Resources for High School Teachers
in Southeastern North Carolina
 
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WELCOME

"Teaching African American Literature: Resources for High School Teachers in Southeastern North Carolina" aims to serve as a resource for teachers in the service area of the University of North Carolina, Pembroke. For teachers who wish to introduce African American literature to their students as well as teachers who already teach African American literature, this Web site provides not only targeted, standards-based conceptual frameworks for the introduction of canonical African American authors, but engaging, creative learning activities ready for use in today's diverse classrooms. Our conviction that African American literature provides unique and important opportunities to motivate all students drives us in creating this resource.

This Web site features an array of helpful resources. A concise overview of African American literature, history, and culture provides teachers and students with a sense of the big picture of African American literature. Web pages devoted to eight canonical authors and their masterworks -- Phillis Wheatley's poetry, Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs's slave narratives, Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God, Richard Wright's Native Son, Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye, Octavia Butler's The Parable of the Sower, and Edwidge Danticat's Brother I'm Dying -- provide a conceptual framework, based on Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe's Understanding by Design, for introducing authors and texts to students. What's more, each author's page includes three learning activities, grounded in the goals and objectives of the N.C. Standard Course of Study, ready to copy and use. Finally, this Web site welcomes you to take a look at the information we collected from you, the teachers and students of southeastern North Carolina, regarding the understandings, attitudes, and preconceptions we bring to the study of African American literature.

We hope you will find this resource helpful, and we look forward to hearing from you about your experiences using this Web site.

Sincerely,
Khaled Al-Masaeed, Jamie Baldwin, Dalija Brecher, Re Gena Brown, Ellen Church, Thomasania Craft, Rebecca Few, Anna Hall, Stephanie Hammond, Scott Hicks, Kimberly Mertz, Kellen Pagan, Marcelo Saenz-Valiente, Angela Smith, Amy Taylor, Jenny Teague, and David Townsend

For comments, questions, or concerns about this Web site, please contact Professor Scott Hicks, Ph.D., of the Department of English & Theatre, the University of North Carolina, Pembroke, at scott.hicks@uncp.edu, (910) 775-4032, or P.O. Box 1510, 1 University Drive, Pembroke, N.C. 28372-1510.

Note: The framework that structures the conceptual overviews contained on this site -- "Worth being familiar with," "Important to know and do," and "Enduring understandings" -- comes from Understanding by Design, expanded 2d. ed., by Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe. Alexandria, Va.: ASCD. © 2005 by ASCD. Reprinted with permission. All rights reserved. Learn more about ASCD at http://www.ascd.org.

 
  2008 | Last rev. April 13, 2009

 
OVERVIEW OF AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE
This concise overview of African American literature, history, and culture provides teachers and students with a sense of the big picture of African American literature.

"UNDERSTANDING BY DESIGN"
Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe's effective and comprehensive framework, "Understanding by Design," inspire and guide these resources. Click here to learn more.

PRIMARY RESEARCH
Through surveys, graduate students iin Prof. Hicks's fall 2008 graduate seminar, ENGS 5720: African American Literary Study & Pedagogy, explored the perceptions and attitudes of high school teachers and college students of African American literature.