The University of North Carolina at Pembroke
ECN 203 Principles of Macroeconomics
Dr. Frederick's sections
Fall 2003


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Syllabus

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Attendance
Withdrawing

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Macroeconomics, by McConnell and Brue
15th edition (2002)
Published by McGraw-Hill/Irwin
Macroeconomics by McConnell and Brue


Syllabus
 Date Chapter
Topic Suggested
Exercises
Aug. 26 Introduction
1 Appendix
Introduction: Some graphs
28 1
Economic methods, basic questions





Sept  2
2
Scarcity and choices, 
4
2
Production Possibilities Curves




9 3
Demand and Supply

10 3
Equilibrium between demand and supply





16
5
The players in the economy: households, businesses, government
18
1,2,3,5
EXAM 1





23 7
Measuring output and prices

25 8
Business cycles: unemployment and inflation





30 9
The components of aggregate expenditure

Oct.  2
9






7
10
Changes in equilibrium: The Keynesian multiplier

9
10
Changes in equilibrium with government





14
7-10
EXAM 2
16
Midsemester Break




21 11
Including prices: Aggregate Supply and Aggregate Demand
23 11
Equilibrium





28 12
Fiscal policy

30
12






Nov   4
13
Money and banking

6
13
The Federal Reserve System





11
14
Money creation

13
14
The money multiplier





18
15
Tools of monetary policy

20
15
Effectiveness of monetary policy





25
12-15
EXAM 3

27

Thanksgiving





Dec.  2
16
Aggregate Supply

4
18
Deficits and Debt





Dec. 11

FINAL  EXAM
Section 01 (TR at 11:00) Exam is 10:30 to 12:30
Section 02 (TR at  2:00)  Exam is   1:00 to   3:00

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  This course offers an overall picture of the operation of our economy.  The course focuses on how the economic system determines the level of national income, the unemployment rate, and the rate of inflation.  Fiscal, monetary, and supply-side policies are discussed.

COURSE GOALS:  The purpose of this course is to give you an understanding of the way that a market economy works.  As a member of our society you will benefit from having a better perspective on the economic policies of federal, state, and local governments.  This course explains the effects of taxes, government spending, the money supply, and exchange rates, on overall economic activity, unemployment, and inflation in a country.

GENERAL EDUCATION NOTE: This course is the second of two courses which survey the social institutions we call our economic system.  The perspective of this course is that of the citizen or policymaker, not of the business owner.  As liberal arts course, it encourages the student to take the broader view of business activities and to think critically and analytically.

**************  INFORMATION BELOW THIS LINE HAS NOT BEEN UPDATED YET **************

GRADING: Your grade for the course will be determined by an average of four things: your the best three of your first for exam scores and final exam score.  The weights are as follows:
 

First Exam 20%
Second Exam 20%
Third Exam 20%
Fourth Exam 20%
Fifth Exam 20%

Letter grades will be assigned according to the weighted average on the following scale.
 

At
Least
Less
Than

Grade
92 101 A
88 92 A-
84 88 B+
80 84 B
76 80 B-
72 76 C+
68 72 C
64 68 C-
60 64 D+
56 60 D
52 56 D-
  0 52 F

In borderline cases (which I define as having a weighted average within one-half point of one of the numbers above), I will decide whether to give you the higher grade based on an apparent trend in your grades, the nature of your questions and comments during class, your attendance, and my subjectiveopinion of you as a student.  You must have gotten the higher grade or better on an exam to receive the higher grade for the course.

EXAMS:  There will be five exams during this course counting the Final Exam.  These exams will include multiple-choice questions which may include rough (not verbatim) definitions, concepts, applications, or calculations.  Make-up exams for the first four exams will not be allowed, but the lowest of the first four exam scores will be dropped.  Make-up exams for the Final Exam will be allowed in cases of documented medical reasons, and death in your immediate family, or documented job conflicts.  Make-ups for the Final Exam must be completed before the last day of classes of the Fall 2001 term.

EXERCISES: You should do the exercises indicated on the syllabus for each chapter after you read the chapter as a way of testing your knowledge. The exercises will not be graded, but we may occasionally discuss them in class. Do not tear pages from your textbook.

QUIZZES:  I will occasionally give quizzes at the end of the class period. I will  collect these quizzes but the scores from these quizzes will not affect your grade.  That are learning exercises only.

ATTENDANCE:  Attendance will not directly affect your grade.  Regular attendance is expected, however.  Last term, there was a noticeable correlation between attendance and the grade received. In border-line situations I may use attendance or class participation to determine whether you  will receive the higher or lower grade.  My experience indicates the good students do attend class regularly. In keeping with University policy, I will notify the Office of Freshman Seminar and Academic Advertisement when a student misses three consecutive class sessions or attends less than 75% of the class sessions.

CHEATING: Cheating may result in a grade of "F" for the course.  Collaboration is encouraged on the homework exercises, but the work you turn it should be your own.  On the exams and quizzes cheating includes allowing someone to copy from your work. Refer to the Student Handbook for more information about cheating.

DISABLED STUDENTS: Any student with a documented disability needing academic adjustments is required to directly notify Disability Support Services and the instructor of such needs as early in the semester as possible (preferably within the first week of class) if the student expects to receive special accomodations for the disability.  All discussions regarding needs and disabilities will remain confidential.

DROPPING THE COURSE: If you find that it is in your best interest to withdraw from the course, be sure to file the necessary withdrawal forms with the Registrar's Office. If you simply stop coming without filling out  the form, you will receive zeros for your remaining exams and exercises, which will probably result in an F for the course.  To receive a grade of W, you must submit a withdrawal form by the deadline.  The last day to drop the course if you want to remain in other courses is Tuesday, May 31, 2001.  The last day to withdraw from all classes is Thursday, June 7, 2001.

last updated August 5, 2003, by James R. Frederick