Sociology, Social Work and Criminal Justice

SWK 445 Human Behavior and the Social Environment, II

Instructor: Frederick H. Stephens, MSWSemester: Spring 2002
Class Location: BA Building, Room 201BTime: Thursday, 2:00-3:50
Lab Location: BA Building, Office 232Time: Office hours: Tuesday, Thursday 10-11; Wednesday 9-12; or by appointment
Section: 01 

Description
HBSE SEQUENCE PURPOSE
The purpose of the HBSE sequence is the acquisition of knowledge (for practice) of theories about the development and behavior of individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities as well as the interactions of these systems with and among one another in larger sociocultural environments.
HBSE COURSE PURPOSE
The purpose of HBSE II is to apply the basic framework for creating and organizing knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, along with social systems, life-span and strengths approaches, acquired in HBSE I, to understand family, group, i.e.) organizational and community systems. Special attention is given to the impact of human diversity, discrimination and oppression in the contexts of families, groups, organizations and communities on our ability to reach or maintain optimal health and well being.

Objectives
Upon successful completion of HBSE II and its prerequisites you will be able to demonstrate achievement of the following educational objectives:
1. Possess knowledge for application in practice of theories, emerging from both traditional and alternative paradigms, about the development and behavior of families, groups, organizations and communities;
2. Use social systems, life span, and strengths approaches to understand human behavior in family, group, organizational, and community environments;
3. Understand bio-psycho-socio-cultural influences on human behavior in the context of family, group, organizational and community environments
4. Recognize that family, in a great variety of configurations, is a central context for individual behavior and development and forms a critical intersection for linking individuals to group, organizational, institutional and community systems;
5. Understand that family, group, organizational, and community behaviors as multi-causal and mutually influenced by interactions among the various social systems;
6. Recognize that diversity is the rule rather than the exception and possess knowledge about and appreciation of diverse persons -- persons with disabilities, minority persons of color, women, gays, lesbians, persons distinguished by age, religion, socioeconomic class or culture;
7. Recognize the impact of discrimination and oppression -- based on religion, socio- economic class, culture, age, race, ethnicity, gender, disability, or sexual orientation -- in the contexts of families, groups, organizations and communities on our ability to attain social and economic justice;
8. Increase awareness of the significance of research and evaluation as essential for building and testing knowledge about HBSE necessary for effective social work practice;
9. Integrate knowledge of critical thinking skills, and values from the liberal arts and sciences and application of this knowledge through creative problem solving for effective social work practice;
10. Awareness of personal values required for addressing value and ethical conflicts necessary for the professional use of self and the assumption of a variety of social work roles;
11. Illustrate effective use of oral and written communication skills;
12. Possess an historical perspective on the development of theories and models for explaining human behavior;
13. Recognize one's own strengths and needs for continuing to develop knowledge, skills and values required for effective practice;
14. Recognize the impact of social welfare policies and services, especially those in the public sector, on the ability of individuals to reach or maintain optimal health and well being.

Course Materials
Textbook(s)
Textbook: Schriver, Joe M. (2001). Human Behavior and the Social Environment: Shifting Paradigms in Essential Knowledge for Social Work Practice (3rd ed.). Boston: Allyn and Bacon.
Reference
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Other
HBSE II Course Outline by Units and Objectives

Unit 1: Week 1: (January 10)
(Objectives 1,3,6,8,9,10,11,12,13)

CONTENT:
Review of HBSE I and Introduction to HBSE II course
Required Reading:
Text: Review Chapters 1, 2 and 3

Unit 11: Weeks 2, 3, 4: January 17, 24, 31
(Objectives, 1,2,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14)

CONTENT:
Perspectives on Families
Social Work and Families
Approaches to Understanding Familiness
Traditional Models
Alternative Models
Required Readings: Text: Chapter 6
Illustrative Reading 6.1: Quiet Success: Parenting Strengths Among African Americans

Unit III: Weeks 5, 6, 7, 8: February 7, 14, 21, 28
(NOTE: MID-TERM February 28th)
(Objectives 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14)

CONTENT:
Perspectives on Groups
Historical Perspective
Traditional and Alternative Perspectives
Process and Product Dimensions
Goals and Purposes
Membership
Stage Theories and Models
Social Systems/Ecological Perspectives
Required Reading: Text: Chapter 7
Illustrative Reading 7.1: Democracy, Diversity, and Social Capital by Chang
SPRING BREAK! March 1 -10, 2002

Unit IV: Weeks 9, 10, 11, 12: March 14, 21, 28; April 4
(Objectives 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14)

CONTENT:
Perspectives on Organizations
Historical Perspective on Organizations
Basic Concepts
Technology, Organizations, and Social Policy
Traditional Paradigms
Strengths, Weaknesses, Criticism
Alternative Paradigms
Required Reading: Text: Chapter 8
Illustrative Reading 8.1: Persons with Disabilities

Unit V: Weeks 13, 14, 15: April 11, 18, 25
(Objectives 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14)

CONTENT:
Perspectives on Community (ies)
Historical Perspectives on Community
Defining Community
Traditional Perspectives
Alternative Perspectives
Required Readings: Text: Chapter 9 and 10
Illustrative Reading: 9.1:Hip-Hop Nation: The Undeveloped Social Capital of
Black Urban America by Sullivan

Grading Policy
Attendance/Participation
Professional social work practice demands a high degree of personal commitment, engagement,
and use of self. To begin to achieve this end, students are expected to attend every class and
constructively participate in class discussions and activities. Students are expected to be on time
for class to participate fully. Students will not be allowed to make up any quizzes.

Grade Components
 Name 
 Weight 
 Subject
TEST # 1
20%
February 7, 2001
 
TEST # 2
20%
Mid-Term February 28, 2002
 
Family Analysis Project
30%
This project is designed to assist the student in understanding family functioning.
Use your knowledge of perspectives on families and analysis your family. Plese note that you
do not have to disclosure information that you think is too personal. The intent is to have you
understand traditional and alternative paradigms and how they affect families. Use the following items to
assist you in writing your analysis paper.
A. Discuss how the your family differ in terms of structure and/or functions from so-called "traditional" families.
Have these differences been greater or les pronounced in the past than they are currently?
B. Describe and discuss the strengths available in your family that served as resources for understanding and
working with families.
C. Describe the social systems with which your family linked or interacted (groups, organizations, institutions, community) and
discuss the impact of the linkages and interactions for individual family members as well as a collective whole.
D. Describe the likely consequences of discrimination and oppression on the ability of your family and their members to reach
or maintain optimal health and well-being. Suggest a family-centered policy or service that might help remove the barriers presented by discrimination
and oppression for families experiencing similiar situations.
Course Objectives higlighted: 4, 5, & 7.
DUE DATE: TO BE DISCUSSED
 
Final Examination
20%
Monday, May 6, 2002 @ 1:00-3:00
 
Attendance/Class Participation
10%
Professional social work practice demands a high degree of personal commitment,
engagement, and use of self. To begin to achieve this end, students are expected to attend class
and constructively participate in class discussions and activites.
 

Final Grades
 A: 92-100  B+: 87-89  C+: 77-79  D+: 67-69  F: 0-59  
 A-: 90-91  B: 82-86  C: 72-76  D: 62-66      
     B-: 80-81  C-: 70-71  D-: 60-61      

Attendance Policy
Attendance is consider extremely important. Excessive absences will result in lowering of grade by a letter.
I consider more than (3) missed classes, either excused or unexcused to be excessive. Students are required
to make up work if they miss classes, missing class will not be accepted as an excuse for incomplete work.

Student Conduct & Honor Code
UNCP Academic Honor Code

Giving and Taking Help
The practice of social work includes two important concepts: “process” and “outcome”.
Outcome is the degree of success in achieving a goal. Process includes the hard work and
self-discipline a social worker employs in achieving a goal. The social work faculty feels that the
“process” is as significant as the “outcome”. When one student assists another by sharing
projects, term papers, book reports, reaction papers and other assignments, the benefit of the
“process” are usurped. The student who recycles the assignments is denied the opportunity to
enhance his/her self-discipline and work habits. Simply stated, Don’t share your work with other
students. The social work faculty considers such behavior as cheating a violation of the NASW
Code of Ethics, a violation of the Student Honor Code.

Plagiarism
Two types of students plagiarize 1) Students who do not know the meaning of plagiarism, and 2)
Students who cheat. The Social Work Program cannot permit with type of student to continue in
the program. As a result of successfully completing CMA 105 and CMA 106, students are
expected to understand the meaning of plagiarism and to use the APA citation style. All students
enrolled in SWK courses are required to use the APA citation style. Since APA style is not taught in
CMA 105-106, students are encouraged to purchase the APA Manual or visit the writing center. Anyone caught plagiarizing or not using APA will automatically receive an F.
APA manuals can be purchased in the bookstore. There is a copy on closed reserve in the
library.

Students with Disabilities
Students with disabilities who believe they require reasonable accommodations in order to meet
the requirements of the course should discuss this situation with the instructor as early in the
semester as possible.

Other Information

Legalities
Eating is not appropriate in the classroom. The use of tobacco products in class is prohibited. Students must turn off all electronic devises
(personal stereos, telephones, pagers, etc.) when class begin. Recording devices (tape recorders, etc.) are not allowed, except under special
circumstances approved by the professor. Confinements of space, materials, etc., family member and guest SHOULD NOT accompany the students to
class, except in special circumstances approved by the professor. In general, children are not appropriate for the classroom.

Updated January 11, 2002 | frederick.stephen@uncp.edu | Copyright © 2002 The University of North Carolina at Pembroke