum Expertise

4. Student Learning

5. Reflection

The culminating product of the graduate experience in the Thesis Concentration is the Six-Credit Thesis (ENG 6020 and ENG 6030), in which the candidate demonstrates sustained development of a major research project. This Thesis must then be successfully defended before a panel of graduate faculty.

   

Requirements for a Master of Arts in English Education:

Licensure Concentration

Sem. Hrs.

A. Core Courses (15 hours required)

ENG 5000—Literacy in Context: Issues and Reform

ENG 5300— Theories and Methods of Literary Research

EED 5510—The Teaching of Writing: Theory and Practice

EED 5520—The Teaching of Literature: Theories, Issues, and Practices

EDN 5490—Effective Educational Leadership

15

B. Content Courses (Choose 21 credit hours from the following courses)

ENG 5030—North Carolina Literature

ENG 5050/AIS 5500—Native American Literature

ENG 5100—Rhetorical Grammar

ENG 5110—Principles of English Linguistics

ENG 5200—Issues in Contemporary American English

ENG 5210—Advanced Creative Writing

SPE  5230—Spoken Communication

ENG 5440—Process Writing: Theory and ENG 5450—Process Writing: Practice

ENG 5500—Advanced Nonfiction Writing

ENG 5600—Americans in Paris

ENG 5610—Shakespeare Studies

ENG 5750—Film Studies

ENG 5810—Phonetics and Phonology

ENG 5830—Second Language Acquisition

ENG 5850—Cultural Issues of English as a Second Language

TESL 5890—Applied Pedagogy of Teaching English as a Second Language

ENGS 5000-5099 — Literary Topic Seminar

ENGS 5100-5199—Special Topics in Literacy

ENGS 5200-5299 — Literary Genre Seminar

ENGS 5300-5399 — Author Seminar

ENGS 5400-5499 — Literary Period Seminar

ENG 6010—Three-Credit Thesis or ENG 6020—Six-Credit Thesis I and ENG 6030— Six-Credit Thesis II

Guided Elective course: With approval of the Program Director, candidates may enroll in one graduate course in another program at UNCP (assuming that they meet its prerequisites); the candidate must complete an Elective Transfer Form laying out the rationale for the elective course furthering the candidate’s professional and educational goals. Candidates are particularly encouraged to use EDN 5660, EDN 5470, and EDN 5480 as elective courses.

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C.  Capstone Portfolio and Presentation is the culminating experience of the graduate program and takes place during the last semester (fall or spring) of the candidate’s course work.

 

 

Program Total: 36

 

Requirements for a Master of Arts in English Education:

Thesis Concentration

Sem. Hrs.

A. Core Courses (12 hours required)

EED 5510—The Teaching of Writing: Theory and Practice

EED 5520—The Teaching of Literature: Theories, Issues, and Practices

ENG 5300—Theories and Methods of Literary Research

ENGS 5700-5799—Expanding Canon Seminar

12

B.  Electives (18 hours required)

ENG 5000— Literacy in Context: Issues and Reform

ENG 5030—North Carolina Literature

ENG 5050/AIS 5500—Native American Literature

ENG 5100—Rhetorical Grammar

ENG 5110—Principles of English Linguistics

ENG 5200—Issues in Contemporary American English

ENG 5210—Advanced Creative Writing

SPE  5230—Spoken Communication

ENG 5440—Process Writing: Theory and ENG 5450—Process Writing: Practice

ENG 5500— Advanced Nonfiction Writing

ENG 5600—Americans in Paris

ENG 5610—Shakespeare Studies

ENG 5750—Film Studies

ENG 5810—Phonetics and Phonology

ENG 5830—Second Language Acquisition)

ENG 5850—Cultural Issues of English as a Second Language

TESL 5890—Applied Pedagogy of Teaching English as a Second Language

ENGS 5000-5099 — Literary Topic Seminar

ENGS 5100-5199—Special Topics in Literacy

ENGS 5200-5299 — Literary Genre Seminar

ENGS 5300-5399 — Author Seminar

ENGS 5400-5499 — Literary Period Seminar

18

C. Thesis  (6 hours required)

ENG 6020— Six-Credit Thesis I

ENG 6030— Six-Credit Thesis II

6

 

Program Total: 36

 

Requirements for Graduate Add-On Licensure in English as a Second Language (ESL)

Sem. Hrs.

ENG 5810—Phonetics and Phonology (fall odd years)

ENG 5830—Second Language Acquisition (spring even years)

ENG 5850—Cultural Issues of English as a Second Language (fall even years)

TESL 5890—Applied Pedagogy of Teaching English as a Second Language (spring odd years)

NOTE: Candidates for this licensure must have taken ENG 3460—Aspects of the English Language and ENG 3710—English Grammar or their equivalents.

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The degree must be completed within five years of admission to the program.  Students should consult with the Program Director about rotation of core courses and schedule their capstone experience to assure completion of all requirements in a timely manner.

 

COURSES

Some courses fulfill requirements for students in other graduate programs.  

A. ENGLISH EDUCATION COURSES (EED)

(also in the Licensure Concentration core is EDN 5490, Effective Educational Leadership—see listing in M.A.Ed. program)

EED 5510. The Teaching of Writing: Theory and Practice 

Study and classroom application of composition theories (current-traditional, expressive, cognitive, social epistemic) and scholarship on writing.  Study and application of types of writing, writing assignments, writing curricula and units, and strategies for teaching and assessing writing in English and Language Arts classes (6-12) and college composition courses. Specific topics may include process writing, writing across the curriculum, integrated language arts, adapting to diverse learners, technology applications, and alignment with the N.C. Standard Course of Study. Credit, 3 semester hours.

EED 5520.  The Teaching of Literature: Theories, Issues, and Practices

Theories of literary interpretation and their application to curricula and pedagogy for students with diverse learning styles, cultural backgrounds, and developmental needs; assessment of reading and literature; applications of  technology, multidisciplinary approaches, and scholarly research through clinical experiences in literature classes; understanding purposes, genres, and conventions of written, spoken, media texts. Credit, 3 semester hours.

B. ENGLISH COURSES (ENG, SPE, TESL)

ENG 5000.  Literacy in Context: Issues and Reform

Examinations of literacy issues from intersecting historical, global, psychological, socioeconomic, class, and curricular perspectives (including gender and race); the role of technology in literacy; theory, philosophy, and research into pedagogy addressing students’ exceptionalities and multiple intelligences; and how literacy professionals can provide leadership in the twenty-first century.  Credit, 3 semester hours.

ENG 5030. North Carolina Literature

Study of critically acclaimed fiction, drama, and poetry by North Carolina writers whose works are representative of contemporary Southern literature.  Writers may include Paul Green, Doris Betts, Clyde Edgerton, Kaye Gibbons, Lee Smith, Jill McCorkle, Tim McLaurin, A. R. Ammons.  Credit, 3 semester hours.

ENG 5050/AIS 5500. Native American Literature

Study of the historical and continuing contributions of Native American authors to literary studies, especially within the United States. Particular attention will be paid to the intersections of Euroamerican and Native American traditions. Topics covered may include, contemporary issues, oral and written traditions, identity, place, colonization, displacement, and differing world views. Credit, 3 semester hours.

ENG 5100. Rhetorical Grammar

Thorough study of advanced elements of English grammar, with emphasis on grammar knowledge as a rhetorical tool, to help writers understand grammatical choices available to them and the effects those choices have on readers.  Grammatical principles are applied to students’ own writing. Credit, 3 semester hours.

ENG 5110.  Principles of English Linguistics

A study of the English language as a system of rules operating at various levels (sound, word formation, syntax, and discourse) and how this system governs and explains our everyday use of the language.  The course will focus on English but will also include analysis of examples from other languages of the world for comparative purposes. Credit, 3 semester hours.

ENG 5200.  Issues in Contemporary American English

Study of the characteristic features of contemporary American English in print and non-print media, dynamic factors in linguistic change, and concerns about the state of American English today. Credit, 3 semester hours.

ENG 5210. Advanced Creative Writing

Study and extensive practice in a variety of literary genres such as fiction, poetry, script and/or play writing, children’s literature, and others. Workshop format. Credit, 3 semester hours.

SPE 5230. Spoken Communication

Study of the communication behaviors which influence our casual and business relationships.  Review of intrapersonal, interpersonal, interview, group discussion, and public communication. Credit, 3 semester hours.

ENG 5300.  Theories and Methods of Literary Research

Study of the major theoretical approaches to interpreting literature; application of research methodology to study of texts, periods, genres. Credit, 3 semester hours.

ENG 5440 Process Writing: Theory

Studies of the theoretical bases of process writing, especially those identified with The National Writing Project and The North Carolina Writing Project. Special attention to sequence in writing, writing to learn, and rhetoric; and to current research related to process writing, responding to and evaluating student writing. PREREQ: (1) Acceptance into North Carolina Writing Project at UNCP, (2) To be taken simultaneously with ENG 5450. Credit, 3 semester hours.

ENG 5450 Process Writing: Practicum

Applications of process writing, especially those identified with the National Writing Project and The North Carolina Writing Project. Special attention to heuristics, conferencing, and to current best practices, including collaborative learning/writing strategies and Writing Across the Curriculum. PREREQ: (1) Acceptance into the North Carolina Writing Project at UNCP, (2) To be taken simultaneously with ENG 5440.  Credit, 3 semester hours.

ENG 5500. Advanced Nonfiction Writing

Study and extensive practice in expository, persuasive writing, narrative, autobiographical and biographical forms.  Topics may include creative non-fiction and modern literary journalism. Credit, 3 semester hours.

ENG 5600. Americans in Paris

Study of works by American writers living and writing in Paris during the 1920's through 1950's and the ways in which the expatriate experience influenced American literature and literary modernism.  Writers may include Stein, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Wright, Baldwin, Miller, and the Beat poets.  Students may have the opportunity for travel to Paris for seven to ten days to visit the sites studied during the course. Credit, 3 semester hours.

ENG 5610.  Shakespeare Studies

An intensive study of Shakespeare and his work considering both Early Modern stage practice and Shakespeare's later cultural impact.  Course emphasis may vary to include such issues as gender, genre, race, adaptation, and performance.  The course may also provide an opportunity for a trip to Shakespeare's England.  Credit, 3 semester hours.

ENG 5750.  Film Studies

An investigation of film in its cultural, social, and historical contexts; the film text in its various configurations, including a discussion of film narrative, film techniques, film history, the development of the medium and the industry, as well as a study of theory, criticism, and analysis.  Topics may vary to include studies of critical methods, genre, directors, national cinema, and movements in film history. Credit, 3 semester hours.

ENG 5810.  Phonetics and Phonology

A study of the speech sounds that occur in the languages of the world will cover physiological properties of the speech producing apparatus, phonetic transcription using the international phonetic alphabet, and both theoretical and applied study of phonological patterns. Credit, 3 semester hours.

ENG 5830.  Second Language Acquisition

An in-depth study of both theoretical issues in second language acquisition and the practical application of theory in the ESL classroom, including  learning styles and strategies; the importance of affective factors and socio-cultural factors in language learning; contrastive analysis, interlanguage, and error analysis; and communicative competence.  Credit, 3 semester hours.

ENG 5850.  Cultural Issues of English as a Second Language

A study of important cultural issues relevant to the teaching and learning of English as a second language, including bilingualism, differences in cultural patterns of perception and thinking, differences in what is considered appropriate student behavior and appropriate teacher behavior in a variety of cultures, and cultural differences expressed in verbal and non-verbal behavior.  The importance of understanding and taking into account the cultural backgrounds of students in the teaching of ESL and the importance of teaching American culture as a part of ESL will also be considered.  Credit, 3 semester hours.

TESL 5890.  Applied Pedagogy of Teaching English as a Second Language

Following a review of the pedagogical fundamentals grounded in cognitive, affective, and linguistic principles of second language acquisition, this course will focus on the practical realities of the language classroom, including curriculum development, lesson planning, evaluation of students and programs, and classroom management.  Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ: ENG 3460, 3710, 5810, 5830, 5850.

C. ENGLISH SPECIAL TOPICS COURSES (ENGS)

ENGS 5000-5099.   Literary Topic Seminar

A seminar approach to the study of a particular, possibly interdisciplinary, topic in literary study.  Topics may include literary theory, literature and the arts, Biblical literature, literature and myth. Credit, 3 semester hours.

ENGS 5100-5199. Special Topics in Literacy

Study of significant contemporary figures such as Freire, Kozol, Ong, Villanueva, Bahktin, Heath; topics such as rhetorical theory, adult, and/or family literacy.  PREREQ: ENG 5000 recommended. Credit, 3 semester hours.

ENGS 5200-5299.   Literary Genre Seminar

A seminar approach to the study of a particular literary genre or sub-genre seen in its genesis, maturation, and subsequent influence; possible topics include Courtly Literature, Romantic Poetry, Modern Poetry, The Bildungsroman, The Short Story, Modern World Drama, The Epic. Credit, 3 semester hours.

ENGS 5300-5399.    Author Seminar

A seminar approach to the study of a literary figure whose substantial literary corpus may be investigated through primary texts, major scholarship, theoretical approaches, and bibliographical and textual study   that situate the author within a particular literary, historical, or cultural framework. Credit, 3 semester hours.

ENGS 5400-5499.   Literary Period Seminar

A seminar approach to the study of a significant period of American, British, or world literature; texts are examined for the characteristics that define the period and as evidence of literary, historical, and cultural contexts. Possible periods for study are Medieval British Literature, English Romanticism, Literature of the English Renaissance, American Transcendentalism, American Literary Realism, Eighteenth Century Studies, and the Victorian Age. Credit, 3 semester hours.

ENGS 5700-5799.  Expanding Canon Seminar  

A seminar approach to the study of a significant author, topic, period, or genre related to the expanding canon.  The focus of this course might include Native American, African-American, Asian American, Women’s, Latino/a, Post Colonial, regional, working-class, or other literatures. Credit, 3 semester hours.

D. THESIS

ENG 6010.  Three-Credit Thesis

A research paper produced during one semester, of at least 25-30 pages, that substantially develops through extensive revision a research paper that earned an A in a course taken during the student’s first 21 hours in the Master of Arts in English Education; expanded research and writing under the direction of a faculty advisor (in whose course the original paper was submitted) and second reader who schedule meetings and submission of work throughout the semester. Must be taken in every fall or spring semester once thesis work is begun until such time as the thesis has been successfully defended. Graded on a Satisfactory (Pass)/Unsatisfactory (Fail) basis. PREREQ: Completion of 21 hours of graduate work. Credit, 3 semester hours.

ENG 6020. Six-Credit Thesis I

The first of two courses leading to a research paper of at least 40-60 pages, produced during two successive semesters, on a topic the student has not yet explored in a research paper previously submitted in a course taken during the student’s first 21 hours in the Master of Arts in English Education; extensive, focused research and writing under the direction of a faculty advisor and two other graduate faculty members who schedule the student’s meetings and submission of work. ENG 6020 earns a grade of Satisfactory (Pass) upon the student’s successful review of relevant primary and secondary sources culminating in an acceptable annotated bibliography and prospectus. Must be taken in every fall or spring semester once thesis work is begun until such time as the prospectus has been successfully submitted. Graded on a Satisfactory (Pass)/Unsatisfactory (Fail) basis.  Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ: Completion of 21 hours of graduate work.

ENG 6030. Six-Credit Thesis II

The second of two courses leading to a research paper of at least 40-60 pages, produced during two successive semesters, on a topic the student has not yet explored in a research paper previously submitted in a course taken during the student’s first 21 hours in the Master of Arts in English Education; extensive, focused research and writing under the direction of a faculty advisor and two other graduate faculty members who schedule the student’s meetings and submission of work. ENG 6030 consists of the student’s drafting, revising, and submitting the completed, successful thesis to earn a grade of Satisfactory (Pass). Must be taken in every fall or spring semester after the prospectus has been submitted until such time as the thesis has been successfully defended. Graded on a Satisfactory (Pass)/Unsatisfactory (Fail) basis.  Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ: Completion of 21 hours of graduate work.

E. INTERNSHIP (Courses required for M.A.T. candidates; see MAT Program Handbook.)

EED 5810.  Internship in Secondary English Education

Ten week, full-time internship experiences in an off-campus public school setting appropriate for 9-12 English licensure.  Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ:  Approval of the English Education Program Director.

TESL 5810.  Internship in TESOL

Ten week, full-time internship experiences in an off-campus public school setting appropriate for K-12 ESL licensure.  Credit, 3 semester hours.  PREREQ:  Approval of the English Education Program Director.

 

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