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Dr. Jesse Peters
PO Box 1510
Pembroke, NC 28372

Phone: 910.521.6635
Fax:
910.521.6606
Email:
peters@uncp.edu

Location: Dial 260 A
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curriculum vitae

Darrell Jesse Peters
Professor of English and American Indian Studies
University of North Carolina at Pembroke 
English Department
Pembroke, NC 28372
Email: peters@uncp.edu
Phone: 910.521.6635

Education | Honors and Awards | Administrative Experience | Teaching Experience | Publications | Conference Presentations | Service

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EDUCATION

Ph. D. University of New Mexico, December 1999
Dissertation Director: Professor Louis Owens

Dissertation: “Only the Drum Is Confident”: Simulations and Syncretisms in Native American Fiction

As Gerald Vizenor has pointed out, “the English language has been the linear tongue of colonial discoveries, racial cruelties, invented names, the simulation of tribal cultures. . . . At the same time, this mother tongue of paracolonialism has been a language of invincible imagination and liberation for many tribal people in the postindian world.” Following Vizenor’s lead and drawing on the theories of Louis Owens, Umberto Eco and Jean Baudrillard, I explore the ways in which Native American authors have used, and continue to use, literature as a method of liberating themselves from the roles and stereotypes that have been prescribed for them. That is, I examine instances where Native American authors struggle to construct subjective identities and cultural representations within the masks of dominant culture, paying close attention to the strategies they choose as they undertake this task. It seems that some of these texts, such as those  by Sherman Alexi, often draw upon the strategy of constructing a kind of “Indian” essentialism that, ironically, plays into the hands of the dominant discourse by propagating what Eco and Baudrillard define as the hyperreal or the simulation. However, other Native American novels, such as those by A.A. Carr,  rely more on a positively syncretic strategy which works to acknowledge the fact that Native American people live and function in a complex world, one that demands a negotiation between cultural experiences and belief systems. In the midst of these two quite distinct strategies found within Native American literature,  radically different conceptions and representations of Native American identity can be found, and ultimately I argue that writers who reject essentialist impulses in their fiction may be more successful at deconstructing stereotypes than those who attempt to construct separatist “Indian” worlds.

Examination Areas:
Native American Literature, Language and Rhetoric (Focus on Composition Theory), Modern Literature
 
M.A. University of New Mexico, June 1994

Examination Areas:
Twentieth Century British and American Literature, Literary Criticism, Nineteenth Century American Literature, Eighteenth Century British Literature

B.A. Emory University, May 1992, Magna Cum Laude

 Major: English
 Minor: Sociology
 Honors Thesis: “Forever to Come”: N. Scott Momaday’s Bear Identity
 Thesis Director: Sally Wolff King

A.A. Oxford College of Emory University, May 1990

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HONORS AND AWARDS

Winner $10,000 UNCP grant to extend the Literacy Commons project, 2012. (with Hicks, Marquard, and Decker)

Winner $10,000 UNCP grant for a digital repository for American Indian Studies documents, 2011. (with Jacobs, Locklear, and Oxendine)

Dirt Roads and Towns, Finalist, LongLeaf Press Chapbook Competition, 2009

Wye Fellow, Wye Faculty Seminar (Aspen Institute), 2006

Award for Outstanding Teaching at UNCP, 2003

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ADMINISTRATIVE EXPERIENCE

Chair, Faculty Senate Academic Affairs Committee 2012-2013

Dean, Maynor Honors College 2005-2011

Director, Center for Undergraduate Research 2005-2011

Chair, Faculty Senate and General Faculty 2004-2005

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TEACHING EXPERIENCE

Professor of English, University of North Carolina at Pembroke 2009-present

Associate Professor of English, University of North Carolina at Pembroke 2005-2009

Assistant Professor of English, University of North Carolina at Pembroke 1999-2005

Teaching Assistant, University of New Mexico 1994-1999

Courses Taught

Freshman Seminar
This course is designed to aid freshmen as the orient themselves to the challenges and rewards of pursuing a college degree.

Cultures In Contact
This course is designed to introduce students to a specific world culture through a variety of methods. The readings include sociological, economic, historical, and fictional accounts of this country. The objective is to learn about another culture while also learning how to approach the study of and engagement with that culture. There is also a travel component to provide for first-hand engagement with the culture studied.

Native American Poetry
This course is designed to expose students to poetry produced by Native American authors. Native American poetry grows from centuries of oral traditions including songs, stories, and ceremonies. There are numerous Indian poets writing today from many different tribal communities – urban, rural, reservation, and non-reservation, and this poetry has much to offer in both form and content.

Native American Literature
This is my area of specialty, and in this course I expose students to a variety of voices from within the canon of Native American literature. I also believe it is important for students to gain at least some knowledge of the theory surrounding marginalized literature so that they better understand the difficulties faced by Native American authors.

Native American Novel
This course is designed to expose students to novels produced by Native American authors. The discussion centers around attempting to understand what the writers have to tell us and why. We pay particular attention to the ways in which Indian authors write within, outside of, and against the dominant canon of literature. Some of the questions we will be asking are: Who is an Indian? What is Native American literature? How does Indian literature relate to American literature in general? How is the Native American novel different from other novels, if at all? What role does the oral tradition play within these written texts?

Multicultural Literature
The goal of this course is to expose students to traditionally ignored or overlooked works of literature. I also want students to understand the value of difference and the important idea that inclusion is often better then exclusion.

The Oral Tradition in Native American Literature
This seminar explores how contemporary authors use strategies and concepts from the oral tradition in their written work.

The Multicultural American Experience
In this Honors seminar, I used a variety of texts, both historical and literary, to examine how the nation and concept of America has been and continues to be shaped by multiculturalism.

Survey of American Literature
This traditional survey course serves as an introduction to American literature and covers texts beginning with the colonial period and extending through the present. I have also taught this course online.

William Faulkner and Eudora Welty
This senior-level seminar covered works by both Faulkner and Welty, paying close attention to the similarities and differences in both content and style.

Southern Literature
The course is a survey of southern literature (non-fiction, short fiction, poetry, drama, and the novel) from its beginnings through the present.

Modern Fiction
Through a survey of Modern fiction, we attempt to understand the Modernist aesthetic and how it manifests itself in literature. We also pay attention to how postmodernism is anticipated by many of the Modern writers.

Introduction to Literature
The course centers around providing students with the tools and strategies with which to interpret and discuss literature written in all genres. I also try to foster an appreciation for the links between the study of literature and other areas of study.

Creative Writing (fiction and poetry)
This course is designed to introduce students to strategies and methods for writing creatively. I want students to see how form and content work together to create meaning as they explore their individual talents in both poetry and fiction.

Written Communication Skills
This class situates students in the academy and offers them tools for navigating texts. Students cultivate reading and writing strategies in order to understand, paraphrase, and summarize texts.

Composition I: Exposition
This class introduces students to college level writing and provides them with the skills necessary to produce a clearly organized and well-supported written argument.

Composition I: Exposition (ESL)
This course is the same as the one above except it is designed for speakers of English as a second language.

Composition II: Analysis and Argumentation
This course builds upon the work students did in 101 and helps them refine their writing through an emphasis on research, evidence, structure, tone, and style.

Composition II: Analysis and Argumentation (ESL)
This course is the same as the one above except it is designed for speakers of English as a second language.

Composition II: Analysis and Argumentation (Computer Assisted Classroom)
This class used computer-assisted technologies to supplement the teaching of composition. The use of computers aided students in collaborative brainstorming, drafting, discussing, and revising, activities which proved to be invaluable in the writing process.

Advanced Expository Writing
Students who wish to further practice and develop their composition skills beyond English Composition II are encouraged to take this course. Much of the class focuses on understanding and developing style.

Additional Teaching Experience

Tutor, Writing Lab, Center for Academic Program Support, University of New Mexico, 1994-1996

I was responsible for daily tutoring sessions which included working with ESL and Learning Disabled students as well as for planning and leading various writing-oriented workshops.

Substitute English Teacher, Albuquerque Public School System, 1993-1994

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PUBLICATIONS

Criticism

Book Review of Reconstructing the Native South: American Indian Literature and the Lost Cause. By Melanie Benson Taylor. Forthcoming in the Journal of Southern History. August 2013 (Volume LXXIX, No. 3)

"Everything the World Turns On": Inclusion and Exclusion in Linda Hogan’s Power. Forthcoming in American Indian Quarterly. May 2013 (Vol. 37, No. 1/2)

“Implementing Honors Faculty Status: An Adventure in University Politics.” Honors in Practice. Vol. 5, 2009.

Faculty Discipline Editor (Humanities), Explorations, the Journal of Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities for the State of North Carolina. 2006-present.

Guest Editor, Pembroke Magazine. Number Thirty-Eight, 2006. Special Issue on Native American Literature.

"Rivers and Shadows." Pembroke Magazine. Number Thirty-Eight, 2006.

Book Review of Toward a Native American Critical Theory. The American Indian Quarterly 29.1&2 (2005) 337-339.

“’You Got to Fish Ever Goddam Day’: The Importance of Hunting and Fishing through Louis Owens’ I Hear the Train.” Louis Owens: Literary Reflections on His Life and Work, University of Oklahoma Press. 2004.

Co-Founder & Co-Editor, ReVisions: Best Student Essays of the University of North Carolina at Pembroke. 2000-2003.

"'A Multitude of Routes, Roads and Paths': Transcultural Healing in A.A. Carr's Eye Killers." Paradoxa Number 15. Summer 2001.

Book Review of Mixedblood Messages: Literature, Film, Family, Place. The Newsletter of the Association for General and Liberal Studies. Volume 16:2. Winter 2000.

“Writing for a Change.” La Puerta. Ed. Susan Cannata et al. Dubuque, Iowa: Kendall Hunt Publishing Company, 1999.

“Beyond the Frame: Tom King’s Narratives of Resistment.” Studies in American Indian Literature. Volume 11:2. Summer 1999.

“Diving Home: Centering in Louis Owens’ Wolfsong.” American Indian Quarterly. Volume 21:3. Spring 1997

Current Critical Projects

"Only the Drum is Confident": Simulations and Syncretisms in Native American Fiction.

“Remember the Last Voice: Motion and Narrative Flux in Gordon Henry’s The Light People.”

“'He Would Have Killed Everybody': Jessard Deal’s View of the World.”

Poetry

"If You Still Like Hank." Deep South Magazine. http://www.deepsouthmag.com/?page_id=1020 April, 2011

“Even Cowboys,” “Remedy,” “Stones.” Pembroke Magazine. Number Thirty-Six, 2004.

"August 13, 1962," "Caves," "Rabbit Hunt." Pembroke Magazine. Number Thirty-Four, 2002.

"Hold," "Biscuit Maker." Pembroke Magazine. Number Thirty-Three, 2001.

“Ashes.” The Denver Quarterly. Spring 1996

“Cornbread,” “Can I Start You Out With Something to Drink?,” “Rainshadows,” “Speechless.” Selected Proceedings of the Seventh Annual Southwest Symposium. Spring 1995

“Hands, Dust, and Clay.” Zone 3. Fall/Winter 1995

“January Road.” The Lullwater Review. Spring 1992

Creative Nonfiction

"Riding as Art." BMW Owners News. March, 2011

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CONFERENCES

Presentations

"Rivers and Shadows: Indigenous Knowledge in the Work of Louis Owens ." Native American Literature Symposium, Minneapolis, MN, March 2013.

“Experiential Learning in Honors” Best Honors Administrative Practices Workshop, with Dr. Bernice Braid (Long Island University), Dr. Alix Fink (Longwood University), and Dr. Sara Quay (Endicott College), NCHC Conference, Boston, MA, October 2012.

"Shaping Honors Curriculum to Increase Diversity" with Dr. Susan Cannata (UNCP), NCHC Conference, Boston, MA, October 2012.

"What Am I Doing in France: Migration and Transformation in Aaron Carr's Unpublished Novel, Pleiades Man." Native American Literature Symposium, Albuquerque, NM, March 2012.

“Green Chili and Cornbread: Teaching Native Poetry Out There Somewhere” with Dr. Jane Haladay, SAMLA Conference, Atlanta, GA, November 2011.

“Creative Paths to Honors Student Engagement” Best Honors Administrative Practices Panel with Dr. Joan Digbee (Long Island University), NCHC Conference, Phoenix, AZ, October 2011.

“Undergraduate Scholarship at UNCP: Engaging Students Through Faculty Mentored Experiences” with Dr. Lee Phillips, Teaching and Learning Center Workshop, UNCP, Pembroke, NC, March 2011.

"Crow and the Cultural Commons: Affiliation and Adjacent Possibility in Anishinaabe Literature" with Dr. Jane Haladay (UNCP), Dr. Molly McGlennen (Vassar), Dr. Kim Blaeser (Wisconsin-Milwaukee), and Dr. Gordon Henry (Michigan State) Native American Literature Symposium, Albuquerque, NM, March 2011.

"ASAIL Pedagogy Committee Sponsored Panel on Teaching Southeastern Indian Literatures" with Dr. Ellen Arnold (East Carolina), Dr. Melanie Benson (Dartmouth), and Dr. Mae Claxton (Western Carolina), Native American Literature Symposium, Albuquerque, NM, March 2011.

"Innovations in Honors Theses: Overcoming Obstacles." Developing In Honors Panel, NCHC Conference, Kansas City, MO, October 2010.

"We Have the Numbers, But Are We Diverse?" NCHC Conference, Kansas City, MO, October 2010.

"Exploring Issues in Honors: Student Recruitment and Success." With Dr. Jennifer Bonds-Raacke, NCHC Conference, Kansas City, MO, October 2010.

"No Wasted Seasons: A Conversation on the Poetics of Gordon Henry" with Dr. Jane Haladay (UNCP), Dr. Molly McGlennen (Vassar), Dr. Kim Blaeser (Wisconsin-Milwaukee), and Dr. Gordon Henry (Michigan State) Native American Literature Symposium, Albuquerque, NM, March 2010.

"Living and Learning: The Importance of Community in Successful Honors Programs." with Dr. Leslie Heaphy (Kent State Stark), NCHC Conference, Washington, DC, November 2009.

"Examining Retention Rates and Years to Graduation of Honors Students." with Dr. Jenn Bonds-Raacke, NCHC Conference, Washington, DC, November 2009.

"Protecting Our Programs from External Demands." Developing In Honors Panel, NCHC Conference, Washington, DC, November 2009.

"Working Together: The Benefits of Team Teaching at UNCP" with Dr. Jane Haladay, Faculty Development Day Workshop, UNCP, Pembroke, NC, August 2009.

"Learning Together: the Benefits of Undergraduate Research at UNCP" with Dr. Jenn Bonds-Raacke, Teaching and Learning Center Workshop, UNCP, Pembroke, NC, March 2009.

"Working Together: The Benefits of Team Teaching at UNCP" with Dr. Scott Hicks and Dr. Jane Haladay, Teaching and Learning Center Workshop, UNCP, Pembroke, NC, March 2009.

"Radical Administration, Not an Oxymoron: One College Dean Talking." Convention of the Conference on College Composition and Communication, San Francisco, CA, March 2009.

"Tortillas and Cornbread: The Power of Being in Place When Teaching Native Literatures." with Dr. Jane Haladay. Southwest Texas PCA/ACA Convention, Albuquerque, NM, February 2009.

"Cultures in Contact: How to Blend Academic Study and International Travel in Honors." NCHC Conference, San Antonio, TX, November 2008.

"Motivating Honors Students in the Classroom." Developing In Honors Panel, NCHC Conference, San Antonio, TX, November 2008.

“Best Practices: Diversity in Honors Colleges and Programs.” With Dr. Jenn Bonds-Raacke. NC Honors Conference, Raleigh, NC, September 2008.

“Remember the Last Voice: Motion and Narrative Flux in Gordon Henry’s The Light People.” Multi-Ethnic Studies of Europe and the Americas Conference, Leiden, The Netherlands, June 2008.

“Remember the Last Voice: Motion and Narrative Flux in Gordon Henry’s The Light People.”Southwest Texas PCA/ACA Convention, Albuquerque, NM, February 2008.

"Implementing Honors Faculty Status." NCHC Conference, Denver, CO, November 2007.

"Honors Faculty Issues." Developing In Honors Panel, NCHC Conference, Denver, CO, November 2007.

“'He Would Have Killed Everybody': Jessard Deal’s View of the World.” MLA Conference, Philadelphia, PA, December, 2004.

Reading of Selected Poetry. SAMLA Poets Panel. SAMLA Conference, Roanoke, VA, November 2004.

“Everything the World Turns On: Inclusion and Exclusion in Linda Hogan’s Power.” SAMLA, Atlanta, GA, November 2003.

"What Happens When I Can't Look'em In the Eye: The Difference between Teaching Literature Online and in a Traditional Classroom." Conference on Teaching With Technology. Greensboro, NC, April 2002.

"Sherman Alexie's Blues: Why Do the Words Sound So Familiar?" American Literature Association Conference, Cambridge, MA, May 2001.

"'A Multitude of Routes, Roads, and Paths': Cross-Cultural Understanding and Healing in A. A. Carr's Eye Killers". Southwest Texas PCA/ACA Convention, Albuquerque, NM, February 2000.

“‘Only the Drum is Confident’: Simulations and Syncretisms in Native American Literature.” Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association Convention, Salt Lake City, UT, October 1998.

“From Their Stories to Ours: Starting with the Student in the Composition Classroom.” Conference on College Composition and Communication, Chicago, IL, April 1998

“Using Sequenced Assignments to Grow Portfolios.” Western States Composition Conference, Tempe, AZ, October 1997

“Diving Home: Centering in Louis Owens’ Wolfsong.” Western Literature Association Conference, Albuquerque, NM, October 1997

“Beyond the Frame: Tom King’s Narratives of Resistment.” American Literature Association Conference, Baltimore, MD, June, 1997

“‘Art Thou Real, My Ideal:’ Joyce’s Artistic Gaze.” The Southwest Symposium, Albuquerque, NM, April 1997

Poetry Reading. The Southwest Symposium, Albuquerque, NM, March 1996

“Beyond the Frame: Tom King’s Narrative of Resistment.” Native American Studies Symposium, Albuquerque, NM, April 1996

“Finding the Postmodern Center: Trickster Discourse in Gerald Vizenor’s Bearheart.” The Southwest Symposium, Albuquerque, NM, March 1995

“Mouth to Mouth: The Narrative Structure of Absalom, Absalom!.” The Southwest Symposium, Albuquerque, NM, March 1993

Participation

Chair, Session V, 8th Annual Southeast Indian Studies Conference, Pembroke, NC, April, 2012.

Chair, Session I, 7th Annual Southeast Indian Studies Conference, Pembroke, NC, April, 2011.

Chair, Session IV, 6th Annual Southeast Indian Studies Conference, Pembroke, NC, April, 2010.

Chair, "Protecting Our Programs from External Demands." Developing In Honors Panel, NCHC Conference, Washington, DC, November 2009.

Chair, Session VII, 5th Annual Southeast Indian Studies Conference, Pembroke, NC, April, 2009.

NCHC Faculty Institute on Experiential Learning, Berlin, Germany, March, 2008.

Session Moderator, NCHC Conference, Denver, CO, November 2007.

Executive Committee, Session on Native American Literature. SAMLA. Atlanta, GA, November, 2007.

AAC&U Conference on General Education Reform. Newport, RI, May 2007.

Southern Regional Honors Conference, Charlotte, NC, March, 2007.

Native American Literature Symposium, Mt. Pleasant, MI, March, 2007.

Academic Chairpersons Conference, Orlando, FL, February, 2007.

Executive Committee, Session on Native American Literature. SAMLA. Charlotte, NC, November, 2006.

National Collegiate Honors Council Conference, Philadelphia, PA, October, 2006.

Chair, Session IV, 2nd Annual Southeast Indian Studies Conference, Pembroke, NC, April, 2006.

National Council on Undergraduate Research Conference, Asheville, NC, March, 2006.

Academic Chairpersons Conference, Orlando, FL, February, 2006.

Chair, Session on Native American Literature. SAMLA. Atlanta, GA, November, 2005.

National Collegiate Honors Council Conference, St. Louis, MO, October, 2005

Secretary, Session on Native American Literature. SAMLA. Roanoke, VA, November, 2004.

Facilitator, Student Poetry Panel. Sigma Tau Delta International Conference. Daytona Beach, FL, March 2004.

Facilitator, Student Panel on American Literature. Sigma Tau Delta International Conference,. Cincinnati, OH, March 2003.

Chair, Roundtable Discussion on the Importance of Native American Studies in the Humanities Curriculum, Humanities Educators of North Carolina Conference, Pembroke, NC October, 2002.

Chair, Session on Robert Morgan. "From Bookmobile to Oprah's Book Club: The Fiction of Robert Morgan." Pembroke, NC, April 2002.

"Conference on Distance Education." Wilmington, NC, April 2002.

Chair, Session on Jill McCorkle. "The Art of Jill McCorkle." Pembroke, NC, April 2001.

"Teaching for the Public Good: The Future of the Humanities in Higher Education." Chapel Hill, NC, September 2000.

Chair, Session on Southern Literature, Philological Association of the Carolinas Conference, Rock Hill, SC, March 2000.

Chair, Session on Native American Literature, Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association Convention, Santa Fe, NM, October 1999.

Textbook Reviews

Review of A Writer's Resource, 2004

Review of Ways of Reading, 2004

Review of Juxtapositions, 2003

Review of Everything's an Argument, 2002

Review of Writing Poetry, 2002

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PROFESSIONAL SERVICE AND COMMITTEES

Facilitator, NCHC Faculty Institute. Yellowstone National Park, June 2013

Manuscript Review for Michigan State University Press, 2012

Facilitator, NCHC Faculty Institute. Albuquerque, NM, July 2011

Peer-Reviewer, AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous
Peoples
, 2009-2010

Discipline Editor/Reader (Humanities) Explorations: NC Journal of Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities, 2006-present

Member, NCHC Committee on Honors Semesters 2009-present

Member, NCHC Committee on Diversity Issues 2008-present

External Reviewer, UMass Dartmouth ENL Department, 2009

UNIVERSITY SERVICE AND COMMITTEES

Member, Faculty Senate Governance Committee 2013-present

Member, Faculty Senate 2012-present

Member, Senate Executive Committee 2012-2013

Chair, Faculty Senate Academic Affairs Committee 2012-2013

Member, Taskforce on Advising 2009-2010

Member, Summer School Taskforce 2007-2008

Teaching and Learning Center Mentor for New Faculty 2007-2008

Member, Strategic Planning and Resource Committee 2006-2011

Chair, Governing Ideas Taskforce 2006-2007

Member, Deans Council 2005-2011

Member, Faculty Athletic Committee 2005-2011

Member, Provost Search Committee 2005

Chair, Faculty Senate and General Faculty 2004-2005

Chair, Campus Appeals Board 2004-2005

Member, Chancellor’s Advisory Committee on Football 2004-2005

Member, Chancellor’s Advisory Committee on Faculty Reassigned Time 2004-2005

Member, Chancellor’s Advisory Committee on School of Optometry 2004-2005

Member, Faculty Senate 2002-2005

Member, Senate Executive Committee 2003-2005

Chair, Senate Committee on Committees and Elections 2003-2004

Member, Arts and Sciences Advisory Committee 2001-2003

Member, UNCP Undergraduate Research Committee 2002-2012

Faculty Advisor, Alpha Chi Honor Society 2003-2011

Member, Student Affairs and Campus Life Committee 2000-2002


DEPARTMENTAL SERVICE AND COMMITTEES

Member, English Committee 2012-present

Member, Peer Review Committee (Decker) 2012-2013

Member, Post Tenure Review Committee (Guynn) 2012-2013

Member, Student Engagement Committee 2011-2012

Chair, Peer Review Committee (Hicks) 2011-2012

Member, Peer Review Committee (Haladay) 2011-2012

Member, Peer Review Committee (Chemishanova) 2010-2011

Member, Peer Review Committee (Marquard) 2010-2011

Member AIS Curriculum Committee 2008-present

Member, Peer Review Committee 2007-2008

Member, AIS Department Chair Search Committee 2005-2007

Member, Peer Review Committee 2006-2007

Member, New Hire Search Committee 2005-2006

Chair, English Awards Committee 2004-2005

Member, English Awards Committee 2003-2005

Member, English Graduate Committee 2002-2004

Member, English Composition Committee 1999-2002

Member, Peer Review Committee 2003-2004

Chair, New Hire search Committee 2002-2003

Member, Peer Review Committee 2002-2003

Chair, New Hire Search Committee 2001-2002

Member, Peer Review Committee 2001-2002

Member, New Hire Search Committee 1999-2001

ETL New Faculty Mentor 2002-2006

Faculty Advisor, Sigma Tau Delta 2000-present

Web Editor, Pembroke Magazine 2002-2010

Professional Organizations

National Collegiate Honors Council
Council on Undergraduate Research
North Carolina Council on Undergraduate Research
South Atlantic Modern Language Association
American Association of University Professors

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Updated: Tuesday, September 24, 2013

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