SOC 1020 Introduction to Sociology, Spring 2014

 

Professor: Stephen M. Marson, Ph.D.
Office: D. F. Sampson 217;  Phone: 521-6475 Inclement weather: (910) 521-6888
Office Hours:
 11:00 Monday, 5:00 Tuesday (RCC), 3:15 Thursday, 4:30 Wednesdays, 11:00 Fridays  for tutoring only
   * Wednesday office hours will be in room 15 of the Thomas Family Center for Entrepreneurship .

Course Prerequisite: None


Table of Contents
Academic Honor Code Course Description Final Exam Religion Statement
Assignments General Education Statement Grading  Required Texts
Attendance Course Learning Objectives (Competencies) How I grade papers References
Blackboard Course Outline and Reading Assignments Late Assignments Sleeping in Class
Cell Phone Policy Disability Statement Plagiarism Tests on Blackboard
Computer Usage Dropping the Course Procedures Tutoring  Madeleine (SI Tutor)

Important Dates for Book Report: Due Date February 27 (4 PM); Late paper will be dropped a letter grade on Starting February 28

No papers will be accepted on February 28 noon.

 

Course Description and General Education Statement:

An introduction to scientific study of human society and social behavior.

Introduction to Sociology seeks to expose students to the basic concepts, perspectives and research findings of sociology. Accordingly, students will be made aware of the important relationships and inter-relationships of the individual to society and culture, as well as the many ways individuals and their values are influenced by society. This course contributes to an understanding of the scientific method, which will enable students to critically evaluate information and materials, as well as apply scientific knowledge to the solution of contemporary social problems.

 

Course Objectives and Topical Headings

WHAT IS THE “SOCIOLOGICAL IMAGINATION”?

·         Learn what sociology covers as a field and how everyday topics like love and romance are shaped by social and historical forces

·         Recognize that sociology is more than just acquiring knowledge; it also involves developing a sociological imagination and a global perspective and understanding social change

·         Understand the importance of social context and social structure to the study of sociology, as well as their importance in understanding our everyday lives

WHAT THEORIES DO SOCIOLOGISTS USE?

·         Learn about the development of sociology as a field

·         Understand the role theory plays in sociological research

·         Name some of the leading social theorists and the concepts they contributed to sociology

·         Learn the different theoretical approaches modern sociologists bring to the field

·         Understand the difference between theoretical approaches and theories

·         Learn the two major levels of analysis and the ways they are connected

WHAT KINDS OF QUESTIONS CAN SOCIOLOGISTS ANSWER?

·         Describe the different types of questions sociologists address in their research—factual, theoretical, comparative, and developmental

·         Learn the reasons why sociology is considered to be a science

WHAT ARE THE SEVEN STEPS OF THE RESEARCH PROCESS?

·         Learn the steps of the research process and be able to complete the process yourself

WHAT RESEARCH METHODS DO SOCIOLOGISTS USE?

·         Familiarize yourself with the methods available to sociological researchers and know the advantages and disadvantages of each

·         See how researchers use multiple methods in a real study

·         Learn why it is important to use triangulation in social research

WHAT ETHICAL DILEMMAS DO SOCIOLOGISTS FACE?

·         Recognize the ethical problems researchers may face and possible solutions to these dilemmas

·         Learn some of the basic statistical terms used in sociological research

HOW DOES THE “SOCIOLOGICAL IMAGINATION” AFFECT YOUR LIFE?

·         Understand how adopting a sociological perspective allows us to develop a richer understanding of ourselves, our significant others, and the world

·         Learn the skills and perspectives that sociologists bring to their work

WHAT IS CULTURE?

HOW DOES HUMAN CULTURE DEVELOP?

WHAT HAPPENED TO PREMODERN SOCIETIES?

HOW HAS INDUSTRIALIZATION SHAPED MODERN SOCIETY?

HOW DOES GLOBALIZATION AFFECT CONTEMPORARY CULTURE?

HOW ARE CHILDREN SOCIALIZED?

WHAT ARE THE FIVE MAJOR STAGES OF THE LIFE COURSE?

HOW DO PEOPLE AGE?

WHAT ARE THE CHALLENGES OF AGING IN THE UNITED STATES?

WHAT IS SOCIAL INTERACTION?

HOW DO WE MANAGE IMPRESSIONS IN DAILY LIFE?

WHAT RULES GUIDE HOW WE COMMUNICATE WITH OTHERS?

HOW DO TIME AND SPACE AFFECT OUR INTERACTIONS?

HOW DO THE RULES OF SOCIAL INTERACTION AFFECT YOUR LIFE?

WHAT ARE SOCIAL GROUPS?

HOW DO WE BENEFIT FROM SOCIAL NETWORKS?

HOW DO ORGANIZATIONS FUNCTION?

IS BUREAUCRACY AN OUTDATED MODEL?

HOW DO GROUPS AND ORGANIZATIONS AFFECT YOUR LIFE?

WHAT IS DEVIANT BEHAVIOR?

WHY DO PEOPLE COMMIT DEVIANT ACTS?

HOW DO WE DOCUMENT CRIME?

WHOSE LIVES ARE AFFECTED BY CRIME?

HOW CAN CRIME BE REDUCED?

HOW DO CRIME AND DEVIANCE AFFECT YOUR LIFE?

WHAT IS SOCIAL STRATIFICATION?

HOW IS SOCIAL CLASS DEFINED IN THE UNITED STATES?

WHAT ARE THE CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF SOCIAL INEQUALITY IN THE UNITED STATES?

HOW DOES POVERTY AFFECT INDIVIDUALS?

HOW DOES SOCIAL INEQUALITY AFFECT YOUR LIFE?

ARE GENDER DIFFERENCES DUE TO NATURE, NURTURE, OR BOTH?

HOW DO GENDER INEQUALITIES AFFECT SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS?

WHY ARE WOMEN THE TARGET OF VIOLENCE?

HOW DOES SOCIAL THEORY EXPLAIN GENDER INEQUALITY?

WHAT ARE THE GLOBAL CONSEQUENCES OF GENDER INEQUALITY?

WHAT ARE RACE AND ETHNICITY?

HOW DO ETHNIC GROUPS COEXIST AND COMPETE?

WHY DO ETHNIC GROUPS MIGRATE?

HOW DO ETHNIC MINORITIES EXPERIENCE LIFE IN THE UNITED STATES?

HOW DOES RACIAL AND ETHNIC INEQUALITY AFFECT YOUR LIFE?

HOW DO SOCIOLOGICAL THEORIES CHARACTERIZE FAMILIES?

HOW HAVE FAMILIES CHANGED OVER TIME?

WHAT DO MARRIAGE AND FAMILY IN THE UNITED STATES LOOK LIKE TODAY?

WHY DOES FAMILY VIOLENCE HAPPEN?

HOW DO NEW FAMILY FORMS AFFECT YOUR LIFE?

WHY ARE EDUCATION AND LITERACY SO IMPORTANT?

WHAT IS THE LINKAGE BETWEEN EDUCATION AND INEQUALITY?

HOW DO SOCIOLOGISTS THINK ABOUT RELIGION?

HOW DOES RELIGION AFFECT LIFE THROUGHOUT THE WORLD?

HOW DOES RELIGION AFFECT YOUR LIFE IN THE UNITED STATES?

HOW DID THE STATE DEVELOP?

HOW DO DEMOCRACIES FUNCTION?

WHAT IS TERRORISM?

WHAT IS THE SOCIAL SIGNIFICANCE OF WORK?

WHAT ARE KEY ELEMENTS OF THE MODERN ECONOMY?

HOW DOES WORK AFFECT EVERYDAY LIFE TODAY?

HOW DOES SOCIAL CONTEXT AFFECT THE HUMAN BODY?

HOW DO SOCIOLOGISTS UNDERSTAND HEALTH AND ILLNESS?

HOW DO SOCIAL FACTORS AFFECT HEALTH AND ILLNESS?

WHAT CAUSES INFECTIOUS DISEASES IN DEVELOPING NATIONS?

HOW DOES SOCIAL CONTEXT SHAPE HUMAN SEXUAL BEHAVIOR?

 

dentify major social changes and social issues in contemporary society, and examine social policies that include the various ways that sociological research and theory can be applied to addressing social issues (Unit 5).

 

Course Outline and Reading Assignments:

Date Topic Requirements
Week 1 Theory and Method
Social Solidarity (doc)
The Development of Sociological Theory
     Chapter 1 Powerpoint
Chapter 1
Week  2 Culture and Society
     Read:
Body Ritual among the Nacirema (html)
Examples: McDonalds; Japan

We all wear a uniform
Basic Definitions
Chapter 2
Week  3 Socialization, the Life Course and Aging 
Start the discussion of the chapter with the Harry Potter Controversy

    Summary notes for Childhood and Society (html)
    Disengagement Theory (html)

     Activities Theory (html)

The Story of Clayton Bigsby
Social Interaction and Social Structure
The
Tools of Sociological Research

Statistics in Sociology 
Chapter 3

QUIZ
Week  4

Social Interaction

Impression Management 1; Impression Management 2

Online Crisis

Chapter 4
Week  5 Groups Networks and Organizations

      Sociological Types and Definitions of Groups (doc)

      Georg Simmel

      Expressive & Instrumental Needs

Chapter 5

Week  6 Conformity, Deviance and Crime
     Durkheim's Vision of Suicide

     Psychological Vision of Depression
Chapter 6
QUIZ ( mid term)
Week  7 Social Class and Social Stratification
      Symbols in Social Class
Check out:
Barratt Simplified Measure of Social Status (jpg)
     Occupational Prestige Scale (NORC) (html)
     A Marxist Vision of Social Class (html)
     Key Definitions for Social Class (html)
     Status Attainment v. Marx (html)
Chapter 7
Week  8 Gender  
      Masculinity and Femininity
      Types of Feminism

      Westboro Baptist Church (WBC) html
      The Story of Agnes
 
Chapter 9
Week  9 Race and Ethnicity
      Elizabeth and Hazel
      American Anthropological Association
Chapter 10
QUIZ
Week  10 Families and Religion
      Family Jargon
      Family types and the Mode of Production
      Psychology using Sociology for marriage counseling (pdf)
Chapter 11
Week  11 Education and Religion
      Teachers deviating from the curve
           Ron Clark
           Erin Gruwell
      Sociological Definition of Religion

      Social Class and Religion
Chapter 12
Week  12 Politics and the Economy Chapter 13
Week  13 Health and Sexuality
      Super Size Me
      Functionalism (html)
      The Continuum (bmp)
Chapter 14
Week  14 Population, Urbanization and the Environment Chapter 15
Week  15 Social Change and Social Movements Chapter 16
Week  16 Final Exam
     

Final Exam: Go to http://www2.uncp.edu/registrar/calendars/exam_2014.html HOWEVER, this is NOT accurate for all classes.

The 9:30 Tuesday and Thursday class will meet for their final on Wednesday May 7 in HSCI 258 starting 4:30 and ending at 6:45

The 2:00 Tuesday and Thursday class will meet for their final on Tuesday May 6 in SAMP 136 starting at 1:30 and ending at 4:00

EXCEPT for DSS students.   These students will take their final exam at the computer facilities near the DSS Office. For the final exam, student are NOT permitted to have cell phones or other material such as books, book bags or purses. 

Procedures:  Lectures and class discussion, role-playing games and related active learning class activities, occasional audio-visuals and guest speakers.

 

Grading/Assessment:

1) Two to Three Quizzes -- 20%; 2) Final Exam -- 40%; 3) Book Report 35% 4) Class Attendance 5%    Grades are not negotiated. A grade will not be changed after the grade is given to the student.  In addition, since UNCP adopted pluses and minuses within the grading protocol, grades are NOT rounded.  Thus, if a student earns a grade of 73.999, that is valued as a C-.  On the other hand, if the professor makes a calculation error, students are expected to immediately report the error to the professor.
A 92-100
B 83-86
C 73-76
D 63-66
A- 90-91
B- 80-82
C- 70-73
D- 60-62
B+ 87-89
C+ 77-79
D+ 67-69
F 0-59

Book Report Due: 

Dates for Book Report: Due Date February 27 (4 PM); Late paper will be dropped a letter grade on Starting February 28.  No papers will be accepted on February 28 noon.   All students are required to save their book report on the I drive.  Get in the habit of saving all your course material on the I drive.

 

Attendance Policy:  There are no excused absences.  Students are therefore encouraged to be mindful of absences and make every effort to be in attendance. Students are expected to have read assigned material prior to the class. Students are also expected to participate in class discussion, exercises and any Blackboard discussions that may be announced.  Students are considered in attendance only if present for the entire class. Arriving late or leaving early is disruptive will be dealt with by the instructor.  Attendance will be used as a criterion in determining the final grade.  (Present 1 point; Tardy 1/2 point; Not present 0 points)  For more details see “Class Attendance” in The University of North Carolina at Pembroke Student Handbook.

 

Disability Statement:
Federal laws require UNCP to accommodate students with documented learning, physical, chronic health, psychological, visual or hearing disabilities. In post-secondary school settings, academic accommodations are not automatic; to receive accommodations, students must make a formal request and must supply documentation from a qualified professional to support that request. Students who believe they qualify must contact Disability Support Services (DSS) in DF Lowry Building, Room 107 or call 910-521-6695 to begin the accommodation process. All discussions remain confidential.  Accommodations cannot be provided retroactively. More information for students about the services provided by DSS and the accommodation process may be found at the following links:  http://www.uncp.edu/dss/
http://www.uncp.edu/dss/students/procedures_for_accessing_services.htm

Religion Statement:

The University of North Carolina at Pembroke has a legal and moral obligation to accommodate all students who must be absent from classes or miss scheduled exams in order to observe religious holidays; we must be careful not to inhibit or penalize these students for exercising their rights to religious observance. To accommodate students’ religious holidays, each student will be allowed two excused absences each semester with the following conditions:

1. Students, who submit written notification to their instructors within two weeks of the beginning of the semester, shall be excused from class or other scheduled academic activity to observe a religious holy day of their faith. Excused absences are limited to two class sessions (days) per semester.

2. Students shall be permitted a reasonable amount of time to make up tests or other work missed due to an excused absence for a religious observance.

3. Students should not be penalized due to absence from class or other scheduled academic activity because of religious observances.

A student who is to be excused from class for a religious observance is not required to provide a second-party certification of the reason for the absence.   Furthermore, a student who believes that he or she has been unreasonably denied an education benefit due to religious beliefs or practices may seek redress through the student grievance procedure. 

 

Dropping SOC 1020

Some students find it necessary to drop a course.   This is NOT a problem and students will NOT hurt the feelings of the professor.  If a student attends some classes at the beginning of the semester but fails to complete the drop form, the student will receive an F for the course.   The computer will NOT permit the professor to give a W.   To avoid this problem, talk to the professor even if the "last day to drop" has passt.   If students feel uncomfortable speaking to the professor, get a drop slip and have the department chair or the Registrar sign the form.

 

Required Texts: 

Giddens; Duneier; Appelbaum & Carr (2013). Essentials of Sociology. 4th edition. Norton.

Cladwell, Malcolm (2002). The Tipping Point

 

About Computer Usage: Students are required to have an email account to submit and receive assignments. All students receive an email account from the university at the point of application. Student email addresses are all of the form that ends in @bravemail.uncp.edu. It is the student’s responsibility to check his or her university supplied email account in order to stay current with university communications. Following admission, his or her UNCP email account will be closed after the first regular semester in which he or she is not enrolled. Students are encouraged to store and backup all their assignments on the space of the server that is allocated to them. By following directions found at http://www.uncp.edu/doit/help/remote_access.html (download Fillzilla), students can save and upback all their material from any location off campus. All students are required to save their book report on the I drive.


Assignments
This course requires 2 to 3 quizzes, a final exam and a book report of The Tipping Point.   The required outline for the book report can be found at the hot link as for the process of grading. Avoid submitting a late assignment. For students who have never written a book report, go to http://homeworktips.about.com/od/writingabookreport/a/report.htm for help.   Due October 8.  Late papers will be dropped a letter grade on October 9.  No papers will be accepted on October 10.  All students are required to save their book report on the I drive.
 
Cell Phone Policy: Students are not permitted to conduct phone conversations during class time.  Students are not permitted to have cell ring during class time.   Students who use conduct a phone conversation or allow their phones to ring during class time will be drop 10 points on the next quiz or 5 points for their final exam.

Plagiarism and the Academic Honor Code
The Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice does not permit plagiarism and complies with all standards articulated in the Academic Honor Code.     Plagiarism constitutes projecting the an image that someone else's idea is your idea OR someone else's words are your words. You may also get help from University Writing Center hours during the spring semester are from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. on Friday. For an appointment, stop by the Writing Center, Dial 131, call 910.521.6168, or email writing@uncp.edu.

Blackboard Usage:  Explorer version 8 does not function well with Blackboard.  As a result, the computer staff recommend that student use Firefox .  If you do not have these browsers on your desktop, download them now.   Both browsers are free and the hotlinks are provided on this syllabus.  Although SOC 1020 is not designated as a “Blackboard” course, Blackboard is used under two circumstances.   First, if the course is canceled or the professor is unable to attend class and cannot find a replacement, lectures and assignments will be posted on Blackboard.  Second, depending on the nature of the course, some quizzes will be posted on Blackboard.   Under most circumstances, students will be given a three day window of opportunity to compete the quiz.  If a student is kicked off Blackboard during a quiz, he/she is required to immediately email (steve.marson@uncp.edu or smarson@nc.rr.com) or call the instructor (521-6475). All students are required to completed the Blackboard Orientation.

Office of Academic Excellence

Tutoring is available by subject with peer tutors who show proficiency in courses and have been trained in effective tutoring strategies.  The tutoring sessions can host up to five students per session.  To get the most effective results students should sign up for tutoring as soon as possible.  Students should also come to tutoring sessions with specific questions prepared regarding course material.  The more consistent the attendance to tutoring sessions, the better students will understand the material and perform at a higher level in class.  Sign up for tutoring in the Center for Academic Excellence office.

 Supplemental Instruction (SI) is available to assigned classes that present historically difficult material.  An SI Leader is an upperclassman, model student who has taken the course and shown proficiency, and has been trained in effective Supplemental Instruction leadership strategies.  An SI Leader is assigned to the course to attend all lecture sessions and host at least three study sessions per week for students to attend voluntarily.  SI sessions will provide supplemental material for students to use to improve their understanding of the course material.  SI sessions also provide an opportunity for students to ask questions, and gain insight from their classmates.  Students are encouraged to attend as frequently as possible to review the class material consistently.  The more frequent the attendance at SI Sessions, the better students will understand the material and perform in class.

 The Resource Learning Lab offers computer based, self-paced tutoring in basic writing skills from composing sentences, paragraphs, and essays, to addressing common writing problems, basic reading comprehension, and word problem dissection.  These programs are 4 – 8 weeks long and offer non-credit, collectable test performance data on each student during their progression through our programs. The Resource Learning Lab also offers tutoring that improves academic study skills through self-help DVD’s, such as Values and Goals, Time Management, Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving, Active Listening and Note-Taking, Researching, Reading and Writing, and Studying and Test-Taking.  These programs are designed to enhance college-level reading comprehension and writing skills, and to improve the areas where students find they have deficiencies.  The Resource Learning Lab is available to all students, whether right out of high school or non-traditional students needing a refresher.


Sleeping in Class During the academic year 2012-13, a large number of freshman and sophomore students were found sleeping during class. Other students complained.   Therefore any student who falls asleep during class will be asked to leave.   In addition, he/she will be marked as absent and will be report to the Office of Student Affairs for a second offense.

References used in this course:
  • Colapinto, J. (2000). As Nature Made Him: The Boy who was Raised as a Girl. NY: Harper/Collins.
  • Cooley, C. H. (1902). Human Nature and the Social Order. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction.
  • Durkheim, E. (1897). Suicide: A Study of Sociology. NY: Free Press.
  • Durkheim, E. (1895). Rules of the Sociological Method. NY: Free Press.
  • Erikson, E. (1950). Childhood and Society. NY: WW Norton.
  • Evans, W. M. (2009). Open Wound: The Long View of Race in American. Chicago: University of Illinois.
  • Freud, S. (1917). Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis. NY: WW Norton.
  • Gagnon, J.H. & Simon, W. (1973). Sexual Conduct: The Social Sources of Human Sexuality. Chicago: Aldine.
  • Garfinkel, H. (1967). Studies in Ethnomethodology. Englewood, NJ: Prentice Hall.
  • Homans, G. C. (1961). Social Behavior: Its Elementary Forms. NY: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.
  • Hunt, J. (1863). On the Negro's Place in Nature. Lndon: Trubner & Company.
  • Maier, T. (2009). Masters of Sex. NY Basic Books.
  • Marx, K. & Engels, F. (1887). Capital. NY: New World.
  • Mead, G,H. (1937). On Social Psychology. Chicago: University of Chicago Press,
  • Parsons, T. (1951). The Social System. NY: Free Press.
  • Samaras, T.T. (2009). Human Body Size and the Laws of Scaling. Hauppauge, NY: Nova Science Publishers.
  • Smith, A. (1776). An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations. Amherst, NY: Prometheus.
  • Steele, S. (1990). The Content of Our Character: A New Vision of Race in America.  NY: Harper/Collins.
  • Suskind, R. (1998). Hope in the Unseen. NY: Broadway Books.
  • Veblen, T. (1899). The Theory of the Leisure Class. NY: Mentor.
  • Warren, E.W. (1864). Southern Slavery and the Bible. Macon, GA: Burke, Boykin & Company.
  • Weber, M. (1904). The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism. NY: Charles Scribner's Sons.