Mark Canada

 

Language means everything.  Both our key to the world outside and the most human part of ourselves, language empowers and defines us.  Our parents remember our first words, and our children remember our last.  To know our world and ourselves, then, we must know our language. 

 

In my work as an English professor and an administrator at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke, I strive to give students the guidance, the tools, and, above all, the practice to become masters of their language.  By reading and writing regularly, engaging in discussions, and giving presentations, my students learn language by using it.  Along the way, they grow in other ways, as well, as they interpret facts and opinions, collaborate in groups, conduct research, and explore their rich literary heritage. 

 

An active reader and writer myself, I also regularly engage in scholarship in my area of specialization, American literature.  My current and recent projects include Literature and Journalism in Antebellum America (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011), “The Critique of Journalism in Sister Carrie” (American Literary Realism, 2010), Poe in His Right Mind (submitted to a university press), and “Learning to Scribble with Benjamin Franklin” (in process).  I also serve on the editorial board of the Edgar Allan Poe Review and the board of directors for the Thomas Wolfe Society.

 

After chairing the Department of English and Theatre over the past year and a half, I have recently begun serving as associate dean in the College of Arts and Sciences.  In both positions, I have worked to create an atmosphere in which faculty can provide the best educational experience to our students, produce valuable scholarship and creative work, and serve the university and larger communities.  Outside of these two positions, I have chaired UNCP’s Student Success Steering Committee and worked extensively in the areas of accreditation, student and faculty recruitment, and faculty development and evaluation.

mark_canada_2

 

Mark Canada, Ph.D.

Associate Dean

Professor of English

UNC-Pembroke

910.521.6431

mark.canada@uncp.edu

www.uncp.edu/home/canada

 

 

 

 

Background

 

Years ago, as I watched my infant daughter trying to absorb the intricacies of the belt in her car seat, I understood a personality trait that perhaps led me to become a teacher: I like success. I don't favor any special kind, such as financial success—thank goodness—but rather the general fulfillment of potential, what the English poet Gerard Manley Hopkins called “the achieve of; the mastery of the thing.” Like Benjamin Franklin, another favorite of mine, I believe humans have tremendous potential, and I can think of no more appropriate or fulfilling job for me than helping them to realize that potential.

 

Another guiding principle of my life and career has been a love for language.  Growing up in Indianapolis, I wrote stories, worked for my high school newspaper, and headed off to Indiana University, where I majored in journalism and English.  After my graduation in 1989, I went to work for the Johnson County Daily Journal, where I edited stories on deadline, wrote articles and headlines, laid out pages, and managed the weekly section on religion.  After two years at the Daily Journal, I joined the staff of the Fort Wayne News-Sentinel. 

 

After earning my Ph.D. in English in 1997, I accepted a position at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke.  There, working among a group of talented and dedicated colleagues, I have realized my calling.  Drawing on my interests in both self-realization and language, I strive to help students achieve their potential as readers, writers, and thinkers.

Education

Ph.D., English, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, May 1997, Major: American literature before 1900. Minor: English language.

M.A., English, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, May 1994.

B.A., English and journalism, Indiana University at Bloomington, May 1989, graduation with highest distinction.

 

Selected Positions

Chair, Department of English and Theatre, UNC-Pembroke, 2009-present

Assistant Chair, Department of English and Theatre, UNC-Pembroke, 2008-2009

English Professor, UNC-Pembroke, 1997-present

Adjunct Instructor, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2001-present

Copy Editor, The News-Sentinel, Fort Wayne, Indiana, 1991-1992.
Copy Editor, Daily Journal, Franklin, Indiana, 1989-1991.

Selected Honors

Board of Governors’ Award for Excellence in Teaching, University of North Carolina, 2008.

Outstanding Teacher Award, UNC-Pembroke, 2000.
Phi Beta Kappa, Indiana University, 1989.
Vice-President's Scholar, Indiana University, Bloomington, 1988.

 

Hobbies and Interests

Travel

Triathlons

Youth baseball

 

Teaching

 

Since joining the faculty at UNCP, I have taught more than a dozen undergraduate and graduate courses, including an online grammar course for UNC-Chapel Hill.  My efforts have been recognized with two teaching awards, including the University of North Carolina’s Board of Governors’ Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2008.

 

The cornerstone of my teaching philosophy is personal engagement.  I seek to know my students as individual human beings—each with his or her own set of values, strengths, and aspirations—and to provide them with personalized learning experiences that inspire and engage them.  For starters, I make a point of learning every one of my students’ names on the first day of class.  I joke with them that now I can call on them—and I do.  Indeed, conversation is one hallmark of my teaching.  Whether they are critiquing a classmate’s argument during peer review or studying symbolism in an online discussion, my students grow accustomed to my questions: “Why do you think that?”  “What evidence suggests that reading to you?”  “That’s a great observation.  What do you make of that?”

 

These conversations, which begin on the first day of class, continue throughout the semester.  In a typical week, my students might read an argument or a novel, respond to it in a “Think Fast” quiz, discuss it in groups, and reflect on their new knowledge in a “Think Again” post on the Web.  I also meet with students in conferences, where our focus is always on their work, their skills, their questions.  Finally, I respond to their work in progress reports, where I provide detailed guidance tailored to their own abilities and performance.

 

If we can help students to become invested in their own learning—to see it as important, even inspiring—they will do the bulk of the work.  Outside the classroom, I provide online lessons featuring objectives, links to relevant resources, and other material.  In class, I supplement my comments with photographs, paintings, maps, and other things to see and do.  On several occasions, I have taken education beyond the campus, leading trips to Philadelphia, Boston, and other locations.  Above all, I seize opportunities to help students see the relevance of language and literature in their lives. 

 

I wish I could say that every student I have taught has gone away a changed person.  I can’t.  Like all teachers, I have had my moments of frustration, but I also have had moments of another cast.  Once, in a senior seminar, I asked a question about research, and a student came up with the perfect answer; he was the same student I had taught in composition years ago.  He got it.  I also have seen a student who did not pass composition with me one semester return and, through hard work and determination, pass the class.  She got it.  Each is a little closer to his or her potential.  I hope they found some satisfaction in those accomplishments.  I know I have.

Selected Courses

ENG 1060: Composition 2

ENG 201: Southern Literature

ENG 203: Introduction to Literature

ENG 2230: American Literature Before 1865

ENGL 313: Grammar of Current English

ENG 3430: The American Novel

ENG 3460: Aspects of the English Language

ENGS 4290: Literature and Journalism

ENGS 5060: Literature and Journalism

ENG 507: Biblical Literature

FRS 1000: Freshman Seminar

 

Teaching Strategies and Assignments

“Think Fast” exercises

“Think Again” reflections

Live and online discussions

Group activities

Peer review

Student-authored Internet resources

Portfolios

Student presentations

Multimedia lectures

Online lessons and podcasts

Field trips

Personalized progress reports

 

Selected Educational Travel

“Lewis, Clark, and You!” Junior Enrichment Experience for North Carolina Teaching Fellows, May 2004.

“A New Orleans Feast,” Junior Enrichment Experience for North Carolina Teaching Fellows, May 2003.

“Colonial Williamsburg,” Junior Enrichment Experience for North Carolina Teaching Fellows, June 2002.

“Beginning in Boston,” Junior Enrichment Experience for North Carolina Teaching Fellows, June 2001.

“Philadelphia in the Life of America,” Junior Enrichment Experience for North Carolina Teaching Fellows, 2000.

 

Internet Resources

All American, literary and historical guide featuring student work

Benjamin Franklin, overview of his life and work

Be Your Best, guide to study strategies

The Lewis and Clark Expedition, overview of the expedition

The Grammar Hardware Store, resource on English grammar

Guide to Library Research, tutorial created with librarian Michael Alewine

 

 

 


 



Scholarship

 

My scholarly interests center on early American literature, particularly the works of Benjamin Franklin, Edgar Allan Poe, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and other writers of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.  I also have published articles and given presentations on a variety of other subjects in the fields of literature, history, and pedagogy.

 

Much of my current scholarship has focused on the intersections of literature and journalism.  Literature and Journalism in Antebellum America, forthcoming from Palgrave Macmillan, examines print culture in the United States between 1833 and 1861, when the simultaneous rise of the mainstream press and the advent of the American Renaissance combined to create a sibling rivalry in American letters.  As part of this competition, authors such as Poe and Henry David Thoreau excoriated and ridiculed journalism, defended their own versions of the truth, and crafted “news of their own” in “The Mystery of Marie Roget,” Walden, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, and other works.  In chapters such as “The Story and the Truth,” “Encounters with the News,” “Literary Critiques of Journalism,” and “Dispatches from the Fringe,” this book shows that authors and journalists, while sharing common aims and methods, ultimately developed different conceptions and conventions of truth-telling.  In this historical and interdisciplinary study, I draw on poems, short stories, novels, essays, and news items by Poe, Thoreau, Stowe, James Fenimore Cooper, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Emily Dickinson, Rebecca Harding Davis, William Cullen Bryant, James Gordon Bennett, and Samuel Bowles, as well as secondary sources by David Reynolds, Shelley Fisher Fishkin, Thomas C. Leonard, Andie Tucher, Hazel Dicken-Garcia, Dan Schiller, David Nord, and numerous other scholars of literature and journalism history.  While the book focuses on the antebellum era, the introduction and epilogue suggest connections between this period and our own, in which a new media revolution again raises questions about stories and truths.  Part of this book appeared as “News of Her Own: Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Investigative Fiction” in the Ignatius Critical Edition of Uncle Tom’s Cabin (2009).  I also have examined Theodore Dreiser’s views on newspapers in “The Critique of Journalism in Sister Carrie,” published in a 2010 issue of American Literary Realism, and published an essay on Thomas Wolfe’s relationship with journalism in a 2003 issue of The Thomas Wolfe Review. 

 

I also have worked extensively on the psychology of Edgar Allan Poe.  Details of Poe's life and work—including his fascination with music, dreams, and the “Imp of the Perverse”—suggest that he possessed an extraordinary right cerebral hemisphere.  By exploring these details in light of both current and nineteenth-century models of the divided brain, I have tried to expose the process by which Poe used his unusual brain and his knowledge of phrenology to produce works unique in their visual imagery, musicality, surreal details, emotional appeals, and potent effect on readers.  Poe in His Right Mind, my study of the role of the right brain in Poe’s life and work, has been submitted to a university press.  Two essays on this subject, “The Right Brain in Poe’s Creative Process” and “Flight into Fancy: Poe’s Discovery of the Right Brain,” have appeared in The Southern Quarterly and The Southern Literary Journal.

 

Another American author, Benjamin Franklin, has figured prominently in both my teaching and my scholarship.  I regularly teach a themed section of first-year composition on Franklin’s life and work, and I have drawn on this experience to write “Learning to Scribble with Benjamin Franklin,” which is set to appear in the MLA volume Approaches to Teaching Franklin’s Autobiography.  I will discuss this subject in a presentation at the ASECS meeting in Vancouver in 2011.  I also have written an essay on Franklin for the Encyclopedia of American Literature, forthcoming from Facts on File, and an essay on the literature of the eighteenth century for a volume of American Centuries: The Ideas, Issues, and Trends that Made U.S. History, forthcoming from MTM/Facts on File.

 

My experience as a researcher in the field of literature, along with my work as a composition teacher, has shaped my interest in the related subject of information literacy.  Over the past decade, I have collaborated with librarian Michael Alewine on an online tutorial, Guide to Library Research, as well as dozens of class sessions for students in first-year composition courses.  This past summer, we began working on a textbook, The Concise Guide to Information Literacy.  In this information age, students and professionals must be able to manage information effectively.  This textbook, designed particularly for students in upper-division courses in all disciplines, will provide an accessible discussion of information literacy, review basic strategies for finding and evaluating information in both print and electronic resources, and offer practical tips for managing research projects, narrowing topics, developing key words, navigating databases, evaluating a source’s credibility, decoding a call number, discriminating among various types of primary and secondary sources, ordering items through interlibrary loan, using an index, incorporating source material into a report or argument, avoiding plagiarism, compiling bibliographies, and transferring research skills to the workplace.  In short, The Concise Guide to Information Literacy will empower students to put information to work for them.  We have drafted a prospectus, as well as a sample chapter, and plan to propose the project to a leading textbook publisher this fall.

 

Outside these four areas, my scholarship has ranged over a number of topics in the fields of literature, history, and pedagogy.  I have published essays and given presentations on the twentieth-century writers Vardis Fisher and H.L. Mencken, for example, and I have given presentations on Mencken and the Scopes Trial, the Lewis and Clark expedition, and the use of technology in composition and literature classes.  Some of this work has taken me outside academia to address general audiences.  My presentations on Mencken and the Lewis and Clark expedition, for instance, were part of the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill’s Adventures in Ideas series, an enrichment program that promotes lifelong learning.  I also have addressed in-service teachers as part of a seminar called “Darwin and the South,” sponsored by the Center for the Study of the American South in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.  In 2008, I gave the keynote address at UNCP’s winter commencement.  I also have served as an expert on Gothic literature for a public radio program called The State of Things and as a source on Benjamin Franklin for an article on a business Web site.

 

Finally, I contribute to literary scholarship in two indirect ways.  As a member of the editorial board for the Edgar Allan Poe Review, I consider submissions and recommend appropriate ones for publication.  I also serve on the board of directors for the Thomas Wolfe Society.

 

 

Book

Literature and Journalism in Antebellum America (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011)

 

Series Volume

Developing and Implementing Service-Learning Programs. New Directions for Higher Education 114 (Summer 2001). Co-editor with Bruce W. Speck.

 

Articles in Periodicals

“The Critique of Journalism in Sister Carrie.” American Literary Realism 42.3 (Spring 2010): 227-242.

“The Paperboy Turned Novelist: Thomas Wolfe and Journalism.” The Thomas Wolfe Review 27.1-2 (Winter-Spring 2003): 70-78.

“Assessing E-folios in the Online Class.” New Directions for Teaching and Learning 91 (September 2002).

“Flight into Fancy: Poe's Discovery of the Right Brain.” The Southern Literary Journal 33.2 (Spring 2001): 62-79.

“The Internet in Service-Learning.” New Directions for Higher Education 114 (Summer 2001): 45-50.

“Students As Seekers in On-line Courses.” New Directions for Teaching and Learning 84 (Winter 2000): 35-40.

“The Right Brain in Poe's Creative Process.” The Southern Quarterly 36.4 (Summer 1998): 96-105.

 

Essays in Books

“News of Her Own: Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Investigative Fiction.” Ignatius critical edition of Uncle Tom’s Cabin. Ed. Mary R. Reichardt. Fort Collins, Colorado: Ignatius, 2009.

“Vardis Fisher: An Essay in Bibliography.” Rediscovering Vardis Fisher: Centennial Essays. Moscow: University of Idaho Press, 2000.

 

Articles in Reference Volumes

“Literature,” American Centuries, Vol. 3, ed. Brendan McConville, forthcoming from MTM/Facts on File.

“Benjamin Franklin.” Encyclopedia of American Literature. New York: Facts on File, forthcoming.

“Edgar Allan Poe.” Southern Writers: A New Biographical Dictionary. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2006.

“Hodding Carter.” Southern Writers: A New Biographical Dictionary. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2006.

“Thomas Holley Chivers.” Southern Writers: A New Biographical Dictionary. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2006.

“Anne Moody.” Southern Writers: A New Biographical Dictionary. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2006.

“The Short Story, Beginnings to 1900.” The Companion to Southern Literature. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2001.

“Sheriff.” The Companion to Southern Literature. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2001.

“Thomas Dunn English.” American National Biography. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.

“Frederick Kemper Freeman.” American National Biography. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.

 

Reviews

Review of The Magical Campus: University of North Carolina Writings, 1917-1920. The Thomas Wolfe Review 32.1-2 (2008): 136-138.

Review of The Cambridge Introduction to Edgar Allan Poe. The Edgar Allan Poe Review 10.1 (Spring 2009): 63-65.

“How the Mind Turns Language into Meaning.” Review of The Ascent of Babel. American Speech 76:2 (Summer 2001): 213-215.

 

Selected Presentations

“Truthful Hoaxes: Poe, Literature, and the ‘dirty newspapers.’” Edgar Allan Poe Conference. Philadelphia, PA. October 2009.

“Mencken’s Monkey: Whose Back Was It Riding?” Darwin and the South. Chapel Hill, NC. June 2009.

“Extra! Lethean Waters Threaten Oracle!: The Critique of Journalism in Sister Carrie.” American Literature Association Conference. Boston, MA. May 2009.

“The Scholar’s Identity.” Alpha Chi Induction Ceremony. UNCP. January 2009.

“This Is Our Story.” Commencement Address. UNCP. December 2008.

“Turn East, Turn Complacent: Mark Twain’s Journalistic Decline.” Western Literature Association Conference. Boulder, CO. October 2008.

“H.L. Mencken: The Great Iconoclast.” “Political Satire from Mark Twain to The Daily Show.” Adventures in Ideas series. UNC-CH. June 2008.

“The Portrait of a Journalist: Henrietta Stackpole and the Failings of the Press.” Reading Henry James Colloquium. Salem, MA. May 2007.

“The Story and the Truth.” Joint Journalism Historians Conference. New York, NY. March 2007.

“Using Blackboard to Teach Freshman Composition Students the Research Process.” With Michael Alewine. UNC Teaching and Learning with Technology Conference. March 2006.

“’Dear Fred’ . . . ‘Dear Vardis’: A Friendship in Letters.” With Joseph Flora. Western Literature Association Conference. Los Angeles, CA. October 2005.

“Corps of Discovery, Diplomacy, Science, and Survival.” Adventures in Ideas series. UNC-CH. September 2004.

“The Paperboy Turned Novelist: Thomas Wolfe and Journalism.” Annual meeting of Thomas Wolfe Society. Burlington, VT. June 2003.

“Teaching Literature Online: A New Twist on Student-centered Learning.” The Teaching Literature Conference. Rutgers University. New Brunswick, NJ. March 2001.

“Real Work, or How Students and I Learned to Like Composition.” South Atlantic Modern Language Association Conference. Birmingham, AL. November 2000.

 

Works in Progress

Poe in His Right Mind, submitted to a university press.

“Learning to Scribble with Benjamin Franklin,” tentatively accepted for publication in Approaches to Teaching Franklin’s Autobiography, eds. Jeffrey A. Weinstock and Carla Mulford, forthcoming from MLA.

“Ultimate Thule,” tentatively accepted for publication in Poe in Context, ed. Kevin Hayes, forthcoming from Cambridge University Press.

The Concise Guide to Information Literacy, with Michael Alewine, to be proposed to a textbook publisher.

“Learning to ‘scribble’ with Benjamin Franklin: A Founding Father in the Composition Classroom,” accepted for presentation at the ASECS meeting in Vancouver, Canada, in 2011.

 

Memberships

Editorial Board, Edgar Allan Poe Review

Board of Directors, Thomas Wolfe Society

Poe Studies Association

American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies

 


 



Service

 

Like my scholarship, my service ranges over a variety of areas, but focuses on a few.  I have been particularly active in the areas of administration, retention and student success, assessment and planning, faculty evaluation and hiring, professional development, and recruitment.

 

As chair of the Department of English and Theatre, I strive to create an atmosphere in which faculty can provide the best educational experience to our students, produce useful scholarship and creative work, and serve the university and larger communities.  As part of my regular duties, I manage faculty lines, recruit and hire faculty, observe and evaluate faculty, create schedules of course offerings, respond to student needs and grievances, make decisions concerning my department’s budget, run department and committee meetings, oversee department communications via e-mail and Blackboard posts, manage data and respond punctually to requests for information from the university’s administration, and advise students and colleagues in areas ranging from course selection to classroom management to scholarly production to issues related to promotion and tenure.  As assistant chair and chair, I also have launched a number of initiatives, including a new Blackboard communication system for sharing department news and reports, a new “A Brief Guide to English and Theatre” for incoming faculty, faculty sessions on library resources and careers for majors, and a position for a graduate research assistant.  During my first year as chair, the department created its first three-year schedule of upper-level classes in many years, increased its online literature course offerings, secured funding from Academic Affairs to continue its successful “Plus One” program for first-year composition, scheduled several composition labs in computer classrooms for the first time, dramatically revised and expanded its Web site, hired four new tenure-track faculty members, and placed or published six books and more than two dozen essays and poems in journals and other publications.  More information appears in the department’s 2010 annual report.

 

Outside my department, I have helped UNCP develop a plan for retaining students and helping them to succeed in college.  As chair of the Student Success Steering Committee in 2009-2010, I collaborated with nearly 20 colleagues from across the campus on an extensive, research-based list of recommendations for improving student success at UNCP.  This report calls for numerous initiatives, including the creation of a campus advising mission statement and online resources for advisers, expansions of the Academic Resource Mentor and Supplemental Instruction programs, the addition of a second-semester Freshman Seminar course for targeted students, and the establishment of a “one-stop shop,” where students can receive help with financial aid, registration, and other services.

 

In the areas of accreditation and planning, I have been an active member of the committee developing UNCP’s Quality Enhancement Plan, a requirement for SACS accreditation.  After serving on the committee that solicited input on the topic of the QEP, I went on to serve on the QEP Steering Committee.  In addition to collaborating with my colleagues on the development of the plan, which focuses on the improvement of student writing at UNCP, I drafted a description of the selection process for the final report, addressed the SACS team during its campus visit, and participated in telephone interviews for candidates applying to serve as the QEP director.  The SACS team that evaluated the QEP approved it with no recommendations, and the lead QEP evaluator praised it as a potential model for universities across the country.

 

In my roles serving on various other campus committees, I have had a hand in the development of assessment plans for individual departments, the establishment of learning communities, and the development of the university’s honors college.  As a member of my department's Graduate Committee on English Education, I helped to revise our graduate program to make it even more rewarding and rigorous. In particular, I took a leading role in the development of a new capstone experience, which involves both a portfolio and a presentation. 

 

Over the years, I also have been active in the evaluation and selection of faculty, including both English instructors and librarians.  Recently, I have begun working with a UNCP task force to address issues regarding the hiring, evaluation, and compensation of temporary faculty.  Furthermore, as a member of dozens of review and search committees, I have evaluated portfolios and applications, scheduled campus visits, conducted interviews, and observed numerous instructors in the classroom.

 

My service in the area of professional development has taken a variety of forms.  As a longtime member of UNCP’s Task Force for Teaching Excellence, I have helped to select recipients of faculty grants and to plan the university’s annual Faculty Development Day.  I also have planned or given a number of presentations on pedagogy for my colleagues, served as a faculty mentor, and chaired the committee charged with establishing UNCP’s Administrative Fellows Program.  Finally, as chair of the Program Committee for the South Atlantic Modern Language Association, I helped shape the program of the 2007 conference, which introduced a poster session.

 

When I am sold on something, I enjoy sharing my enthusiasm for it with others.  For this reason, recruitment comes naturally to me.  As a member of my department’s recruitment committee, I wrote the copy for our brochure on the English major, and I regularly represent my department at the university’s admission open houses.  I also manage the department’s Web site and contribute material to it.  On the university level, I have accepted several invitations to appear in recruitment collateral materials, including television advertisements and a video created for the Internet site UniversityTV.com, and have represented UNCP in Italy, speaking to a group of students from a Department of Defense school in Vicenza.

 

Student development has long been an interest of mine.  In addition to teaching freshman seminar on several occasions, I have served as an advisor on textbooks for this course and recently became co-chair of a task force on the first-year experience for UNCP students.  As a faculty athletic associate, I also serve as an advisor for the UNCP track team and have joined one of my colleagues to give a workshop on time management and study skills for the athletes.

 

Outside of these areas, I have served my department, my university, and the larger community in a number of ways.  As chair of my department’s Instructional Resources Committee, I coordinated my colleagues’ requests for books and other media and helped develop policy for the use of computer labs and other resources.  Within my department, I also have advised majors and played active roles in several departmental initiatives, including a revision of our English major.  On the campus level, I have served as a mentor to Teaching Fellows and helped select the recipients of faculty awards.  In the local community, I have addressed both adult and juvenile book clubs and have served as the president of the Central Carolinas Phi Beta Kappa Association, which sponsors cultural programs and awards scholarships to high school students. 

 

Assessment and Planning

Quality Enhancement Plan Steering Committee. University of North Carolina at Pembroke. 2007-present.

Quality Enhancement Plan Selection Committee. UNCP. 2007-2008.

Assessment Committee. UNCP. 2004-2005.

Learning Communities Committee. UNCP. 2004-2005.

Honors Committee. UNCP. Fall 1999.

Strategic Planning Task Force. UNCP. November 1998-April 1999.

SACS Technology Committee. UNCP. April 1998-1999.

Graduate Committee on English Education. English, Theatre, and Languages. UNCP. October 1997-December 2000.

 

Faculty Evaluation

First-Year Review Committee for Dr. Melissa Schaub. UNCP. English, Theatre, and Languages. Spring 2009.

Review Committee for Mark Williams. Chair. UNCP. English, Theatre, and Languages. Spring 2009.

Tenure Review Committee for Dr. Karen Helgeson. Chair. English and Theatre. UNCP. Fall 2008.

Post-tenure Review Committee for Dr. Nancy Barrineau. English and Theatre. UNCP. Fall 2008.

First-Year Review Committee for Dr. Youngsuk Chae. UNCP. English, Theatre, and Languages. Spring 2008.

First-Year Review Committee for Librarian Robert Wolf. UNCP. Fall 2006.

Tenure Review Committee for Librarian Carl Danis. UNCP. Fall 2006.

Post-tenure Review Committee for Dr. Patricia Valenti. Chair. English, Theatre, and Languages. UNCP. Fall 2005.

Review Committee for Librarian Robert Arndt. UNCP. 2004-2005.

Review Committee for Instructor Frank Myers. UNCP. Fall 2004.

First-year Review Committee for Librarian Carl Danis. UNCP. 2003-2004.

First-year Review Committee for Librarian Robert Arndt. UNCP. 2003-2004.

Post-tenure Review Committee for Dr. Monika Brown. Chair. English, Theatre, and Languages. UNCP. Fall 2003.

Tenure Review Committee for Dr. Kay McClanahan. Chair. English, Theatre, and Languages. UNCP. Fall 2003.

First-year Review Committee for Dr. Roger Ladd. Chair. English, Theatre, and Languages. UNCP. Fall 2003.

First-year Review Committee for Dr. Jon Lewis. English, Theatre, and Languages. UNCP. Fall 2003.

First-year Review Committee for Dr. Melissa Schaub. Chair. English, Theatre, and Languages. UNCP. Fall 2003.

 

Hiring

Task Force on Temporary Faculty. UNCP. Spring 2009.

Search Committee for Composition Instructors. English and Theatre. UNCP. Fall 2008.

Search Committee for Linguistics Professor. English and Theatre. UNCP. Fall 2007-present.

Search Committee for Composition Professor. Chair. English, Theatre, and Languages. UNCP. 2005-2006.

Search Committee for Instructional Designer. UNCP. 2004- 2005.

Search Committee for Literature Professors. Chair. English, Theatre, and Languages. UNCP. Spring 2003.

Search Committee for ETL Librarian. UNCP. Spring 2001.

Search Committee for Associate Provost for Outreach. Chair. UNCP. Fall 2000.

Search Committee for Writing Center Director. UNCP. Summer 1999.

Search Committee for Reference Librarian. UNCP. Fall 2000.

Search Committee for Journalism Professor. UNCP. Spring 1999.

 

Professional Development

Faculty Mentor. English, Theatre, and Languages. UNCP. 2007-2008.

Program Committee. South Atlantic Modern Language Association. Spring 2003-Fall 2007. (Chair: Fall 2006-Fall 2007.)

Awards Committee. UNCP. Fall 2001-Spring 2003.

Executive Steering Committee. Southern American Studies Association. 2000-2002.

Administrative Fellows Committee. Chair. UNCP. Fall 1999-present.

Task Force for Teaching Excellence. UNCP. Fall 1999-present.

“Pedagogical Possibilities of the Internet.” Presenter. Faculty development workshop. UNCP. April and August 1997.

The World Wide Classroom.” Presenter. Faculty development workshop. UNCP. Fall 1997.

 

Recruitment and Outreach

Scholars Council. UNCP. Fall 2010.

Recording of UNCP advertisement for Sky Radio. October 2008.

Interview of Scott Turow. WNCP-TV. May 2008.

Appearance in recruitment video for UniversityTV.com. April 2008.

Appearance on Academe Today. WNCP. September 2004.

Recruitment Committee. English, Theatre, and Languages. UNCP. Fall 2003-present.

 

Student Development and Retention

Student Success Steering Committee. Chair. UNCP. Fall 2009-Spring 2010.

Task Force on Freshman Seminar. UNCP. Spring 2009.

Workshop on study skills. UNCP. February 2009.

Faculty athletic associate for track team. UNCP. Spring 2009.

 

Other

“A Brief Guide to English and Theatre.” English, Theatre, and Languages. UNCP. Summer 2009.

Syllabus template. English, Theatre, and Languages. UNCP. Spring 2008.

President. Central Carolinas Phi Beta Kappa Association. January 2007-present.

UNC in Washington Committee. UNCP. Fall 2005-present.

Appeals Committee. Chair. English, Theatre, and Languages. UNCP. Spring 2005-present.

Ad Hoc Committee on Continuing Education Units. UNCP. Fall 2003.

Mentor. North Carolina Teaching Fellows. UNCP. 2000-present.

Faculty Conciliator. UNCP. 2000-2002.

Instructional Resources Committee. Chair. English, Theatre, and Languages. UNCP. Fall 1999-present.

Web Site Administrator. English and Theatre. UNCP. 1998-present.

Food Services Committee. UNCP. 1997-1998.