2013-14 CATALOG

TEACHER  EDUCATION  PROGRAM

Director: Zoe W. Locklear

 

Theme: Preparing professional educators who are committed, collaborative, and competent

Mary Ash 21, Valerie A. Austin14, Scott C. Billingsley24, Betty Wells Brown4,17, Alfred Bryant27, Danny Davis16, Kimberly Dial Sellers18, Denise Feikema7, Kelly Ficklin 5, Karen Granger1, Rita Hagevik22,  Ann Horton-Lopez3, Mary Klinikowski10, 28, Roger A. Ladd8, Ana Cecilia Lara25, Raymond Lee11, Tulla Lightfoot2, Zoe Locklear12, Jeffrey K. Lucas23, Larry Mabe20, Kay McClanahan9, Aku Opata31, José Rivera13, Marisa Scott26, Denny Scruton15, Karen Stanley6, Jeffrey Warren19, Bryan Winters30, vacant29

 

1Academically Intellectually Gifted (AO)

12Middle Grades Education (G)

23Social Studies Education (U)

2Art Education (U)

13Music Education (U)

24Social Studies Education (G)

3Art Education (G)

14Music Education (G)

25Spanish Licensure (U)

4Birth to Kindergarten (U)

15Health/Physical Education (U)

26Special Education (U)

5Elementary Education (U)

16Physical Education (G)

27Associate Dean

6Elementary Education (G)

17Pre-School (AO)

28Director of Assessment

7English Education (U)

18Reading Education (G)

29Director of Teacher Recruitment

8English Education (G)

19School Counseling (G)

30Dir. of Univ.-School Partnerships

9English as Second Language (AO)

20School Administration (G)

31Licensure Officer

10Mathematics Education (U)

21Science Education (U)

 

11Mathematics Education (G)

22Science Education (G)

 

 

 (U) = Undergraduate;  (G) = Graduate;  (AO) = Add-On

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               

Teacher Education Program Vision Statement

By holding ourselves to high standards of professional excellence and professional integrity, by caring for the personal and professional well-being of the teacher candidates in our undergraduate community and the career professionals in our graduate community, we will make sound judgments about the design and delivery of professional development programs in an environment of mutual trust and common commitment to public school children and their families.

 

Teacher Education Program Mission Statement

Believing that the quality of education directly influences the quality of life both for those served and for those serving, the UNC Pembroke Teacher Education Program has as its mission to develop and nurture competent and caring communities of public school professionals who dedicate themselves to the education and welfare of all students and whose understanding of the dynamic interrelationship among theory, practice, and reflection compels them to actively influence positive change with sensitivity and integrity.  The UNCP Teacher Education Program shares the University’s commitment to academic excellence, cultural diversity, and lifelong learning within a balanced program of teaching, research, and service.

 

Teacher Education Program Diversity Position Statement

In congruence with the mission of the University of North Carolina at Pembroke in providing the setting and environment for the University experience and to graduate students prepared for global citizenry, the Teacher Education Program at UNCP is committed to the development of educators who embrace the diversity of ideas, learning styles, racial and ethnic differences, and gender issues and who possess the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to promote living and learning in a global society.  To this accomplishment the Teacher Education Program will seek to

 

1.       recruit students from diverse backgrounds, cultures, and races;

2.       recruit faculties from diverse populations who possess a knowledge base for teaching diverse populations;

3.       develop, teach, and assess a curriculum that embraces learning and teaching for diverse populations; and,

4.       provide (field) experiences and clinical settings which enable students to test, adapt, and adopt paradigms of learning for diverse populations.

 

Basic Tenets of the Conceptual Framework

The UNCP Teacher Education Program is committed to the public school mission of preparing P-12 learners for full participation in a democratic society.  We believe that all P-12 learners are entitled to the highest quality instruction, services, resources, and facilities that society can provide.  UNCP’s primary responsibility in that noble effort is to prepare competent and collaborative professional educators committed to the democratic mission in public education.

 

Commitment

Public schools exist for the purpose of making equal access a reality for all children regardless of race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, language, gender, religion, sexual orientation, or exceptionality.  Success in school is critical to the quality of future life for individuals as well as the health and vitality of our democratic nation. Therefore, professional educators—classroom teachers, specialists, administrators, and school counselors—significantly influence the shape of that future for P-12 learners in our nation’s public schools.  Such serious responsibility for the well-being of others requires an equally serious commitment from professional educators on several levels.

 

First, professional educators must be committed to the mission of public schooling in a culturally diverse, democratic society.  Professional educators respect the dignity of all children, their families, their cultures, and their communities and care deeply about each child’s academic success, health, and well-being.  Second, professional educators must be committed to high standards for students.  Professional educators believe that all students can learn and set high expectations for all learners.  They create safe, secure, and supportive learning environments designed to meet the needs of diverse learners.  Third, professional educators must be committed to high standards for themselves. They are personally invested in their professional work and continuously engaged in critical self-reflection about their own effectiveness at performing that work.  They are committed to lifelong learning and continuous professional development over the span of a career.  Fourth, professional educators are committed to the profession.  They are proud to serve their communities as educational leaders and advocate for the profession in all interactions.  They affiliate with various professional organizations at the district, state, and national levels.

 

Collaboration

Public schooling is a complex social institution involving multiple branches of local, state, and national governments, the general public, special interest groups, numerous national professional organizations, accreditation agencies, business partners, civic organizations, and millions of classroom teachers, administrators, service professionals, specialists, support staff, students and their families.  Collaboration among all of the stakeholders in public education is essential for success.  The UNCP Teacher Education Program nurtures the development of professional educators who understand the importance of collaboration in the public school culture and who work productively with others in various collaborative endeavors for the welfare of ­P-12 learners.

 

Professional educators must collaborate with others in the community of learners.  They understand the constructivist principle of creating shared knowledge, learn how to work as a team on group projects in their classes, and develop a repertoire of cooperative learning strategies.  Professional educators must learn how to collaborate with other professionals in the school community.  They plan collaboratively with cooperating teachers, grade-level teams, resource teachers, curriculum specialists, and embrace opportunities to team teach.  Experienced professionals lead collaborative efforts for whole school improvement.  Professional educators collaborate with students’ families and other caregivers.  They understand that the partnership between school and home has a positive impact on the child’s success in school.  They communicate regularly with parents about what is going on in the school and invite them to actively participate in the school community.  Professional educators collaborate with others in the community.  They secure partnerships with businesses, civic organizations, nonprofit groups, and committed individuals in the district, state, and nation to support special educational initiatives for the benefit of P-12 learners.

 

Competence

The UNCP Teacher Education Program prepares professional educators who are competent.  They possess the knowledge, skills, and dispositions needed to perform their entry level and advanced roles and responsibilities in the public schools effectively.  Competent professional educators promote positive learning outcomes for ALL students.  Understanding the critical connections among theory, research, and practice, their work is grounded in a defensible, well-developed conceptual framework based on the tenets of constructivism.  Competent professional educators know how to use critical self-reflection on those connections to learn from direct experience and continuously improve their effectiveness.  They know how to secure and use various technological resources to enhance student learning, service delivery, communication, and administration.  Competent professional educators embrace cultural diversity.  They know the students for whom they are responsible and how to accommodate the needs of diverse learners in a positive, caring environment.  They value the role of the family in the child’s education and know how to work cooperatively with parents and other caregivers for the child’s benefit. Competent professional educators provide leadership wherever it is needed, always alert for opportunities to use their individual strengths to promote public education and those it serves.

 

Specific guidelines for defining professional competence are prescribed by the North Carolina State Board of Education, as the body authorized to govern licensure credentials for professional educators, and The University of North Carolina Board of Governors, the body authorized to govern the award of academic degrees for the University of North Carolina system.  North Carolina State licensure requirements are aligned with the professional organization standards of the respective licensure area.  Specific guidelines defining professional competence are also prescribed by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), an external accreditation agency.

 

In summary, UNC Pembroke prepares committed, collaborative, and competent professional educators who are responsive to equity and diversity; who are knowledgeable, effective, and reflective; and who provide leadership in the classroom, school, and profession.

 

Teacher Education Program Organization

The Teacher Education Program at UNCP is a cross-disciplinary program, governed by the Teacher Education Committee and administered by the Dean, School of Education.  Some licensure areas or majors are housed in the School of Education and some are housed in their respective academic departments in the College of Arts and Sciences. Information about Teacher Education Program policies and procedures, licensure and testing requirements, special programs, and resources appears in this section.   

 

Teacher Education Program Committee

The Teacher Education Committee is the University-wide committee responsible for overseeing all teacher education programs. Its specific functions include establishing teacher education policies, reviewing all proposed changes to teacher education curriculum, reviewing proposed teacher education programs, reviewing the professional studies component of the program, approving applicants to the Teacher Education Program, approving applicants for the professional semester, assuring compliance with state and national accreditation standards, and considering other matters related to teacher education.  For a comprehensive description of the Teacher Education Committee organization and function, see the Teacher Education Program Policy Manual and the UNCP Faculty Handbook.

 

Accreditation and Licensure

All teacher education licensure programs are accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), and the North Carolina State Board of Education.  The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction issues licenses to teach in the public schools of North Carolina.  Requirements for licensure are established by the NC State Board of Education and are subject to change.  Accreditation provides for reciprocal licensure with other states that recognize interstate reciprocity agreements.

 

NC State Licensure Examination Requirement

All persons qualifying for licensure in North Carolina in the areas of Elementary Education, Birth-to-Kindergarten Education, and Special Education must pass the designated Praxis II specialty area test(s), as required. Alternative licensure teachers must meet Praxis II requirements as defined by current NC State Board of Education policy. See the program director for information about licensure exam requirements for graduate programs.

The School of Education must receive an official copy of satisfactory scores before a recommendation for licensure can be forwarded to the NC State Department of Public Instruction. Candidates should have their scores sent directly to the University by the testing company. Candidate copies are not accepted. Applications and information about the Praxis II tests are available at the Educational Testing Service website at www.ets.org.

 

Alternative Routes to Licensure

The UNCP Teacher Education Program offers two alternative pathways to licensure:

·         Licensure-only—available in all licensure areas offered by the unit

·         Master of Arts in Teaching Program—specializations in art education, middle grades education, music education, physical education and secondary English education, mathematics education, science  education, and social studies education.  More information about this pathway is included in the graduate program reports.

 

Licensure‑Only

The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction issues licenses to teach in the public schools.  Individuals who already possess a baccalaureate degree must satisfy individually determined requirements for licensure based on previous study and professional experiences.  Candidates must apply to UNCP and must have earned a degree from a regionally accredited college or university. In determining requirements for licensure-only candidates, consideration will be given to alternative means of demonstrating the knowledge and competencies for licensure.  Licensure-only students are subject to the same Teacher Education Program admission and continuation regulations as degree‑seeking students.  Additional information is available from the School of Education.

Licensure-only candidates who have an overall Quality Point Average (QPA) of 2.5 at the time the degree was awarded may request a Plan of Study (POS) that is developed based upon his/her educational background and intended licensure area. Official transcripts from each institution attended must accompany the request. Based upon review of the transcript(s) by the School of Education Licensure Office and the appropriate program coordinator, a Plan of Study is developed. Upon successful completion of the prescribed POS, the student may apply for licensure recommendation from The University of North Carolina at Pembroke.

An In-Focus Plan of Study is for licensure-only students who do not have an overall QPA of 2.5 at the time the degree was awarded. Eligibility requirements for an In-Focus Plan of Study are as follows:

·         hold at least a bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited college or university;

·         meet the state established scores on Praxis I, SAT, or ACT;

·         have an overall grade point average of 3.0 on a minimum of fifteen (15) semester hours of coursework taken at UNCP relative to licensure (professional studies core, content pedagogy, and essential standards);

·         complete a Request for a Plan of Study (POS) form;

·         submit an official transcript.

To be admitted into the Teacher Education Program, In-Focus students must have:

1.                       earned a "C" or better in EDN 2100 (Introduction to Education);

2.                       earned a grade of at least a "C-" ("C" if the course was repeated) in all required professional studies core, content pedagogy, and essential standards courses completed at the time of admission;

3.                       at least a 2.5 cumulative QPA on a 4.0 scale on all prior college/university course work;

4.                       satisfactorily completed an admission to the Teacher Education Program interview and;

5.                       completed a Candidate for Professional Licensure (CPL) form.

An alternative to the QPA requirement (#3 above) provides that In-Focus students must have:

·                     earned a QPA of 3.0 on a minimum of fifteen (15) hours of course work taken at UNCP relative to licensure (professional studies core, content pedagogy, and essential standards).

Another option available for licensure-only students is to have a Plan of Study developed by one of North Carolina’s Regional Alternative Licensure Centers (RALCs).  The Plan of Study includes a list of competency areas that the candidate must fulfill to clear his/her license. Upon completion of the specified requirements, the candidate may be recommended for licensure by the RALC. In order for licensure-only students to take courses at UNCP, the candidate must complete an application, which is available from the School of Education website (www.uncp.edu/soe) or from the School of Education Licensure Office. Candidates who have a Plan of Study through RALC will not be eligible for licensure recommendation from UNC Pembroke.  Candidates should contact their Local Education Agency (LEA) when they are ready to clear their license.

 

Special Resources and Facilities

The Curriculum Laboratory: The Curriculum Laboratory, housed in the Educational Center, is an essential part of the Teacher Education Program. It contains professional and instructional materials supporting all licensure programs in the Teacher Education Program. The Laboratory has textbooks used in P - 12 schools with supporting technological resources, teaching units, North Carolina Standard Course of Study, instructional media and equipment, professional journals, curriculum outlines, Praxis I review materials, and equipment and resources for the construction of instructional materials.

 

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO UNDERGRADUATE INITIAL TEACHER LICENSURE PROGRAMS

Standards for Undergraduate Initial Teacher Licensure Programs

The Teacher Education Program is designed to prepare all undergraduate candidates to meet or exceed the North Carolina Professional Teaching Standards adopted by the Teacher Education Committee in collaboration with public school partners. The Standards are presented in the UNCP Teacher Education Program Teacher Candidate Handbook, the Teacher Education Policy Manual, the Teacher Education Program Internship Handbook, and the Teacher Education Program website. 

 

Curriculum for Undergraduate Initial Teacher Licensure Programs

The program of study, or curriculum, for undergraduate teacher education majors is comprised of four components:  General Education, Essential Standards (major), Professional Studies Core, and Content Pedagogy.  A fifth component, academic concentration, is required in some programs of study (see following section). The General Education component includes study of the fine arts, literature, history, philosophy/religion, the social sciences, the natural sciences, mathematics, and physical education.  The Essential Standards (major/licensure area) component is designed to provide in-depth understanding, skills, and knowledge specific to the chosen specialty/licensure area.  The Professional Studies Core component includes study of the historical, social, psychological, and philosophical foundations of education; human growth and development; ethics; learning theories; curriculum; instruction; exceptional, diverse, and at-risk children; content-area literacy; and the integration of instructional technology.  The Content Pedagogy component is designed to help the candidate learn how to teach content to public school students at the targeted age and grade level.  The culminating professional development experience for prospective teachers is the senior internship (student teaching) under the direct supervision of a master teacher in a clinical setting. 

Outlines of the requirements for each program area (major) follow and may also be found in the catalog sections for the respective academic departments.

 

Special Requirement for Undergraduate Initial Teacher Licensure Programs:  Academic or Professional Concentration

As required by the Board of Governors of The University of North Carolina, all students seeking a baccalaureate degree in Elementary Education or Physical Education must complete an academic or professional concentration in a basic academic discipline as part of their degree requirements. Students seeking a baccalaureate degree in Special Education must complete an academic or professional concentration as required by the UNCP Teacher Education Program.  Students seeking a baccalaureate degree in Middle Grades Education must complete an academic or professional concentration, in addition to one teaching specialty area, as part of their degree requirements. The 18‑27 hours comprising these academic and professional concentrations have been selected to provide students with a cohesive study of a basic academic discipline.  Academic and professional concentrations are available in American Indian Studies, Art, Biology, English, Exercise and Sport Science, Geography, Geology, History, Mathematics, Music, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Reading, Spanish, Special Education, and Sociology. Students may choose a second major of 30 hours in Philosophy and Religion rather than an academic or professional concentration. Academic and professional concentration requirements are listed with the respective department. 

 

Declaration of Major and Advising

As soon as the student decides to major in teacher education, a Declaration of Major Form should be completed, including securing the required signatures, and submitted to the Office of the Registrar in Lumbee Hall.  The form is then processed, and an advisor in the chosen program area is assigned.  A major advisor is critical to a student’s timely and efficient progress through the Teacher Education Program. 

 

Admission to the Teacher Education Program

The Teacher Education Committee selectively admits and periodically evaluates students in the Teacher Education Program on the basis of scholastic aptitude and suitability for teaching. Admission into the University as a student does not automatically satisfy eligibility requirements for admission to the Teacher Education Program. Eligibility for admission into the Teacher Education Program will be determined by regulations current at the time initial application is made for admission into the program. 

To be eligible for consideration by the Teacher Education Committee and approved for admission to the Teacher Education Program, each candidate must:

1. Have not more than 9 hours of the General Education requirements remaining.

2. Have earned a “C” (2.0) or better in EDN 2100 (Introduction to Education) or the approved equivalent course(s).

3. Have earned a grade of at least a “C‑” (C if the course was repeated) in all required professional studies core, content pedagogy, and essential standards courses completed at the time of admission, with the exception of EDN 2100, which requires a grade of “C.”

4. Have at least a 2.5 cumulative Quality Point Average (QPA) on a 4.0 scale on all prior college/university course work.

5. Meet the state established scores on Praxis I, SAT, or ACT. An official copy of the scores must be sent to UNCP. Students must meet the scores in effect at the time they apply to and qualify for admission to the Teacher Education Program [see next section for details].

6. Satisfactorily complete an admission interview after completing all the above requirements.

7. Complete a Candidate for Professional Licensure (CPL) form.   CPL forms are available in the School of Education Licensure Office and on the School of Education website.

Students with disabilities who may require special accommodations should consult the Dean of the School of Education.

Students should apply for admission to the Teacher Education Program when all of the requirements for admission have been met. Applications are available in the School of Education Licensure Office and on the School of Education website.  (LIMITED PROGRESSION NOTE: Formal admission to the Teacher Education Program is a prerequisite for enrollment in many professional studies core, content pedagogy, and essential standards courses.)

Students will receive written notification from the School of Education that their application for the Teacher Education Program is approved or disapproved by the Teacher Education Committee.  A student is not considered admitted to the Teacher Education Program until such notification is received.

 

Testing Requirement for Admission to the Teacher Education Program

State law requires that an undergraduate student seeking a degree in teacher education must attain passing scores on a pre-professional skills test prior to admission to an approved teacher education program in a North Carolina college or university.  Students seeking admission to the Teacher Education Program must satisfactorily complete the Praxis I Series, which includes subtests in reading, writing, and mathematics, or achieve the state established scores on the SAT or the ACT that allow individuals to be exempt from Praxis I testing requirements. Students must meet the required scores in effect at the time they apply to and qualify for admission to the Teacher Education Program. The School of Education must receive an official copy of the scores before the student may be admitted to the Teacher Education Program.  Student copies of scores are not acceptable. For more information about testing requirements or other requirements for admission to the Teacher Education Program, students should contact the School of Education.

 

Continuation in the Teacher Education Program

If a candidate earns a course grade lower than “C‑” in an professional studies core, content pedagogy, and essential standards course; if a candidate’s quality point average falls below a 2.5; or if a candidate’s application for admission to the Professional Semester of the Teacher Education Program is disapproved for any reason, the candidate is suspended from the Teacher Education Program. Candidates suspended from the program may not continue to progress in the program until the deficiencies are corrected. Required professional studies core, content pedagogy, and essential standards courses in which a grade lower than a “C‑” was earned must be repeated and a grade of “C” (2.0) or better must be earned. Upon correction of the deficiencies, candidates suspended from the program must request reinstatement in writing from the School of Education.

 

Enrollment in the Professional Semester

Enrollment in the Professional Semester is the culminating experience of the UNCP undergraduate Teacher Education Program. To be eligible for consideration by the Teacher Education Committee and approved for enrollment in the professional semester, each candidate must:

1. Be formally admitted to the Teacher Education Program one full semester (excluding summer sessions) prior to the professional semester.

2. Have not more than six (6) hours remaining of degree requirements at the beginning of the professional semester, excluding those required in the professional semester.

3. The remaining hours shall not include professional studies core or content pedagogy courses.  If the remaining hours include essential standards courses, the courses must be approved by the Program Coordinator and the Dean of the School of Education. 

4.  Upon approval by the Program Coordinator and Dean of the School of Education, the remaining hours taken during the professional semester must be scheduled at the conclusion of the school day, online or during weekends.

5. Have an overall quality point average of 2.5 (on a 4.0 scale) or better as well as a 2.5 or better in the candidate’s major field of study.

Two semesters prior to the internship, each candidate must complete the professional semester enrollment packet, including but not limited to the following items: 

1. Advisor’s Recommendation for Professional Semester form signed by the candidate’s advisor, program coordinator, and respective department chairperson.

2. North Carolina Public School Health Examination Certificate and the UNCP Health Services Verification form.

3. Registrar’s Statement and Application for Degree form.

4. A résumé.

Candidates with disabilities who may require special accommodations during the Professional Semester should contact the Director of University-School Programs.

Candidates will receive written notification from University-School Programs that their enrollment application was approved or disapproved by the Teacher Education Committee. A candidate is not officially enrolled in the Professional Semester until such notification is made AND all University registration procedures are completed.

 

Removal from an Internship Placement

When all reasonable attempts to rectify an unsatisfactory situation fail, the following options may be considered:

·    Change of placement

·    Voluntary withdrawal (grade of “W”)

·    Failure of internship (grade of “F”) or involuntary withdrawal (grade of “W”)

·    Extension of placement (grade of “I”)

The Dean of the School of Education selects an appropriate resolution in consultation with the vested parties to include, but not limited to:  public school representative(s) from the host school district, the intern’s Program Coordinator, the University Supervisor, the Director of University-School Partnerships, and the intern.  The vested parties may recommend the assignment of “withdrawal,” “fail,” or “incomplete” for the internship semester to the professor of record for (a) change of placement, (b) failure or involuntary withdrawal, or (c) extension of placement.  The University is in no way obligated to support or accommodate an intern whose conduct violates professional ethics or codes of conduct as defined by the Code of Ethics for NC Educators and the Teacher Education Program Candidate Standards.  (See current Student Intern Handbook for additional information.)

 

Graduation

Students must apply for graduation.  Applications, which are available in the Registrar’s Office, must be submitted at least two semesters before graduation (April 1st of the prior year is the deadline for December graduation; November 1st of the prior year is the deadline for May graduation).  Application for graduation is a University policy, separate from any Teacher Education Program policies and procedures.

 

Time Limit Policy

Students will have five years from the date of completing course work toward licensure to be recommended by UNCP for initial licensure. After five years have lapsed, a student’s program of study will be reviewed and additional course work may be required before a recommendation will be made for initial licensure.

 

Residency Requirements for Teacher Education Programs

Undergraduate students enrolled in one of the licensure programs in teacher education at UNCP will complete a minimum of 30 semester hours (2 semesters) of course work at the University prior to enrollment in the professional semester.

 

Transfer Credit for Professional Education Courses

Upon the review and approval from the School of Education, up to nine (9) hours transfer credit may be granted for education courses. For each course for which transfer credit is sought, the student must furnish an official transcript from the institution at which the course was taken. Transfer credit will be accepted only from two‑ and four‑year colleges and universities with teacher education programs approved by at least one of the following: (1) North Carolina State Board of Education; (2) National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE); (3) Teacher Education Accreditation Council (TEAC); or (4) appropriate regional accrediting agencies, such as the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.

 

UNDERGRADUATE LICENSURE PROGRAMS

NOTE:  Students who desire teacher licensure in any one of the programs outlined below should declare the major as soon as possible in their college career. Consultation with the Program Coordinator or program advisor prior to registering for General Education courses is strongly recommended.           

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ART EDUCATION (K-12)

Coordinator: Tulla Lightfoot        Location:  Department of Art

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

The program of study in Art Education consists of four curricular components: freshman seminar and general education, the essential standards, the professional studies core, and content pedagogy. Upon successful completion of the program and related requirements, graduates are eligible for a Standard Professional I license to teach in the State of North Carolina.  The NC Department of Public Instruction issues the teaching license based on University recommendation.

The Art Education program is one of 12 teacher education programs offered at UNCP. Art Education majors are subject to Teacher Education Program policies, admission requirements, continuation requirements, and graduation requirements. For more information about teacher education policies and requirements, turn to the previous section.

The Art Education program is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the NC State Board of Education.

PROGRAM STANDARDS 

The Teacher Education Program standards for all education majors are described fully in the UNCP Teacher Education Program Teacher Candidate Handbook.

PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

One goal of the Art Education program is to help prospective art educators develop art insight and technical competence in their chosen area of study as well as groundwork for special interests and needs.  Prospective art educators must also demonstrate professional awareness and communication skills concerning their discipline.   They must be proficient as art instructors at all grade levels and have a philosophical basis for planning and implementing curricula in a pluralistic society.  Students must be able to evaluate art products and procedures and defend their evaluations. More specifically, prospective art educators will:

1.  attain a high level of visual literacy of history, criticism, aesthetics and production of art throughout their endeavors of art (art education), beginning to carry out the integration of these four disciplines through the activities of inquiry, production, observation and practice;

2.  become familiar with traditional and contemporary art education movements, theories, and issues, demonstrating knowledge of the fundamental principles and the language of art as part of their art theory instruction;

3.  possess a comprehensive and integrated understanding of the visual arts, crafts, and art history;

4.  be knowledgeable about the various techniques, materials, and studio procedures of art production and be able to translate those processes into sequentially based curricula for diverse learners;

5.  gain knowledge, in the classroom and during field experiences, of the structure, procedures, and processes found in schools as related to the special area of art education;

6.  know and understand the developmental stages (both cognitive and affective domains) and be able to structure lessons that are developmentally appropriate; and

7.  take an active role in instructional planning, presentation, the uses of instructional technology, and assessment, taking into consideration the diversity of the population.

      

Course Requirements

Sem. Hrs.

Freshman Seminar and General Education

45

Essential Standards

ART 1010 Elements of Design

ART 1020 Three-Dimensional  Design or ART 1050 Introduction to Sculpture

ART 1110 Ceramics: Introduction to Hand Building

ART 1320 Introduction to Drawing

ART 1330 Introduction to Painting

ART 1400 Introduction to Printmaking

ART 1500 Introduction to Digital Arts

ART 2150    Figure Drawing

ART 2500 Intermediate Digital Arts

ART 2080 Survey of Art I

ART 2090 Survey of Art II

ART 4031    Professional Art Practices

ART 4330    Contemporary Art History

Advanced Studio Concentration – 6 hours

45

Professional Studies Core

EDN 2100 Introduction to Education

EDN 3130 Content Area Reading

EDN 3150 Developmental Perspectives of Educational Psychology   

SED 3310 Introduction to the Exceptional Child

12

Content Pedagogy

ART 3050 Art Education in Grades K-6

ART 3080 Art Education Methods and Field Experience, 6-12

ART 3090 Cultural Awareness and Production in Art Education

ART 4000 Art Education Curriculum

ART 4490 Internship

21

Guided Art Electives

3

 

Total:  126

 

 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIRTH-KINDERGARTEN EDUCATION (B-K)

Coordinator: Betty Wells Brown            Location:  Department of Education Specialties

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

The program of study in Birth-to-Kindergarten Education consists of four curricular components: freshman seminar and general education, the professional studies core, the essential standards area, and content pedagogy (methods and internship).  Upon successful completion of the program and related requirements, graduates are eligible for a Standard Professional I license to teach in the State of North Carolina.  The NC Department of Public Instruction issues the teaching license based on University recommendation.

The Birth-to-Kindergarten Education program is one of 12 teacher education programs offered at UNCP. Birth-to-Kindergarten Education majors are subject to Teacher Education Program policies, admission requirements, continuation requirements, and graduation requirements. For more information about teacher education policies and requirements, turn to the previous section.

The Birth-to-Kindergarten Education program is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the NC State Board of Education.

PROGRAM STANDARDS 

The Teacher Education Program standards for all education majors are described fully in the UNCP Teacher Education Program Teacher Candidate Handbook.

NORTH CAROLINA BIRTH-KINDERGARTEN PROGRAM STANDARDS

The goals of the Birth-Kindergarten program are to prepare preservice and inservice Birth-Kindergarten professionals with the knowledge, skills, and dispositions needed to effectively serve infants, toddlers, preschoolers, and their families in diverse settings.  Our program is based on the following six standards as established by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. 

The successful Birth-Kindergarten professional will

1.       have a comprehensive knowledge of typical as well as atypical patterns of child development;

2.       foster relationships with families that support children’s development and learning;

3.       build community partnerships in support of children and families;

4.       use authentic, ongoing assessment of children’s abilities in order to plan,  implement, and evaluate programs that build upon each child’s unique strengths;

5.       create and adapt environments and intentionally plan and implement an integrated curriculum that facilitates every child’s construction of knowledge and provides a strong foundation for lifelong learning;

6.       provide an integrated curriculum derived from Infant-Toddler Guidelines, Foundations for Early Learning, and the Kindergarten Standard Course of Study which includes the following areas: emotional/social development; physical development, health, nutrition, and safety; and cognitive development.

 

Course Requirements

Sem. Hrs.

Freshman Seminar and General Education

45

Professional Studies Core

EDN 2100 Introduction to Education

ECE 2030 The Developing Young Child     

SED 3310 Introduction to the Exceptional Child

9

Essential Standards

EDN 2900 Research and Writing in Education

ECE 2020 Foundations of Early Childhood Education

ECE 2040 The Child as Teacher                                                                                  

ECE 2050 Young Children and Families in a Diverse World

ECE 3110 Behaviors and Environments for Early Childhood Education

ECE 3120 Community Partnerships with Families and Agencies

ECE 3130 Early Childhood Educators as Leaders

ECE 3140 Health Issues in Birth-Kindergarten Education

24

Content Pedagogy

ECE 4010 Integrated Curricula and Appropriate Practices: Infants and Toddlers

ECE 4020 Integrated Curricula and Appropriate Practices:  Preschoolers   

ECE 4030 Integrated Curricula and Appropriate Practices: Kindergarteners

ECE 4040 Differentiation, Individualization and Universal Design   

ECE 4050 Practicum I

ECE 4060 Assessment Strategies and Application                                                                                   

ECE 4070 Practicum II

ECE 4460 Internship in Birth-Kindergarten Programs

ECE 4750 Professional Seminar for Pre-service Birth-Kindergarten Teachers

35

Electives

15

 

Total:  128

 

PRESCHOOL ADD-ON LICENSURE

Preschool Add-on licensure is available to individuals holding a clear license in Elementary Education, Family and Consumer Sciences, or Special Education. Plans of study, approximately 12-18 hours of coursework, are tailored to meet the needs of individuals with licensure in each of the three areas of study. Consult the School of Education Licensure Office for further details.

 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION (K-6)

Coordinator: Kelly Ficklin       Location:  Department of Elementary Education

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

The program of study in Elementary Education consists of five curricular components: freshman seminar and general education, the professional studies core, the essential standards area, content pedagogy, and academic concentration. Upon successful completion of the program and related requirements, graduates are eligible for a Standard Professional I license to teach in the State of North Carolina.  The NC Department of Public Instruction issues the teaching license based on University recommendation.

The Elementary Education program is one of 12 teacher education programs offered at UNCP. Elementary Education majors are subject to Teacher Education Program policies, admission requirements, continuation requirements, and graduation requirements. For more information about teacher education policies and requirements, turn to the previous section.

The Elementary Education program is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the NC State Board of Education.

PROGRAM STANDARDS 

The Teacher Education Program standards for all education majors are described fully in the UNCP Teacher Education Program Teacher Candidate Handbook.

PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

The goal of the Elementary Education program is to guide the professional development of teacher candidates who are morally and ethically committed to the learning, development, and well-being of all elementary children and who possess the knowledge, skills, and dispositions needed to guide the cognitive, social, emotional, and physical development of diverse learners in ways that inspire, engage, and affirm.  The specific objectives for elementary education candidates are delineated in the UNCP Teacher Education Program Teacher Candidate Handbook.  Briefly, the objectives of the program are

1.  to develop a broad, informed worldview sensitive to the values and perspectives of diverse peoples;

2.  to acquire the key concepts and tools of inquiry in the science disciplines, the literary disciplines, the social studies disciplines, the physical education and health disciplines,  and the arts disciplines;

3.  to acquire knowledge of the theories and principles of human growth and development;

4.  to understand the major determinants of curriculum in the elementary schools, including the Common Core and Essential Standards;

5.  to know how to plan instruction and employ a variety of instructional strategies including technology to meet the needs of diverse learners;

6.  to understand the role of assessment in cycles of teaching and learning and to develop the disposition to reflect critically and integrate knowledge and experience into a coherent conceptual framework.

 

Course Requirements

Sem. Hrs.

Freshman Seminar and General Education

45

Professional Studies Core

EDN 2100 Introduction to Education

SED 3310 Introduction to the Exceptional Child

6

 

Essential Standards

ELE 2010 Child Development and Cultural Dynamics

ELE 2020 Health and Wellness Awareness

ELE 2030 Arts Integration in the Elementary School

ELE 2900 Research and Writing in Elementary Education

ELE 4010 Mathematics and Science I

ELE 4020 Mathematics and Science II

ELE 4030 Living in a Global Society

ELE 4040 Literacy and Language Arts I in the Elementary School

ELE 4050 Literacy and Language Arts II in the Elementary School

HST 3170 North Carolina History

30

Content Pedagogy

ELE 3010 Differentiated Instruction for Today’s Learners

ELE 3020 Classroom Design and Management

ELE 3030 Purposeful Assessment for Learning

ELE 4060 Internship in Elementary Education

ELE 4070 Professional Seminar in Elementary Education

21

Academic or Professional Concentration (The number of hours may vary depending upon student’s choice of concentration. Hours may overlap with some General Education courses.  The student should plan the concentration in consultation with advisor.)

18

Guided Electives

8

 

Total:  128

 

 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ENGLISH

     SECONDARY EDUCATION 9-12 CONCENTRATION and
     MIDDLE GRADES LANGUAGE ARTS 6-9 CONCENTRATION

Coordinator: Denise Feikema                 Location:  Department of English, Theatre, and Foreign Languages

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

The program of study in English Education consists of four curricular components: freshman seminar and general education, the essential standards, the professional studies core, and content pedagogy.  Upon successful completion of the program and related requirements, graduates are eligible for a Standard Professional I license to teach in the State of North Carolina. The NC Department of Public Instruction issues the teaching license based on University recommendation.

The English Education program is one of 12 teacher education programs offered at UNCP. English Education majors are subject to Teacher Education Program policies, admission requirements, continuation requirements, and graduation requirements. For more information about teacher education policies and requirements, turn to the previous section. 

The English Education program is accredited by the National Council of Teachers of English, the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), and the NC State Board of Education.

PROGRAM STANDARDS: 

The Teacher Education Program standards for all education majors are described fully in the UNCP Teacher Education Program Teacher Candidate Handbook.

PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

The goals of the UNCP English licensure program are that students will increase their knowledge of and competence in the language arts and will be prepared to become effective teachers in the English classroom and to function as contributing English professionals.  The objectives of the program are that students will

1.  understand such areas of the English language as historical and developmental perspectives, grammar systems, and dialects/levels of usage;

2.  read and respond in various ways to works of American, British, and world literature, including literature by women, minorities, and non-western writers;

3.  become acquainted with traditional and contemporary literature appropriate for adolescents and become aware of ways to encourage a variety of reader response to such literature;

4.  experience and study both the writing process and written products for diverse purposes and audiences, completing a variety of writing tasks and studying pedagogical techniques appropriate to working with diverse learners;

5.  be exposed to materials and methods for teaching reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing;

6.  practice instructional planning, presentation, and assessment in the field of English, understanding the necessity of critical reflection in the entire instructional process;

7.  learn how to use diversity of learners, technology, and community resources as strengths in the English classroom; and

8.  gain a sense of professionalism through exposure to positive pedagogical models in their course work, through structured, monitored early field experiences, and through an extended supervised student teaching experience.

 

Secondary Education 9-12 Concentration

Course Requirements

Sem. Hrs.

Freshman Seminar and General Education

45(36)*

Essential Standards (*9 semester hours of Foreign Language and 2000-level Literature may count toward General Education requirements.)

I. Core Requirements

Foreign language competency at the 1320 course level**– 0-6 hours

SPE 2000 Interpersonal Communication or SPE 2010 Fundamentals of Speech

ENG 2050 World Literature before 1660 or ENG 2060 World Literature after 1660

ENG 2230 American Literature before 1865 or ENG 2240 American Literature since 1865

ENG 2470 British Literature before 1790 or ENG 2480 British Literature after 1790

ENG 3040 Principles of Literary Study

ENG 4570 Shakespeare (fall only)

ENGS 4xxx (numbers vary) Seminar in Literature

II. Additional Required Courses: Select six (18 hrs.) from list below with approval of Coordinator/English advisor***:

One 2000-level multicultural course: ENG 2010 Southern Literature, ENG 2020 Contemporary Literature, ENG 2080 Women’s Literature, ENG 2090 Literature and Film, ENG 2100 African American Literature, ENG 2180 Asian American Literature, ENG 2190 Latino Literature, ENG 2200 Native American Literature, or ENG 2410 Environmental Literature

No more than two composition/rhetoric courses: ENG 2990 Writing Center Theory and Practice***, ENG 3570 History of Rhetoric, ENG 3580 Professional Writing, ENG 3590 Creative Nonfiction, ENG 3700 Advanced Composition, ENG 4250 African American Rhetorics, and ENGS 4090-4129 Special Topics in Composition and Rhetoric

ENG 3100 The Harlem Renaissance

ENG 3110 Medieval British Literature 

ENG 3120 Early Modern British Literature

ENG 3130 The American Renaissance

ENG 3140 American Literature in Transition, 1870-1914

ENG 3150 British Romantic Literature

ENG 3160 Victorian Literature

ENG 3170 Post-Colonial Literature

ENG 3250 Language in Society

ENGS 33xx Special Topics in Literature

ENG 3420 The British Novel

ENG 3430 The American Novel

ENG 3440 Native American Novel

ENG 3460 Aspects of the English Language***

ENG 3470 Native American Poetry

ENG 3540 Modern Drama

ENG 3560 Modernist Fiction

ENG 3660 Modernist Poetry

ENG 3670 Contemporary Fiction

ENG 3680 Contemporary Poetry

ENG 3710 English Grammar*** 

One advanced creative writing course: ENG 3740 Writing Poetry II or ENG 3750 Writing Fiction II

ENG 4020 Literary Criticism

ENG 4230, 4240 Special Topics in American English

One ESL course: ENG 4810 Phonetics and Phonology, ENG 4830 Second Language Acquisition, or ENG 4850 Cultural Issues of English as a Second Language

English Education majors will select one 1-hour production course: JRN 1610 Newspaper Production, THE 1620 Play Production, JRN 1820 Yearbook Production, ENG 2860 Literary Magazine Production****

40-46

Professional Studies Core

EPC 2020 Introduction to Education, Ethics, and Professionalism

EPC 2040 Introduction to Exceptional, Diverse, and At-Risk Students

EPC 3010 The Psychology of Learning and Development 

EPC 3030 Reading Strategies for the 21st Century

9

Content Pedagogy

EED 3840 Literature and Reading for Adolescents (6-12): Methods and Materials (spring only)

EED 3890 The Teaching of Writing and Speech (6-12): Methods and Materials (fall only)

CSC 4050 Current Topics in Computers in Education (to be taken after EED 3840)

EED 4490 Internship for English/Language Arts in Secondary/Middle Schools (spring only)

EED 4750 Professional Seminar in Secondary/Middle Grades English/Language Arts (spring only)

21

General Electives

7-13

 

Total:  122

**The foreign language requirement may be met by completing 1310 and 1320, by testing into and completing 1320 only, or by testing out of both 1310 and 1320.

***English Education majors will select ENG 2990, 3460, and 3710 from the list of additional required courses above.

****The Literary Magazine, Newspaper, Play, and Yearbook Production courses are offered under multiple course numbers; see departmental listings for other course numbers that meet this requirement.

 

Middle Grades Language Arts 6-9 Concentration

Course Requirements

Sem. Hrs.

Freshman Seminar and General Education

45 (42)

Essential Standards (*3 semester hours of 2000-level Literature may count toward General Education requirements.)

I. Core Requirements

ENG 2050 World Literature before 1660 or ENG 2060 World Literature after 1660

ENG 2230 American Literature before 1865 or ENG 2240 American Literature since 1865

ENG 2470 British Literature before 1790 or ENG 2480 British Literature after 1790

ENG 3040 Principles of Literary Study

ENG 3460 Aspects of the English Language

ENG 3710 English Grammar

One 2000-level multicultural course: ENG 2010 Southern Literature, ENG 2020 Contemporary Literature, ENG 2080 Women’s Literature, ENG 2090 Literature and Film, ENG 2100 African American Literature, ENG 2180 Asian American Literature, ENG 2190 Latino Literature, ENG 2200 Native American Literature, or ENG 2410 Environmental Literature

II. Additional Required Courses: Select three of the following literature courses: ENG 3100, 3110, 3120, 3130, 3140, 3150, 3160, 3170, 3250, 3420, 3430, 3440, 3470, 3540, 3560, 3660, 3670, 3680, or ENGS 33xx; or 2 literature courses from the previous list plus SPE 2000 or SPE 2010 or SPE 3580 or THE 2010

30

Second Academic Concentration

18-30

Professional Studies Core

EPC 2020 Introduction to Education, Ethics, and Professionalism

EPC 2040 Introduction to Exceptional, Diverse, and At-Risk Students

EPC 3010 The Psychology of Learning and Development 

EPC 3030 Reading Strategies for the 21st Century

EDN 3400 Philosophy and Curriculum of Middle Grades

12

Content Pedagogy

EED 3840 Literature and Reading for Adolescents (6-12): Methods and Materials (spring only)

EED 3890 The Teaching of Writing and Speech (6-12): Methods and Materials (fall only)

CSC 4050 Current Topics in Computers in Education (to be taken after EED 3840)

EED 4490 Internship for English/Language Arts in Secondary/Middle Schools (spring only)

EED 4750 Professional Seminar in Secondary/Middle Grades English/Language Arts (spring only)

21

 

Total: 123*

*may be greater depending on Second Academic Concentration

 

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE ADD-ON LICENSURE

Coordinator:  Kay McClanahan               Location:  Department of English, Theatre, and Foreign Languages

Students can take the 6 courses (18 hours) in the program for either undergraduate or graduate credit and, upon completion of the program, can add on to either the Standard Professional I or “M” license. All courses will be offered in the late afternoon or evening, and the program can be completed within two years.

Course Requirements

Sem. Hrs.

ENG 3460 Aspects of the English Language

ENG 3710 English Grammar

ENG 4810/5810  Phonetics and Phonology

ENG 4830/5830  Second Language Acquisition

ENG 4850/5850  Cultural Issues of English as a Second Language

TESL 4890/5890  Applied Pedagogy of Teaching English as a Second Language

3

3

3

3

3

3

 

 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MATHEMATICS EDUCATION (9-12, 6-9)

Coordinator: Mary Klinikowski               Location:  Department of Mathematics and Computer Science

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

The program of study in Mathematics Education consists of four curricular components: freshman seminar and general education, the essential standards, the professional studies core, and content pedagogy.  Upon successful completion of the program and related requirements, graduates are eligible for a Standard Professional I license to teach in the State of North Carolina.  The NC Department of Public Instruction issues the teaching license based on University recommendation.

The Mathematics Education program is one of 12 teacher education programs offered at UNCP. Mathematics Education majors are subject to Teacher Education Program policies, admission requirements, continuation requirements, and graduation requirements. For more information about teacher education policies and requirements, turn to the previous section.

The Mathematics Education program is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the NC State Board of Education.

PROGRAM STANDARDS 

The Teacher Education Program standards for all education majors are described fully in the UNCP Teacher Education Program Teacher Candidate Handbook.

PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

The Mathematics Education program recognizes that teaching mathematics is a complex endeavor. Pre-service teachers of mathematics need to be involved in developing their knowledge, skills, understandings, and dispositions to teach mathematics to diverse learners. The goal of the Mathematics Education program is to prepare effective and professional mathematics teachers who are ready to make positive contributions to the mathematical development of middle and high school students in diverse settings. To accomplish this goal, the Mathematics Education program will

1.  provide students with a solid foundation and understanding of mathematics.

2.  enable students to appreciate both the aesthetic and practical aspects of mathematics.

3.  provide experiences that will help students see that they will need to have a variety of teaching and learning strategies available at all times.

4.  provide students with current theories regarding the psychological development of the learner and an understanding of human dynamics found in the home, the school, and the community.

5.  demonstrate methods of evaluating student learning, textbooks, the curriculum, educational techniques, and the educational process as a whole.

6.  prepare students to deal with a diverse population that has a broad spectrum of needs, aspirations, and expectations for themselves and others.

7.  provide a consideration of societal needs that are satisfied by applications of and careers based on mathematics and technology.

8.  stress the importance to a teaching professional of keeping abreast of current trends in mathematics education through the reading of professional journals and participation in mathematics workshops, institutes, conferences, professional meeting and in-service programs.

The specific objectives supporting each goal are described fully in the Teacher Education Student Handbook.

 

Secondary Concentration (9-12)

Course Requirements

Sem. Hrs.

Freshman Seminar and General Education*

45

Essential Standards

MAT 2210 Calculus I*

MAT 2220 Calculus II

MAT 2300 Introduction to Advanced Mathematics

MAT 2600 Connections in Mathematics I

MAT 3110 Advanced Euclidean Geometry

MAT 3150 Linear Algebra I

MAT 3250 Algebra I

MAT 3280 Probability and Statistics I

MAT 3310 Calculus III

MAT 3330 Discrete Mathematics

MAT 3600 Connections in Mathematics II

MAT 4110 College Geometry

MAT 4310 Real Analysis I

MAT 4020 A Historical Development of Mathematics

MAT 4600 Connections in Mathematics III

CSC 2020 Microcomputer Programming

45

Professional Studies Core

EPC 2020 Introduction to Education, Ethics, and Professionalism

EPC 2040 Introduction to Exceptional, Diverse, and At-Risk Students

EPC 3010 The Psychology of Learning and Development    

EPC 3030 Reading Strategies for the 21st Century

9

Content Pedagogy

MAT 2500 Introduction to Teaching Mathematics in Middle Grades and Secondary Schools

MAT 3500 Teaching Mathematics with Technology

MAT 3750 Methods for Teaching Algebra

MAT 4000 Methods of Teaching Mathematics in Middle Grades and Secondary Schools

MAT 4490 Internship in Mathematics in the Secondary School

MAT 4750 Professional Seminar in Secondary Mathematics

CSC 4050 Current Topics in Computers in Education

25

General Electives

3

 

Total:  127

*Prospective Mathematics Education majors should start with MAT 1090 as their General Ed. course in mathematics.  MAT 1070 & 1080 or MAT 2210 may be used in place of MAT 1090.  If MAT 2210 is used for General Ed., an additional advanced mathematics course (3000 or above) is required. 

 

Middle Grades Concentration (6-9)

Course Requirements

Sem. Hrs.

Freshman Seminar and General Education

45

Essential Standards

MAT 1070 College Algebra*

MAT 1080 Plane Trigonometry*

MAT 2100 Introduction to Statistics*

MAT 2110 Survey of Geometry

MAT 2150 Calculus with Applications*

MAT 2300 Introduction to Advanced Mathematics

MAT 2600 Connections in Mathematics I

MAT 3150 Linear Algebra I

MAT 3330 Discrete Mathematics

MAT 3600 Connections in Mathematics II

MAT 4020 A Historical Development of Mathematics

30

Second Academic Concentration (Several courses will also count towards General Education requirements.)

18-30

Professional Studies Core

EPC 2020 Introduction to Education, Ethics, and Professionalism

EPC 2040 Introduction to Exceptional, Diverse, and At-Risk Students

EPC 3010 The Psychology of Learning and Development 

EPC 3030 Reading Strategies for the 21st Century

EDN 3400 Philosophy and Curriculum of Middle Grades

12

Content Pedagogy

MAT 2500 Introduction to Teaching Mathematics in Middle Grades and Secondary Schools

MAT 3500 Teaching Mathematics with Technology

MAT 3750 Methods for Teaching Algebra

MAT 4000 Methods of Teaching Mathematics in Middle Grades and Secondary Schools

MAT 4490 Internship in Mathematics in the Secondary School

MAT 4750 Professional Seminar in Secondary Mathematics

CSC 4050 Current Topics in Computers in Education

25

General Electives (Depending on second concentration requirements.)

0-4

 

Total: 128

* Six hours of these essential standards courses will count towards General Education requirements.

 

 

BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN MUSIC EDUCATION (K-12)

Coordinator: José Rivera              Location:  Department of Music

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

The program of study in Music Education consists of four curricular components: freshman seminar and general education, the essential standards, the professional studies core, and content pedagogy. Upon successful completion of the program and related requirements, graduates are eligible for a Standard Professional I license to teach in the State of North Carolina.  The NC Department of Public Instruction issues the teaching license based on University recommendation.

The Music Education program is one of 12 teacher education programs offered at UNCP. Music Education majors are subject to Teacher Education Program policies, admission requirements, continuation requirements, and graduation requirements. For more information about teacher education policies and requirements, turn to the previous section.

The Music Education program is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the NC State Board of Education.

PROGRAM STANDARDS 

The Teacher Education Program standards for all education majors are described fully in the UNCP Teacher Education Program Teacher Candidate Handbook.

PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

The goal of the Music Education program is to provide comprehensive training for teachers of vocal and instrumental music.  These students will have a solid foundation in the liberal arts and musical experiences which will develop their cultural sensitivity while providing programs and concerts to enrich the cultural life of the university and the community.  Specifically, students majoring in Music Education will

1.  a) demonstrate a mastery of performance skills in at least one major medium, b) have an adequate level of keyboard proficiency, c) participate in both large and small ensembles, and d) acquire suitable conducting and rehearsal skills;

2.  demonstrate both aural and analytical skill encompassing an understanding of the basic elements of music, its forms, processes, and structures as well as the ability to place music into its proper historical, cultural, and stylistic context;

3.  demonstrate the ability to create (compose and improvise) derivative or original music;

4.  demonstrate knowledge of music history and literature of both Western and non-Western origin;

5.  demonstrate a knowledge of current music technology;

6.  demonstrate a thorough knowledge of the North Carolina Standard Course of Study (K-12);

7.  demonstrate the ability to a) use comprehensive assessment, b) create and foster dynamic learning environments, c) use diversity as a strength in the classroom, d) model attitudes and behaviors that reflect professional and ethical standards, e) interact effectively with others in the school, the community, and beyond, and f) advocate for quality music programs; and

8.  demonstrate a) the ability to work independently, b) the ability to formulate and defend value judgments about music, and c) an understanding of the interrelationships and interdependencies among the various professions and activities that constitute the music enterprise.

 

Course Requirements

Sem. Hrs.

Freshman Seminar and General Education

45(39)*

Essential Standards—Select one Emphasis (*6 semester hours may count toward General Ed)

Vocal Emphasis:

7 hours of a Major Ensemble (at least 4 hours of MUS 1001 University Chorale and up to 3 hours of MUS 1381 Pembroke Singers)

MUS 1810 Class Piano I or MUSP 1021 Private Piano

MUS 1820 Class Piano II or MUSP 1021 Private Piano

MUS 2810 Class Piano III or MUSP 1021 Private Piano

MUS 1140, 1150, 2140, 2150 Theory I, II, III, IV and MUSL 1140, 1150, 2140, 2150 Lab I, II, III, IV

MUS 2250, 2260, 2270, 2280 Class Woodwind, Brass, Percussion, and Strings

MUS 2290 Vocal Methods

MUS 2450 Music Technology

MUS 2540 Introduction to Music Education

MUS 29302 World of Music: Classical to the Contemporary Era

MUS 29401 World of Music: Antiquity to the Baroque Era

MUS 3970 World of Music: A Global Study

MUS 3290 Conducting

MUS 3301 Rehearsal Strategies

MUS 3340 Orchestration and Arranging

MUS 4040 Senior Recital

Instrumental Emphasis:

MUS 1001 University Chorale

7 hours of MUS 1411 or 1161 Concert Band or Orchestra

MUS 1810 Class Piano I or MUSP 1021 Private Piano

MUS 1820 Class Piano II or MUSP 1021 Private Piano

MUS 1140, 1150, 2140, 2150 Theory I, II, III, IV and MUSL 1140, 1150, 2140, 2150 Lab I, II, III, IV

MUS 2250, 2260, 2270, 2280 Class Woodwind, Brass, Percussion, and Strings

MUS 2290 Vocal Methods

MUS 2450 Music Technology

MUS 2540 Introduction to Music Education

MUS 29302 World of Music: Classical to the Contemporary Era

MUS 29401 World of Music: Antiquity to the Baroque Era

MUS 3970 World of Music: A Global Study

MUS 3290 Conducting

MUS 3301 Rehearsal Strategies

MUS 3340 Orchestration and Arranging

MUS 4040 Senior Recital

Keyboard Emphasis (Vocal Orientation):

4 hours of a Major Ensemble (at least 2 hours of MUS 1001 University Chorale and up to 2 hours of MUS 1381 Pembroke Singers)

MUS 1140, 1150, 2140, 2150 Theory I, II, III, IV and MUSL 1140, 1150, 2140, 2150 Lab I, II, III, IV

MUS 2250, 2260, 2270, 2280 Class Woodwind, Brass, Percussion, and Strings

MUS 2290 Vocal Methods

MUS 2450 Music Technology

MUS 2540 Introduction to Music Education

MUS 29302 World of Music: Classical to the Contemporary Era

MUS 29401 World of Music: Antiquity to the Baroque Era

MUS 3970 World of Music: A Global Study

MUS 3290 Conducting

MUS 3301 Rehearsal Strategies

MUS 3340 Orchestration and Arranging

3 hours of MUS 3351 Accompanying

MUS 4040 Senior Recital

MUS 4250 Piano Pedagogy

Keyboard Emphasis (Instrumental Orientation):

1 hour of MUS 1001 University Chorale

4 hours of MUS 1411 or 1161 Concert Band or Orchestra

MUS 1140, 1150, 2140, 2150 Theory I, II, III, IV and MUSL 1140, 1150, 2140, 2150 Lab I, II, III, IV

MUS 2250, 2260, 2270, 2280 Class Woodwind, Brass, Percussion, and Strings

MUS 2290 Vocal Methods

MUS 2450 Music Technology

MUS 2540 Introduction to Music Education

MUS 29302 World of Music: Classical to the Contemporary Era

MUS 29401 World of Music: Antiquity to the Baroque Era

MUS 3970 World of Music: A Global Study

MUS 3290 Conducting

MUS 3301 Rehearsal Strategies

MUS 3340 Orchestration and Arranging

3 hours of MUS 3351 Accompanying

MUS 4040 Senior Recital

MUS 4250 Piano Pedagogy

All students: Applied Music (MUSP) 14 hours

63

Professional Studies Core

EDN 2100 Introduction to Education

EDN 3150 Developmental Perspectives of Educational Psychology   

SED 3310 Introduction to the Exceptional Child

9

Content Pedagogy

MUS 4000 Elementary Music Methods and Materials

MUS 4050 Secondary General and Choral Music Education Methods (Vocal Emphasis and Keyboard Emphasis [Vocal Orientation])

MUS 4200 Secondary Instrumental Music Methods (Instrumental Emphasis and Keyboard Emphasis [Instrumental Orientation])

MUS 4750 Professional Seminar for Pre-Service Teachers

MUS 4490 Internship

17

 

Total:  128

1MUS 2940 fulfills the Fine Arts requirement in General Education.

2MUS 2930 fulfills the Humanities (Fine Arts) Elective requirement in General Education.

 

 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HEALTH/PHYSICAL EDUCATION (K-12)

Coordinator: Denny Scruton                   Location: Department of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

The program of study in Health/Physical Education consists of four curricular components: freshman seminar and general education, the essential standards, the professional studies core, and content pedagogy.  Upon successful completion of the program and related requirements, graduates are eligible for a Standard Professional I license to teach in the State of North Carolina.  The NC Department of Public Instruction issues the teaching license based on University recommendation.

The Health/Physical Education program is one of 12 teacher education programs offered at UNCP. Health/Physical Education majors are subject to Teacher Education Program policies, admission requirements, continuation requirements, and graduation requirements. For more information about teacher education policies and requirements, turn to the previous section.

The Health/Physical Education program is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the NC State Board of Education.

PROGRAM STANDARDS 

The Teacher Education Program standards for all education majors are described fully in the UNCP Teacher Education Program Teacher Candidate Handbook.

PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 

The goal of the Health/Physical Education program is to enable the prospective physical educator to acquire  knowledge of the processes underlying wellness, fitness, health, exercise, and recreation in relationship to educating the physical, mental, and social human.  More specifically, the student will

1.  learn teaching strategies, curriculum planning, evaluation approaches, and research methods;

2.  learn how to meet the individual learning needs of diverse learners, typical or atypical;

3.  learn how to adapt the physical education program to the academic, social, and physical developmental needs of diverse K-12 learners;

4.  learn the professional literature and how to research that literature;

5.  develop affiliations with various professional communities at the local, state, and/or national levels;

6.  learn how to select and evaluate curricular materials, select appropriate instructional methods, and use equipment appropriate for different levels and types of physical education instruction.

 

Course Requirements

Sem. Hrs.

Freshman Seminar and General Education*

45(43)*

Essential Standards

PED 1010 Wellness and Fitness (meets Gen Ed. Req.)*

PED 1380 Rhythms and Dance (meets Gen Ed. Req.)*

PED 2000 Motor Learning and Development

PED 2040 Adaptive Physical Education

PED 2060 Nutrition

PED 2070 Technology Applications in HPER

PED 3120 PE and Sport in Contemporary Society

PED 3480 Kinesiology

PED 3490 Anatomy and Physiology

PED 4120 Exercise Physiology

PED 4150 Organization and Administration of Physical Education and Athletics

PED 4240 Tests and Measurement in Physical Education

2 1-hour coaching courses

HLTH 1060 Safety and First Aid

HLTH 3300 Health Promotion and Fitness Skills

HLTH 3650 Epidemiology of Human Diseases

HLTH 3770 Drugs, Society, and Behavior

HLTH 4100 Health and Fitness Behavior Changes

HLTH 4700 Planning, Administration, and Evaluation of Programs

40

Professional Studies Core

EDN 2100 Introduction to Education

EDN 3130 Content Area Reading

EDN 3150 Developmental Perspectives of Educational Psychology   

SED 3310 Introduction to the Exceptional Child

12

Content Pedagogy

PED 3000 Health/Physical Education Activities for Grades K-3

PED 3170 Health/Physical Education Activities for Grades 4-6

PED 3175 Health/Physical Education Activities for Grades 7-9

PED 3020 Health/Physical Education Activities for Grades 10-12

PED 4040 Classroom Discipline

PED 4060 Professional Seminar in Health/Physical Education, K-12

EDN 4490 Internship

20

General Electives

3

 

Total:  120

 

 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN SCIENCE EDUCATION (9-12, 6-9)

Coordinator: Mary Ash                 Location:  Department of Biology

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

The program of study in Science Education consists of four curricular components: freshman seminar and general education, the essential standards, the professional studies core, and content pedagogy.  Upon successful completion of the program and related requirements, graduates are eligible for a Standard Professional I license to teach in the State of North Carolina.  The NC Department of Public Instruction issues the teaching license based on University recommendation.

The Science Education program is one of 12 teacher education programs offered at UNCP. Science Education majors are subject to Teacher Education Program policies, admission requirements, continuation requirements, and graduation requirements. For more information about teacher education policies and requirements, turn to the previous section.

The Science Education program is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the NC State Board of Education.

PROGRAM STANDARDS 

The Teacher Education Program standards for all education majors are described fully in the UNCP Teacher Education Program Teacher Candidate Handbook.

PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

The goal of the Science Education program is to prepare competent science teachers committed to the development of scientific literacy in diverse secondary school learners.  The program helps the prospective science educator integrate the knowledge bases underlying the curricular areas of science into an internal framework of their own through collaboration with peers, university faculty, and public school partners.  The prospective science teacher should possess the following characteristics:

1.  an understanding of unifying concepts of science and how this knowledge will enable students to deal with personal and social problems intelligently;

2.  an understanding of the nature of science and the historical development of scientific thought;

3.  an understanding of the interrelationships between science, mathematics, technology, and society;

4.  an understanding of how science contributes to the personal development of diverse individuals;

5.  an understanding of developmentally appropriate instructional methods and curriculum of science, to include inquiry-based instruction, assessment techniques, and the integration of technology;

6.  the communication skills necessary for effective teaching, as well as, the skills necessary for effective classroom management;

7.  an understanding of the role of research in science education;

8. an awareness of the importance of incorporating best practices into science classrooms through lifelong professional development;

9.  an awareness of the safety precautions specific to classroom, stockroom, laboratories, and other areas used for science instruction.

10. the ability to collaborate with colleagues, families, and community members to improve science instruction for all students.

 

Course Requirements

Sem. Hrs.

Freshman Seminar and General Education

45(33)*

Essential Standards—Select one area of concentration (*12 semester hours of Natural Sciences and Mathematics may count toward General Ed)

 

Biology (9-12) Concentration:

BIO 1000 & 1000L Principles of Biology and Lab

BIO 1010 General Botany

BIO 1020 General Zoology

BIO 3040 Principles of Ecology

BIO 3180 Principles of Genetics

BIO 3710 Cell Biology

BIO 4220 Evolution

Select one (minimum of 3 hours): BIO 3510 Research Strategies; BIO 4310 Biometrics; BIO 4990 Research in Biology; or BIOS 3xxx Special Topics in Biology

MAT 1070 College Algebra or MAT 1090 Precalculus

MAT 2150 Calculus with Applications

CHM 1300 & 1100 General Chemistry I and lab

CHM 1310 & 1110 General Chemistry II and lab

CHM 2500 Organic Chemistry I

GLY 1150 & 1150L Earth Science and Lab

GLY 1250 & 1250L Earth History and Lab

PHY 1500 & 1560 College Physics I and lab

PHY 1510 & 1570 College Physics II and lab

65

Chemistry (9-12) Concentration:

CHM 1300 & 1100 General Chemistry I and lab

CHM 1310 & 1110 General Chemistry II and lab

CHM 2260 Elementary Inorganic Chemistry

CHM 2270 Analytical Chemistry

CHM 2500 Organic Chemistry I

CHM 2510 Organic Chemistry II

CHM 3110 Biochemistry

CHM 3120 Experimental Methods in Biochemistry

Select one (minimum of 3 hours): CHM 3990 Research in Chemistry or CHMS 4xxx Special Topics in Chemistry

MAT 2210 Calculus I

MAT 2220 Calculus II

BIO 1000 & 1000L Principles of Biology and Lab

BIO 1010 General Botany or BIO 1020 General Zoology

GLY 1150 & 1150L Earth Science and Lab

GLY 1250 & 1250L Earth History and Lab

PHY 1500 & 1560 College Physics I and lab

PHY 1510 & 1570 College Physics II and lab

Guided Electives – 2 hours

65

Earth Science (9-12) Concentration:

GLY 1000 & 1000L Physical Geology and Lab or GLY 1150 & 1150L Earth Science and Lab

GLY 1250 & 1250L Earth History and Lab

GLY 2260 Oceanography

GLY 2460 Weather and Climate

GLY 2620 Environmental Geology

GLY 3100 Minerals and Rocks and GLY 3110 Lab

GLY 3250 Paleontology

PHS 1560 Astronomy

Select two: GLY 3660 Geomorphology; GLY 4250 Stratigraphy and Sedimentology; GLYS 4xxx Special Topics in Geology

MAT 1090 College Algebra and Trigonometry

CHM 1300 & 1100 General Chemistry I and lab

CHM 1310 & 1110 General Chemistry II and lab

CHM 2500 Organic Chemistry I

BIO 1000 & 1000L Principles of Biology and Lab

BIO 1010 General Botany or BIO 1020 General Zoology

PHY 1500 & 1560 College Physics I and lab

PHY 1510 & 1570 College Physics II and lab

65

Physics (9-12) Concentration:

PHY 2000 & 2060 University Physics I and Lab

PHY 2010 & 2070 University Physics II and Lab

PHY 2180 Optics

PHY 2560 Modern Physics

PHY 3000 Classical Mechanics

PHY 3200 Electricity

PHY 3260 Heat and Temperature

PHY 4000 Quantum Mechanics

PHY 4200 Advanced Laboratory I

Guided Electives – 1 hour

MAT 2210 Calculus I

MAT 2220 Calculus II

MAT 3320 Differential Equations

BIO 1000 & 1000L Principles of Biology and Lab

GLY 1150 & 1150L Earth Science and Lab

BIO 1010 General Botany or BIO 1020 General Zoology

CHM 1300 & 1100 General Chemistry I and lab

CHM 1310 & 1110 General Chemistry II and lab

PHS 1560 Astronomy

PHS 1570 Astronomy Lab

65

Middle Grades Science (6-9) Concentration:

BIO 1000 & 1000L Principles of Biology and Lab

BIO 1030 Basic Human Biology

BIO 3040 Principles of Ecology

GLY 1150 & 1150L Earth Science and Lab

GLY 1250 & 1250L Earth History and Lab

CHM 1300 & 1100 General Chemistry I and lab

PHY 1500 & 1560 College Physics I and lab

PHS 1560 Astronomy

PHS 1570 Astronomy Lab

MAT 1070 College Algebra

MAT 2100 Introduction to Statistics

Completion of a second Academic or Professional Concentration

Select one from the following:  American Indian Studies, American Studies, Art, Biology, English, Exercise and Sport Science, Geography, Geology, History, Mathematics, Music, Physics, Psychology, Reading, Sociology, Spanish, or Special Education

Guided Electives – 1-7 hours**

62

Professional Studies Core

EPC 2020 Introduction to Education, Ethics, and Professionalism

EPC 2040 Introduction to Exceptional, Diverse, and At-Risk Students

EPC 3010 The Psychology of Learning and Development 

EPC 3030 Reading Strategies for the 21st Century

9

Content Pedagogy

SCE 3000 Early Experiences for Prospective Science Teachers

SCE 3010 Early Laboratory Experiences for Prospective Science Teachers

SCE 3500 The Teaching of Science in the Middle Grades (required for the 6-9 concentration) or SCE 4000 Teaching Science in the Secondary School (required for the 9-12 concentrations)

SCE 4490 Internship in Science in Middle/Secondary Schools

SCE 4750 Professional Seminar in Middle/Secondary Science

CSC 4050 Current Topics in Computers in Education

EDN 3400 Philosophy and Curriculum of Middle Grades Education (required only for the 6-9 concentration)

21-24

 

Total: 128

**The number of elective hours required in the Middle Grades Science Concentration will be determined based on the student’s second academic concentration. 128 hours are required for the degree.

 

                                                                                                                                                       

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN HISTORY:  SOCIAL STUDIES EDUCATION (9-12, 6-9)

Coordinator: Jeffrey K. Lucas                  Location: Department of History

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

The program of study in Social Studies Education consists of four curricular components: freshman seminar and general education, the essential standards, the professional studies core, and content pedagogy.   Upon successful completion of the program and related requirements, graduates are eligible for a Standard Professional I license to teach secondary or middle grades social studies in the State of North Carolina.  The NC Department of Public Instruction issues the teaching license based on University recommendation.

The Social Studies Education program is one of 12 teacher education programs offered at UNCP. Social Studies Education majors are subject to Teacher Education Program policies, admission requirements, continuation requirements, and graduation requirements. For more information about teacher education policies and requirements, turn to the previous section.

The Social Studies Education program is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the NC State Board of Education.

PROGRAM STANDARDS 

The Teacher Education Program standards for all education majors are described fully in the UNCP Teacher Education Program Teacher Candidate Handbook.

PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

The goal of the Social Studies Education program is to educate effective, professional social studies teachers who have a solid foundation in the liberal arts; an academic major in history and a strong concentration in the social sciences; and the skills and attitudes essential for preparing middle grades and secondary school students for responsible citizenship in a multicultural, democratic society and an interdependent world.  Teaching social studies, which includes “the entirety of human experience,” requires that students

1.  know the major periods of United States, North Carolina, World, European, African, Asian, and Latin American history and identify the basic political, social, economic, cultural, and geographical themes of each period;

2.  recognize the influence of each civilization upon the world and acknowledge the European heritage of significant United States institutions;

3.  situate significant current events within an historical framework and recognize their interrelatedness;

4.  understand the nature, content, and concepts of the social science disciplines (Anthropology, Economics, Geography, Political Science, and Sociology) and apply social science concepts to the study of  individuals,  societies, and institutions;

5.  develop constructive attitudes toward diversity, pluralism, change, conflict, and uncertainty;

6.  understand the historical and contemporary place of Social Studies in public education, with particular attention to the current North Carolina Social Studies curriculum, and become familiar with recent trends and their significance for social studies educators;

7.  formulate appropriate objectives and utilize a variety of effective instructional strategies, resources, and assessment techniques which are designed to develop the skills of inquiry, decision-making, problem solving, and critical thinking;

8.  develop classroom management skills consistent with current professional standards, respect for all individuals, fairness, and a positive classroom climate;

9.  exhibit a working knowledge of instructional technology and the ability to integrate appropriate Computer Based Instructional resources and strategies into social studies instruction;

10.complete a sequenced program of field experiences and professional activities that develop a respect for the profession, a sense of individual competence, and an appreciation for continual reflective practice, collaboration, and professional development.

 

Course Requirements for secondary and middle grades teacher candidates

Sem. Hrs.

Freshman Seminar and General Education*

46(28)*

Essential Standards (*18 semester hours of Social Sciences and History may also count toward General Ed)

Basic History

HST 1010 American Civilizations to 1877

HST 1020 American Civilizations since 1877

HST 1140 World Civilizations to 1500

HST 1150 World Civilizations since 1500

Seminar in History

HST 3000 Introduction to the Study of History

Advanced History (all must be at the 3000 or 4000 level)

HSTS 4xxx Topics in History or HST 4510 Senior Seminar

United States & Canadian History - 6 hours

HST 3170 North Carolina History

Asian, African & Latin American History – 6 hours

European History – 6 hours

Social Sciences

ECN 1000 Economics of Social Issues

SOC 1050 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

SOC 2090 Social Problems or PSY 1010 Introductory Psychology

GGY 1010 Principles of Geography, or GGY 1020 World Regional Geography, or GGY 2000 Cultural Geography

PLS 1010 Introduction to American National Government 

Social Science Guided Electives – 6 hours

60

Professional Studies Core

EDN 2100 Introduction to Education

EDN 3130 Content Area Reading

EDN 3140 Aspects of Human Development and Educational Psychology     

SED 3310 Introduction to the Exceptional Child

12

Content Pedagogy

SSE 3000 Introduction to Teaching Social Studies

SSE 3650 Content and Techniques of Social Studies

SSE 4000 Methods of Teaching Social Studies

SSE 4480 Internship in Social Studies in the Secondary School

SSE 4490 Professional Seminar in Middle/Secondary Social Studies

CSC 4050 Current Topics in Computers in Education

24

General Electives

4

 

Total:  128

 

 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN SPANISH WITH TEACHER LICENSURE (K-12)

Coordinator: Ana Cecilia Lara            Location: Department of English, Theatre, and Foreign Languages

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

The B.A. in Spanish with Teacher Licensure program consists of four curricular components: freshman seminar and general education, the essential standards, the professional studies core, and content pedagogy.  Upon successful completion of the program and related requirements, graduates are eligible for a Standard Professional I license to teach in the State of North Carolina.  The NC Department of Public Instruction issues the teaching license based on University recommendation.

The Spanish licensure program is one of 12 teacher education programs offered at UNCP. Spanish licensure candidates are subject to Teacher Education Committee Program policies, admission requirements, continuation requirements, and graduation requirements. For more information about teacher education policies and requirements, turn to the previous section.

The Spanish licensure program is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the NC State Board of Education.

PROGRAM STANDARDS 

The Teacher Education Program standards for all education majors are described fully in the UNCP Teacher Education Program Teacher Candidate Handbook.

PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

1.  Students who complete a major in Spanish will acquire

·         A broad, balanced, and practical knowledge and understanding of Spanish language through the four skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening and through advanced grammar, composition, and conversation;

·         A comprehensive knowledge of Peninsular and Spanish-American literature, culture, and civilization.

2.  Students who complete a major in Spanish will acquire the ability and skills to

·         Demonstrate near fluency or fluency in reading, writing, speaking, and comprehending Spanish;

·         Converse in everyday situations and also use professional language;

·         Write effectively in a clear, standard Spanish about a variety of topics;

·         Listen to, understand, and identify varieties of Spanish spoken in the Hispanic world;

·         Read and comprehend a variety of texts.

3.  Students who complete a major in Spanish will develop appropriate dispositions to

·         Participate in entry-level positions requiring knowledge of the Spanish language;

·         Enroll in and complete graduate school successfully;

·         Work with the Hispanic community throughout their productive lives;

·         Have an enhanced appreciation for all aspects of Spanish, including historical and contemporary issues;

·         Have an enhanced appreciation for people of Hispanic backgrounds;

·         Recognize the importance of formal language study for use and more effective competition in the global marketplace, whether in schools, in medical and social services, or in corporate business.

 

Course Requirements

Sem. Hrs.

Freshman Seminar and General Education*

45(39)*

Essential Standards (*0-6 semester hours of Spanish may also count toward General Ed)

SPN 2310 and 2320 Intermediate Spanish I, II or SPN 2330 Spanish for Heritage Speakers

Pronunciation Proficiency—May be met with a P grade in SPN 2990 or through Pronunciation Proficiency Validation by Department Chair

SPN 3110 Spanish Composition and Review of Grammar

SPN 3120 Spanish Conversation

SPN 3150 Analytical Skills and Critical Aspects of Spanish

SPN 3200 Literary Analysis and Criticism in Spanish

SPN 3700 Advanced Grammar and Composition

Six courses from those listed below (at least one 4000-level literature course is required):

SPN 3210 Survey of Spanish-American Literature I

SPN 3220 Survey of Spanish-American Literature II

SPN 3310 Survey of Literature of Spain I

SPN 3320 Survey of Literature of Spain II

SPN 3360 History of the Spanish Language

SPN 3510 Study Abroad

SPN 3610 Civilization and Culture of Spanish America

SPN 3620 Civilization and Culture of Spain

SPN 3710 Business Spanish

SPN 4130 Topics in Colonial Spanish-American Literature

SPN 4140 19th Century Spanish-American Literature

SPN 4150 Contemporary Spanish-American Literature

SPN 4230 Topics in Medieval, Renaissance, and Golden Age Literature

SPN 4240 19th Century Literature of Spain

SPN 4250 Contemporary Literature of Spain

SPN 4550 Directed Study in Spanish

SPN 4700 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics

SPNS 4xxx Special Topics in Hispanic Studies

39-40

Professional Studies Core

EDN 2100 Introduction to Education

EDN 3130 Content Area Reading

EDN 3150 Developmental Perspectives of Educational Psychology   

SED 3310 Introduction to the Exceptional Child

12

Content Pedagogy

SPN 3010 Early Laboratory Experiences for Prospective Spanish Teachers

SPN 4400 Methods of Teaching Spanish

SPN 4480 Professional Seminar for Pre-Service Teachers

SPN 4490 Internship for Spanish Education

CSC 4050 Current Topics in Computers in Education

19

General Electives

4-5

 

Total:  121

 

 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN SPECIAL EDUCATION (K-12)

Coordinator: Marisa Scott                  Location: Department of Educational Specialties

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

The programs of study in Special Education consist of five curricular components: freshman seminar and general education, the professional studies core, the essential standards area, content pedagogy, and content area focus. Upon successful completion of the program and related requirements, graduates are eligible for a Standard Professional I license to teach in the State of North Carolina.  The NC Department of Public Instruction issues the teaching license based on University recommendation.

The Special Education program in General Curriculum is one of 12 teacher education programs offered at UNCP. Special Education majors are subject to Teacher Education Program policies, admission requirements, continuation requirements, and graduation requirements. For more information about teacher education policies and requirements, turn to the previous section.

The Special Education programs are accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the NC State Board of Education.

PROGRAM STANDARDS 

The Teacher Education Program standards for all education majors are described fully in the UNCP Teacher Education Program Teacher Candidate Handbook.

PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

The goal of the Special Education Program is to prepare effective and qualified professionals that provide research-validated instruction and behavior supports to maintain at grade level students with disabilities who are enrolled in the North Carolina Standard Course of Study.  The following are the objectives for the undergraduate Special Education Program.

The effective and qualified pre-service special educator

1.    acquires basic skills, knowledge, and attitudes in a wide variety of disciplines including the arts and the humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and the social sciences.

2.    develops the ability to analyze.

3.    experiences a interdisciplinary curriculum which emphasized the interrelationship of the culture, research and practices deemed appropriate and necessary in educational and social settings.

4.    completes an Academic or Professional Concentration (Reading is suggested) of sufficient depth and breadth to complement and strengthen their overall program of studies and area of specialization.

5.    acquires knowledge and understanding of human growth and development; foundations of education; the purpose, organization, and administration of the schools; the teaching-learning process; positive behavior supports; collaboration with general education teachers; curriculum; and methodology.

6.    demonstrates necessary competencies through systematic field experiences at both the elementary and secondary level, and a culminating and comprehensive student teaching internship.

7.    develops a broad background in the various categories of exceptional, diverse, and at-risk students, and demonstrates special skills in teaching students with mild disabilities across various content areas and ages; and in various settings.

8.    demonstrates appropriate communication skills and a professional attitude for collaboration with parents, school personnel, and other related professionals.

9.    demonstrates a diagnostic-prescriptive orientation toward instruction and behavior intervention, and is able to offer intensive and explicit individual and small group instruction.

10.  provides leadership in implementing special education procedures and policies.

11.  experiences, through personal investigation and growth, increased self-actualization, and in turn, foster self-worth and confidence through positive interaction with learners who have mild disabilities.

Course Requirements

Sem. Hrs.

Freshman Seminar and General Education

45

Professional Studies Core

EDN 2100 Introduction to Education

EDN 3130 Content Area Reading

EDN 3150 Developmental Perspectives of Educational Psychology

RDG 2000 Foundations of Reading and Language Acquisition

SED 3310 Introduction to the Exceptional Child

15

Essential Standards

EDN 2900 Research and Writing in Education

SED 3040 Working with Families of Diverse Students with Disabilities

SED 3110 Assistive Technology

SED 3320 Special Education Law, Policies, and Procedures

SED 3330 Teaching Students Who Need Adaptive or Functional Curricula

SED 3350 Assessment of Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities

SED 4030 Collaboration in School and Community for School Professionals

SED 4250 Transition Planning for Students with Disabilities

24

Content Pedagogy

SED 3340 Instructional Strategies for Students With Mild to Moderate Disabilities            

SED 4310 Discipline and Classroom Management

SED 4320 Classroom Considerations and the IEP for Special Education Students

SED 4330 Diagnosing and Remediating Mathematics Problems

SED 4340 Diagnosing and Remediating Reading and Writing Problems

SED 4360 Professional Seminar for Special Education Teacher Candidates

SED 4960 Internship for Special Education Teacher Candidates 

27

Content Area Option (13-16 depending upon selection)

Special Education majors are required to select one of the three (3) content areas:

English Language Arts/ELA Content Area (15 hours)

ENG 3460. Aspects of the English Language (3); ENG 3710. English Grammar (3); RDG course (3); RDG 3100. Teaching with Children’s Literature (3); RDG 3200. Diagnosis and Remediation of Reading Difficulties (3)

Mathematics Content Area (13-15 hours)

MAT 1070. College Algebra (3)/MAT 1080. Plane Trigonometry (3) OR MAT 1090. Precalculus (4); MAT 1080. Plane Trigonometry (3); MAT 2110. Survey of Geometry (3); MAT 2210. Calculus I (4); MAT 2500. Introduction to Teaching Mathematics in Middle and Secondary Schools (2)

Science Content Area (16 hours)

PHS 1100. Physical Science I (3); PHS 1110. Physical Science II (3); GLY 1150. Earth Science (3); SCE 3000. Early Experiences for Prospective Science Teachers (1); SCE 3010. Early Laboratory Experiences for Prospective Science Teachers (3); SCE 3500. The Teaching of Science in the Middle Grades (3)

13-16

 

Total:  124-127

 

 

ACADEMICALLY AND INTELLECTUALLY GIFTED (AIG) EDUCATION ADD-ON LICENSURE

Coordinator: Karen Granger                   Location: Department of Educational Specialties

This program is designed to lead to North Carolina add-on licensure in Education of the Academically or Intellectually Gifted (AIG), K-12.  This add-on licensure program requires 12 semester hours of study beyond licensure in an academic content area or grade level.  The required courses for the AIG Licensure program at UNCP will be taught as fully online class sessions.  Upon completion of the program, students can add this area to either the Standard Professional I or “M” license. A valid North Carolina Teaching License and a Plan of Study from the School of Education are required.

 

Course Requirements

Sem. Hrs.

SED 3050 Introduction to Gifted Education

SED 4060 Differentiating Instruction for the Gifted

SED 4830 Methods and Models of Gifted Education

SED 4840 Trends and Issues in Gifted Education/Social and Emotional Needs of Gifted Students

3

3

3

3

 

Total : 12

 

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