Stories of some
Confederate Soldiers

 

Samuel Goodwin Hubbard


Samuel Goodwin Hubbard was born on the 2nd of June 1838 in Marlboro County, South Carolina. He was the oldest son of were Peter S. Hubbard and Matilda Jane Goodwin. In addition to Samuel, the Hubbards were the parents of six sons; John Goodwin Hubbard, Ebenezer Goodwin Hubbard, Laughlin Buie Hubbard, Peter Dudley Hubbard, Franklin Goodwin Hubbard and Eddie Brearly Hubbard, and eight daughters; Mary Ann Elizabeth Hubbard McLaurin, Emily Hubbard Adams, Flora Ellen Hubbard Adams, Juliana Hubbard Pearson, Kitty Hubbard McLaurin, Lucy Ann Hubbard Pate, Aginora Hubbard Pate and Matilda Margaret Hubbard Willis.

Samuel's maternal great-grandfather Samuel Goodwin, Sr. was a charter member of the Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry. Shortly after the grand Olde Company was formed on 23rd August 1793 in Fayetteville, North Carolina, Samuel Goodwin, Sr. moved his family to Marlboro County. His mother's Bright family for whom Brightsville was named had moved to South Carolina from Currituck County, North Carolina where they had lived from the 1740's.

Samuel's paternal Hubbards trace the roots of their family back to the early settlers of colonial Virginia. His sixth great-grandfather Robert Hubbard was born ca. 1602 in England and settled in York County, Virginia, where he died sometime around the 9th of February 1662. Samuel's great-great-grandmother Agnes Chiles Hubbard was the great-great-granddaughter of Walter Chiles, who was born may 1, 1572 in Wrington Parish, Somerset England and died in 1653 in the first permanent English settlement of Jamestowne, Virginia.

Samuel Goodwin Hubbard enlisted for the war in Secessionville, Marlboro County, South Carolina on the 17th of October 1861at the age of 24. He mustered in as a private into Captain R.C. Emanuel's Company, Hatch's Coast Rangers of the South Carolina Volunteers. This company subsequently became Company G of the 23rd Regiment of the South Carolina Infantry.

Samuel appears on the List of killed and wounded of 23rd Regiment of the South Carolina Volunteers in Virginia and Maryland. Samuel was wounded at Manassas Plains, Virginia sometime between August 29th and the 30th of 1862. His wound was in his thigh and the severity of the wound lead to his leg being amputated just below the knee.

On the Company Muster Roll dated January and February 1863 list Samuel as absent with the remarks "wounded at Manassas and on Furlough." The Examing Board discharged Samuel Goodwin Hubbard on the 4th of March 1863.

Although Samuel returned to South Carolina without his leg, he did mange to return with a captured Yankee sword. He captured the sword from a Yankee officer at the Battle of First Manassas. The sword had undoubtedly belonged to the officer's grandfather or other relative as it was from the War of 1812. The sword is know a treasured keepsake and remembrance of the sacrifice that Samuel Goodwin Hubbard made in defense of his great Southland, the sword is housed by a South Carolina descendent. Just a little over year after losing his leg in defense of his great Southland, Samuel married Flora Louise Burn on the 22nd of June 1864 in Marlboro County, South Carolina. Flora was the daughter of Rev. James Wilson Burn and Susan Louisa Roberts.

Sometime after their marriage the moved to Robeson County, North Carolina. They proceed to have six sons and four daughters over the period of twenty-two years. Eugene Hubbard was born the 24th of November 1865 in Robeson County, North Carolina, where he also died on the 5th of August 1933. Leighton Wilson Hubbard also lived his entire life in Robeson County being born there on the 14th of March 1868 and dying there on the 16th of May 1901. Hartstene Hubbard was born in Robeson County on the 19th of June 1870 and sometime before his death on the 4th of April 1946 returned to the homeland of his parents, Marlboro County, South Carolina. Hartstene was married to Annie Jane Mason on Christmas Eve 1889. Julian Hubbard was born on the 12th of February 1875 and married his first wife, Katie Paul, on the 30th of December 1897. After his wife's death, Julian married Annie McLellan in 1908. Samuel Brearly Hubbard was born on the 15th of August 1885 in the community of Purvis, which is located in southern Robeson County, North Carolina. He married Bessie Jane Brigman in Marion County, South Carolina on the 14th of January 1919. Samuel and Flora's youngest son, Luther B. Hubbard, was born on the 25th of January 1888 and departed this life just a little over a year later on the 16th of May 1889.

Samuel and Flora's oldest daughter, Estelle was born on the 15th of January 1891 and married J.A. Chapman. Lizzie Hubbard was born the 28th of February 1895 and married twice, first to a Mr. Harrelson and then to Bruce Culbreth. Rosa Burn Hubbard was born the 21st of June 1867 and married A.F. Thompson on the 24th of May 1896. Flora Louise Hubbard was on in June 1884 and married James N. Clark on the 10th of December 1905.

At the birth of her last child, Luther, Flora knew that her time here on earth among the loving and faithful members of her family was drawing ever so quickly to an end. She and Samuel had hired Miss Mary Belle Patterson to help care for and educate their children. Flora could sense the love that Miss Mary Belle felt for the children. So on her deathbed she begged and pleaded with her beloved Samuel, that at her death he must marry Mary Belle. Flora told him that the only way she could have a peaceful death was to know that Mary Belle was there to care for her children and bring them up the way that she would if she only had the time left here on earth. The last of the life slipped from Flora on the 22nd of February 1888. Eight months and five days later at the home of Archibald McColl in Thompsons Township in Robeson County, the beloved nurse and caretaker of the Hubbard children became their new stepmother. She not only cared and loved the children as if they were her own, but after Samuel's death on the 12th of October 1906 she lived with her step-daughter, Flora Hubbard Clark, until her own death in 1934.

Sources
National Archives


Levi Mason

Levi Mason was born in 1811 in Cumberland County, North Carolina. He was the son of Thomas Mason and Dorothy Upton.
Thomas, Levi's father, moved to Cumberland County from Craven County, North Carolina where his family had been since his great-great-great-grandfather, William Mason, arrived from England.
Levi married Eliza W. Parker on the 1st of February 1836 in Cumberland County, North Carolina.

They proceeded to have five daughters; Mary born 1839, Betsy born 1848, Nancy born 1850, Eliza Jane born in June of 1852 and Isabella born 1853 and two sons; John S. born 1852 and Thomas born 1855. Eliza Jane married Marshall Whitfield Grady, son of James Lee Grady and Winnifred Catherine Hill, sometime before 1867.

Levi enlisted for the war on March 3, 1862 at the age of 47. He mustered into Company D of the 51st North Carolina Troops. He appears on the records as a commissary guard at Fayetteville from July/August 1862 through October of 1864. Levi was transferred to Company G, 2nd Battalion North Carolina Defense Troops in November/December of 1864.

Levi Mason died sometime between 1880 and 1900 in Cumberland County, North Carolina.

Sources
NC Troops 1861-1865 A Rooster, Manarin, Louis H. Volume XII, page 316.
NC Troops 1861-1865 A Rooster, Manarin, Louis H. Volume III, page 369.


Alexander Mason

Alexander Mason was born on the 4th of December 1839 in Cumberland County, North Carolina. He was the oldest child of Foster Mason and Annie Marie Bolton. In addition to Alexander, Foster and Annie had five daughters; Mary Ann Mason Ham, Margaret Mason, Isabella Mason Taylor, Lovedy Jane Mason and Malinda Mason Taylor and two sons; John Foster Mason and Archibald Randall Mason.

The Masons had lived in North Carolina since the early 1700's when Ralph Mason moved from Virginia. Annie Marie Bolton's mother was Nancy Hussey, who could trace her family back to Christopher Hussey and his father-in-law, Rev. Stephen Batchelder. The story goes that Christopher Hussey was driven to Holland as a young man by religious persecution. There he met Theodate. Her father would agree to their marriage if they would migrate to America with him. They agreed. They sailed from Southampton, England, on the "William and Francis" in May 1630 and arrived at Charleston, MA, about 23 Jul. They settled first at Lynn, MA, and Christopher was listed as an original settler of Haverhill, MA. He was a elected freeman 14 May 1634. The family was in Hampton, NH, by 1639 where he was a representative in 1658, 1659, 1660 and a selectman 1650, 1658, 1664 and 1669, town clerk 1650 -1653. He was at one time "Kings Counselor" for NH. One of the original purchasers of Nantucket (for 30 pounds and 2 beaver hats) but never lived there. Hampton town records indicate he was buried there 8 Mar 1686.

Alexander enlisted for the fight for Southern Independence in Cumberland County, North Carolina on the 2nd of September 1863 at the age of 25. He mustered into Company C of the 2nd Battalion. Records show that he was present and accounted for December of 1864.

Several years after the war, Alexander married Annie Bolton on the 27 of May 1868.

Sources
NC Troops 1861-1865 A Rooster, Manarin, Louis H. Volume III, page 356.

 

David T. Grady

David T. Grady was born in February 1841 in Harnett County, North Carolina. He was the son of James Lee Grady and Winnifred Catherine Hill. In addition to David, James and Winnifred had five sons; James R. Grady born 1830, Phineas Hill Grady born 1837, Marshall Whitfield Grady born in March of 1843, William Curtis Grady born of the 21st of march 1845 and John G. H. Grady born in 1848, and three daughters; Elizabeth W. Grady born 1833, Nancy J. Grady born 1834 and Letta A. Grady born 1839.

The Gradys trace their family back to Duplin County, North Carolina and to David's great-uncle John Grady, the only patriot to be killed at the Battle of Moore's Creek Bridge during the American Revolution. The Hill family traces their family to Winnifred's great-great-grandfather Isaac Hill who although born in England chose to come to the new world and settled in Middlesex County, Virginia. Isaac's son, William Hill, was married sometime around 1741 to Margaret Jennings, daughter of the Virginia Governor Edmund Jennings. Winnifred's grandmother Jane Kenan Hill, wife of John Hill, was the daughter of Felix Kenan, who was born in Scotland and served with both the American and British Armies during the American Revolution.

David T. Grady enlisted for the War Between the States in Harnett County, North Carolina on the 27th of January 1862 at the age of 20. He mustered into Company K of the 38th Regiment as a private. The company's records show him present and accounted for until wounded in the left leg at Chancellorsville, Virginia on the 3rd of May 1863. He returned to active duty March/April 1864. David was present when General Robert E. Lee surrendered our marvelous Southland to General U.S. Grant at Appomattox Court House, VA April 9, 1865. David T. Grady died in Harnett County, North Carolina on the 15th of November 1922.

Sources
NC Troops 1861-1865 A Rooster, Manarin, Louis H. Volume X, page 97.

 


Marshall Whitfield Grady

Marshall Whitfield Grady was born in February of 1843 in Harnett County, North Carolina. He was the son of James Lee Grady and Winnifred Catherine Hill. In addition to Marshall, James and Winnifred had five sons; James R. Grady born 1830, Phineas Hill Grady born 1837, David T. Grady born in February 1841, William Curtis Grady born of the 21st of March 1845 and John G. H. Grady born in 1848, and three daughters; Elizabeth W. Grady born 1833, Nancy J. Grady born 1834 and Letta A. Grady born 1839.

The Gradys trace their family back to Duplin County, North Carolina and to Marshall's great-uncle John Grady, the only patriot to be killed at the Battle of Moore's Creek Bridge during the American Revolution. The Hill family traces their family to Winnifred's great-great-grandfather Isaac Hill who although born in England chose to come to the New World and settled in Middlesex County, Virginia. Isaac's son, William Hill, was married sometime around 1741 to Margaret Jennings, daughter of the Virginia Governor Edmund Jennings. Winnifred's grandmother Jane Kenan Hill, wife of John Hill, was the daughter of Felix Kenan, who was born in Scotland and served with both the American and British Armies during the American Revolution.

Marshall enlisted in Harnett County, North Carolina on 13th of October 1864 at the age of 20. Marshall was captured at Amelia Courthouse, Virginia on the 3rd of April 1865. He was transported to the Point Lookout Prison in Maryland, where he was confined until his release on the 27th of June 1865 after taking the Oath of Allegiance.

Marshall returned to Harnett County and sometime prior to 1870 married Eliza Jane Mason, daughter of Levi Mason and Eliza W. Parker. Eliza was in June of 1852 in Cumberland County, North Carolina. Marshall and Eliza proceeded to have two sons; James Lee and Phineas, both born in Harnett County two years apart the first being in 1867 and a daughter; Mary Winnifred born on the 15th of June 873 in Harnett County. Mary Winnifred married Steven James Hubbard in 1890 in Harnett County, North Carolina.

Marshall Whitfield Grady departed this life in 1909 in Harnett County and his beloved wife, Eliza, died twenty years later on the 22nd of August 1929 in Chalybeate Springs, North Carolina.


Sources
North Carolina Troops 1861-1865 A Roster, Jordan, Weymouth T. Jr. Volume X, page 97.

 

Charles Lide Burn


Charles Lide Burn was born on the 31st of August 1841 in Society Hills, South Carolina. He was the son of Rev. James Wilson Burn and Susan Lousia Roberts. In addition to Charles the Burns had four sons; John Roberts Burn, Robert Hayne Burn, Henry Cassels Burn and Edward Worth Burn, and four daughters; Elizabeth Burn Crowell, Flora Lousie Burn Hubbard, Sarah M. Burn and Rosa Amarantha Burn Parker.

Charles's parent's marriage was truly the merging of great Southern Families. His paternal grandmother Anna Lide Burn was the great great granddaughter of Henry Duke of Charles City, Virginia making her close cousins with the tobacco Duke family of Durham, North Carolina. His paternal grandfather, Absolum Burn, was a descendent of the Scottish poet, Robert Burns, through one of his many romantic encounters. His maternal grandfather, Rev. John Mitchell Roberts, was the founder of the Roberts Academy at High Hills, South Carolina. After his untimely death one of his colleagues, Rev. John Furman, took over the operation of Roberts Academy and the fruits of their labors can now be seen in the present day Furman University.

Charles's maternal grandmother, Martha Ann Glover Miller Roberts, is the great-great-great-granddaughter of George and Ann Marwood Durant. George Durant upon his decision to relocate his family to North Carolina chose to purchase his land from the Indians. Durant did not think it right to take possession of land, so he met the old Indian chief, Kilcokonem, and some of his braves out under a big tree near the chief's wigwam. There they decided on the price, and then the old chief gave Durant a deed to the land, the first deed on record of land bought from the Indians.

The land Durant bought, which was as fair a country as man ever looked upon, was at the mouth of the Perquimans River, a part of the strip lying between the beautiful Perquimans River on the west and her sister, Little River, on the east, and which was washed by broad Albemarle Sound on its southern shore. The beautiful Indian name for this strip, Wikacome, was now to give place to "Durant's Neck." George's wife, Ann Marwood Durant, made a name for herself in the early days of North Carolina by representing her husband and numerous others in court cases. She also operated a lodging house and was paid to arrange funerals.

Charles enlisted for the Great War in Columbia, South Carolina on the 6th of January 1864. He mustered into Company G of the 1st (McCreary's) South Carolina Infantry as private. The official records at the National Archives states that Charles Lide Burn was captured on the 12th of May 1864 near Spottsylvania Courthouse, Virginia. In conflict with the army's records, you find written in the Burn Family Bible that; Charles L. Burn departed this life May 12th, 1864 in the Battle of Spottsylvaina.

Sources
National Archives 267 Roll 127
Burn Family Bible Record


John Harold Hubbard

John Harold Hubbard was born on Christmas Day 1834 in Portland Maine. He was the son of John Hubbard and Harriet LeFavour. John left home at an early age for a life on the sea as a whaler. His ship was damaged off the North Carolina coast and he decided to try out his land legs. He traveled into the unfamiliar country until he arrived in Fayetteville, North Carolina.

On the 13th of December 1852 he married Jane Russell in Cumberland County, North Carolina. She died sometime prior to the 17th of June 1860, when he married his second wife Mary A. Winn.

John enlisted for the War Between the States in Cumberland County on the 18th of June 1861 at the age of 26. He was mustered into Company D of the 19th Regiment as a private. This is a fine example to defeat the northern argument that the war was fought over slavery. John Harold Hubbard did not own slaves; he was fighting for his new country the Confederate States of America because its freedoms were being threatened. John was captured in North Carolina on August 6, 1862 and was paroled and exchanged at Aiken's Landing, Virginia on the 6th of October 1862. John received a promotion to Corporal sometime in January or February of 1863. He was captured for a second time near Hanover, Pennsylvania on June 30, 1863 and take to the as a prisoner to the hellhole of the North, Elmira Prison at Elmira, New York. He was transferred to James River, Virginia for exchange on March 10, 1865 and was officially declared exchanged on the 15th of March 1865.

John returned home to Fayetteville, North Carolina his wife Mary had died during his time away at war. Later that year on the 30th of August he married Mary Elizabeth Talbot, daughter of John Nixion Talbot and Mary Ann Bunnell. They preceded to have five sons; John Edward, Steven James, Joseph Townsend, George Frank and Peter Nixion Hubbard and four daughters; Harriet, Mary Ann, Susan and Clarissa Eleanor Hubbard, all of whom were born in Cumberland County, North Carolina.

Their oldest son, John Edward Hubbard was born on the 1st of October 1867 and married twice to Mary Ellen Bunce and Delilah Lee Bryant. Steven James Hubbard was born on the 8th June 1868 and in 1890 married Mary Winifred Grady. On the 8th of November 1874 Joseph Townsend Hubbard was born, he married twice. He and his first wife, Maggie Jane Reaves, were married on the 18th of January 1897and after her death he married Sarah Ann Jones on the 23rd of April 1923. George Frank Hubbard was born on the 12th of February 1879 and married Catherine A. Draughon. John and Mary's youngest son, Peter Nixion Hubbard was born in August 1880 and on the 25th of February 1903 married Virginia Mae McCorquodale.

Harriet Hubbard, John and Mary's oldest daughter, was born on the 14th of July 1869 and married Edward Alexander Bolton on the 20th of December 1888. Mary Ann Hubbard, named for her mother, was born in 1871 and married W.B. West on the 12th of June 1889. Susan C. Hubbard was born in 1873 and married Willie Coleman on the 13th of October 1897. John and Mary's youngest daughter, Clarissa Eleanor Hubbard was born on the 12th of March 1878 and married a Mr. Bunce.

Mary Elizabeth Talbot Hubbard died in 1880. John Harold Hubbard continued to live on the farm near Linden, North Carolina until his death in June of 1900. He is buried in the cemetery of Parker's Grove United Methodist Church in Linden, North Carolina.


Sources
NC Troops 1861-1865, A Roster, Manarin, Louis Volume II, page 132

 

Ebenezer Wescot Goodwin

Ebenezer Wescot Goodwin was born 2 May 1823 Marlboro co, SC He was the son of Samuel Goodwin, Jr. and Drusilla Bright. His grandfather Samuel Goodwin, Sr. was a charter member of the Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry. Shortly after the grand Olde Company was formed on 23rd August 1793 in Fayetteville, North Carolina, Samuel Goodwin, Sr. moved his family to Marlboro County. His mother's Bright family for whom Brightsville was named had moved to South Carolina from Currituck County, North Carolina where they had lived from the 1740's. In addition to Ebenezer, the Goodwins had two older sons; John and Francis Goodwin, and three daughters; Emlie Goodwin McNeill, Pamelia Goodwin Wright and Matilda Jane Goodwin Hubbard.

Ebenezer married Lucy Ann Stubbs, who was born on the 7th of May 1828 in Marlboro County, South Carolina.

From the book, South Carolina Secedes we find out the following concerning Ebenezer life. Ebenezer Wescot Goodwin planter of Brightsville, Marlboro Co, District was born in Brightsville may 2 1823 son of Samuel Goodwin and Durcilla Bright Goodwin whose father had come to Marlboro from Greenville Co, NC in 1796. E.W. Goodwin was a man of great energy and in addition to his mill and farming interest, successfully conducted a mercantile business, amassing a considerable fortune. He was elected to the Secession Convention from Marlboro and signed the Ordinance of Secession. Squire Goodwin, as he was called, owned many thousands of acres and several homes. When Sherman marched through that section, he took one of the houses as his headquarters, and General Howard was at Goodwin's own residence at Goodwin's Mill. The stage line passed through the district, and the road from Cheraw to Laurel Hill, NC by Goodwin's Mill, was on the route from New Orleans to New York. After the war, squire Goodwin continued his agricultural and merchandising pursuits until his death January 3 1891 he was buried in a family plot near the homestead. Squire Goodwin as a member of the Methodist Church and a Mason.

Ebenezer and Lucy adopted a son; Ebenezer Wescot Goodwin, Jr. and two daughters Isabelle and Alice. Lucy Stubbs Goodwin continued to live in Marlboro County, South Carolina until her death on the 10th of June 1898.

Sources
South Carolina Secedes, May, John Amasa and Faunt, Joan Reynolds. University of South Carolina Press, Columbia, 1960, page 15.


Henry Castles Burn

Henry Castles Burn was born on the 1st of April 1839 in Society Hills, South Carolina. He was the son of Rev. James Wilson Burn and Susan Lousia Roberts. In addition to Henry the Burns had four sons; John Roberts Burn, Robert Hayne Burn, Charles Lide Burn and Edward Worth Burn, and four daughters; Elizabeth Burn Crowell, Flora Lousie Burn Hubbard, Sarah M. Burn and Rosa Amarantha Burn Parker.

Henry's parents' marriage was truly the merging of great Southern Families. His paternal grandmother Anna Lide Burn was the great-great-granddaughter of Henry Duke of Charles City, Virginia making her close cousins with the tobacco Duke family of Durham, North Carolina. His paternal grandfather, Absolum Burn, was a descendent of the Scottish poet, Robert Burns, through one of his many romantic encounters. His maternal grandfather, Rev. John Mitchell Roberts, was the founder of the Roberts Academy at High Hills, South Carolina. After his untimely death one of his colleagues, Rev. John Furman, took over the operation of Roberts Academy and the fruits of their labors can now be seen in the present day Furman University.

Henry's maternal grandmother, Martha Ann Glover Miller Roberts, is the great-great-great-granddaughter of George and Ann Marwood Durant. George Durant upon his decision to relocate his family to North Carolina chose to purchase his land from the Indians. Durant did not think it right to take possession of land, so he met the old Indian chief, Kilcokonem, and some of his braves out under a big tree near the chief's wigwam. There they decided on the price, and then the old chief gave Durant a deed to the land, the first deed on record of land bought from the Indians.

The land Durant bought, which was as fair a country as man ever looked upon, was at the mouth of the Perquimans River, a part of the strip lying between the beautiful Perquimans River on the west and her sister, Little River, on the east, and which was washed by broad Albemarle Sound on its southern shore. The beautiful Indian name for this strip, Wikacome, was now to give place to "Durant's Neck." George's wife, Ann Marwood Durant, made a name for herself in the early days of North Carolina by representing her husband and numerous others in court cases. She also operated a lodging house and was paid to arrange funerals.

Henry Cassels Burn entered the Confederate Army as a private in Company B, 2nd South Carolina Infantry, also known as the 2nd Palmetto Regiment. He had enlisted in Greenville, South Carolina on the 13th of April 1861. Henry was captured in Knoxville, Tennessee on the 18th of December 1863 and sent to Camp Chase, Ohio on the 1st of January 1864. Henry Cassels Burn took the Oath of Allegiance at Rock Island Barracks, Illinois on the 20th of June 1865.

Henry Cassels Burn married Jane McIntosh on the 28th of May 1866 at Society Hill, South Carolina. On the 6th of September 1874 he married Martha E. Ellis at Society Hill, South Carolina.

Sources
National Archives 267 Roll 153
The Story of George Durant, Pioneer Settler in North Carolina, Walters, Ida, 1918 as it appeared in The Teacher Training School Quarterly


Phineas Hill Grady

Phineas Hill Grady was born in 1839 in Harnett County, North Carolina. He was the son of James Lee Grady and Winnifred Catherine Hill. In addition to Phineas, James and Winnifred had five sons; James R. Grady born 1830, David T. Grady born in February 1841, Marshall Whitfield Grady born in March of 1843, William Curtis Grady born of the 21st of March 1845 and John G. H. Grady born in 1848, and three daughters; Elizabeth W. Grady born 1833, Nancy J. Grady born 1834 and Letta A. Grady born 1839.

The Gradys trace their family back to Duplin County, North Carolina and to Marshall's great-uncle John Grady, the only patriot to be killed at the Battle of Moore's Creek Bridge during the American Revolution. The Hill family traces their family to Winnifred's great-great-grandfather Isaac Hill who although born in England chose to come to the New World and settled in Middlesex County, Virginia. Isaac's son, William Hill, was married sometime around 1741 to Margaret Jennings, daughter of the Virginia Governor Edmund Jennings. Winnifred's grandmother Jane Kenan Hill, wife of John Hill, was the daughter of Felix Kenan, who was born in Scotland and served with both the American and British Armies during the American Revolution.

Phineas enlisted for the Great War in Harnett County on the 18th of May 1861 at the age of 22. He mustered in to Company F of the 15th North Carolina Regiment as a private. He was present and accounted for until wounded at Malvern Hill, Virginia on the 1st July 1862. He died in Richmond on the 9th of July 1862 of his wounds.


Sources
NC Troops 1861 - 1865 A Rooster, Jordan, Weymouth T, Jr. Volume V, Page 562.


Rev. Dennis Harris Callihan

Rev. Dennis Harris Callihan was born in 1834 in Columbus County, North Carolina. He was the son of Isaac Callihan and Eliza Jane Turner. Isaac Callihan was born in 1780 in Ireland and married his North Carolina native wife sometime around 1833. In addition to Dennis the Callihan's five other sons born after their move to Bladen County, North Carolina; William Jenkin Callihan was born 1842 in Bladen County, North Carolina and died in the Elmira Prison on the 14th of March 1865, Neill A. Callihan was born the 11th of April 1845, Oberton Taylor D. Callihan was born in 1849, Isaac A. Callihan was born in 1856 and David Harris Callihan was born on the 3rd of June 1856.

Dennis married Elizabeth Ann Wilson on the 15th of June 1854 in Fayetteville, North Carolina. Elizabeth was the daughter of Burrell & Susannah Wilson. They settled in Cumberland County, North Carolina and there proceeded to have two children, Margaret Ann Callihan born on the 2nd of November 1858 and William Jenkin Callihan born in 1859. Margaret Ann married Archibald Randall Mason on the 22nd of May 1878.

Dennis enlisted for the Great War for Southern Independence in Bladen County, North Carolina on the 10th of May 1861. He mustered into Company H of the 3rd North Carolina Troops as a private. Confederate records show that he was present and accounted for until January/February 1862 when the records of the company show him serving as a nurse at the College Hospital (also known as General hospital) in Goldsboro.

Dennis was severely wounded at Gettysburg on the 2nd of July and left in the hands of the enemy on the 5th of July 1863. He was admitted to the USA General Hospital at Chester, PA on the 11th of July 1863. He was discharged for the hospital and sent to Point Lookout Prison in Maryland on the 2nd of October 1863. While a prisoner at Point Lookout, Dennis was offered his freedom in exchange for his enlisting in the Army of the United States of America. The conditions being so bad at Point Lookout and the promise that he would not be sent to fight against his Southland, he became a galvanized Yankee. Dennis enlisted with the Union forces on the 23rd of January 1864 in Maryland. According to Dennis's examination report dated the 1st of February 1864, he was 30 and his occupation was Clergyman. He had had affliction of the heart in 1862 but had never had fits, wounds of the head, fractured bones, was not in the habit of drinking. He also had trouble in urinating and other than his gunshot wound he had no problems.
He was mustered into Company A of the 1st Regiment U.S. Volunteers on the 1st of May 1864 in Norfolk, Virginia and his records show that he was 5 ft 11 1/2 inches with a light complexion, blue eyes and brown hair. From the time of his enlistment until he mustered in he was a private at the time of his muster he was promoted to Sergeant. On the 1st of November 1864 he was appointed 1st Sergeant by the order Lt. Col. Tamnblyn.
Dennis was discharged at Leavennworth, Kansas on the 11th of May 1864.

Dennis returned to Cumberland County, North Carolina, where he continued to live until his death on the 16th of September 1893. Elizabeth Ann Wilson Callihan died sometime after 1904.

Sources
National Archives Confederate and Union War Records.
Pension records for Elizabeth Ann Wilson Callihan.

 

Benjamin Tyner

Benjamin Tyner, III was on the 19th of November 1828. He was the son of Benjamin Tyner, Jr. Ben's great-great-great-grandfather, Nicolas Tyner, settled in Isle of Wight County, Virginia and his son, Nicholas Tyner, II moved into Northampton County, North Carolina. Nicholas Tyner, III moved his family to Johnston County where his son, Benjamin Tyner, I served in the Revolutionary War. By 1810 he and his son, Benjamin Tyner, II are listed on the Robeson County Census.

Benjamin married Mary Ann Prevatte on the 30 of January 1850 in Robeson County, North Carolina. She was the daughter of Rev. James J. Prevatte and Orra Moore. The Prevatte family traces its lineage back to Elizabeth's great-great-great-grandfather, Prerrie Prevol, who was born in 1673 in Guines Pas-De-Calais, France and settled in Manakintown, Virginia in 1700. Mary Ann's father, Rev. Prevatte, donated the land for Raft Swamp Baptist Church and paid the first year's salary for the preacher.

Benjamin and Mary were charter members of Raft Swamp Baptist Church when it was formed on the 29th of September 1854, and on the 14th of October of that year, Ben was elected treasurer.

Benjamin and Elizabeth had four sons; Alvin, Elias Warren, James Thomas and Benjamin J. and three daughters; Margaret Lanoral, Aury Etta and Dovie Jane all of who were born in Robeson County, North Carolina. Alvin Tyner was born on the 22nd of June 1850 and married a Miss Bullard. Elias Warren Tyner was born on the 10th of December 1853 and married Martha Elizabeth Townsend, daughter of Alfred Townsend and Margaret Peggy Britt. James Thomas Tyner was born on the 11th of May 1860 and married Sarah Jane Davis on the 8th of January 1880. The youngest son, Benjamin J, Tyner was born on the 5th of December 1861 and on the 5th of March 1891 married Mary Downie Ausley.

Their oldest daughter, Margaret Lanoral Tyner, was born on the 15th of May 1852 and married Will Baxley. Aury Etta Tyner was born on the 19th of April 1855 and Dovie Jane Tyner was born on the 24th of January 1858.

Benjamin enlisted in Wilmington, North Carolina on the 14th of May 1862. He mustered into Company F of the 3rd Regiment as a Private. His enlisting officer was Captain William Murdock Parsley; husband of Mrs. Elizabeth Nutt Parsley, Founder of the North Carolina Division of the United Daughters of the Confederacy. Benjamin Tyner, III died of typhoid fever at his regiment's camp, just below Richmond, Virginia on the 20th of August 1862. His widow, Mary Ann Prevatte Tyner continued to live on their family farm until her death on the 29th of May 1914. In 1901 she applied for and received widow's pension from the State of North Carolina.

Sources
Tyner Family 1704-1971 and Bruce Relations in Robeson County, NC, Peggy Tyner Townsend 1972. P.2-3

Daniel Munn

Daniel Munn was born March 13, 1831, the son of Daniel and Mary Campbell Munn. His father purchased 340 acres of land, three miles west of Tar Hell, North Carolina in 1801, from John and Thomas Robeson. He built a home on this tract of land in 1825 and from this house Daniel left to defend the cause of the confederacy.

When the Maysville Light Infantry was organized on the 17th of November 1860 at Tar Heel, NC, Daniel was one of the organizing members. He commanded Company B of the 36th Regiment, known as the Bladen Stars, which was stationed at Fort Fisher.


With the fall of Fort Fisher, the captured officers, among which was Captain Munn, were sent to the Federal prison on Governor's Island, New York. After he was released from prison, he walked back to his home in North Carolina.

During the War, Captain Munn had meet Miss Isabella F. Cobb, of Maxton, North Carolina. She had gone to Fort Fisher to visit her two brothers, Archie and John Cobb, who were stationed there in Captain Munn's Company. They were married on the 13th of October 1863.

They were the parents of five sons; John Archibald Munn, Alexander Lamb Munn, Angus Evander Munn, Wiely Cobb Munn and Daniel Campbell Munn and four daughters; Sally McMillian Munn, Mary Eliza Walker Munn, Genieve Munn and Fannie Bell Munn.

Captain Munn was a member of Beth Carr Presbyterian Church in Tar Heel, North Carolina. Captain Munn left this life on the 4th of March 1904 and is buried in the cemetery of the Saint Pauls Presbyterian Church in Saint Pauls, North Carolina.

Sources
The Bladen Journal, Thursday, July 19, 1962

 

Daniel McEachern

Daniel McEachern was born June 17, 1831, the son of Hugh McEachern and Sally Campbell. In addition to Daniel the couple also had two sons; Neill C. McEachern and Angus McEachern and two daughters; Mary and Christian McEachern.

Daniel died in August 1862

Daniel is buried in the McEachern Cemetery located on Hwy. 20 just West of Saint Pauls, North Carolina. On his tombstone we find the following inscription: A Patriotic citizen serving faithfully the cause of the South until his death.

 

Neill C. McEachern

Neill C. McEachern was born on August 28, 1822, the son of Hugh McEachern and Sally Campbell. In addition to Neill, they were the parents of two sons; Daniel and Angus and two daughters; Mary and Christian.

Neill died in December 1864 and is buried in the McEachern Cemetery located on Hwy. 20 just West of Saint Pauls, North Carolina. On his tombstone we find the following inscription: He was an honored citizen a true patriot serving in the war between the states until his death.


Angus McEachern

Angus McEachern was born sometime around 1830, the son of Hugh McEachern and Sally Campbell. In addition to Angus the couple had two sons; Daniel and Neill C. and two daughters; Mary and Christian.

Angus died on June 16, 1864. He is buried in the McEachern Cemetery located on Hwy. 20 just West of Saint Pauls, North Carolina.


Ross McQueen Townsend

Ross McQueen Townsend was born in 1842, the son of Charles Townsend and Martha Blount Humphrey.

He served in Company D of the 18th Regiment Infantry. He married first Margaret Horn. They had two sons, Charles Townsend born 1867 and Berry Townsend born 1868. Margaret died in 1898 and Ross married for the second time to Dorica Fields of Britts Township, Robeson County, North Carolina. In the September 28, 1900 issue of The Argus, it states W.G. Pope married the couple and that Mr. Pope performed the ceremony although he was sick in bed with the grippe.

Ross McQueen Townsend died in Robeson County, North Carolina in 1902.

Sources
The Townsend Family 1748-1970, Peggy Tyner Townsend 1970 page 15

 


Alfred Townsend

Alfred Townsend was born November 12, 1819 in Robeson County, North Carolina, the son of Charles Townsend and Martha Blount Humphrey.

Alfred married first, Edith Humphrey, daughter of Benjamin Humphrey. The had four sons; James Pinkney, William, Neill and Charles and two daughters; Roseanna and Sarah Jane, all of whom were born in Robeson County, North Carolina. Neill was born December 13, 1838, on January 3, 1868 he married Narcissa Howell. He died in 1904. Charles was born July 16, 1840 and died April 25, 1922. He married Catherine Baker on December 21, 1865. William was born April 22, 1842 and died February 3, 1927. He was married to Orra Prevatte.

Roseanna was born June 21, 1846 and died January 19, 1919. She married Alex R. Townsend. Sarah Jane was born in 1847 and died in 1921. On November 25, 1870, she married Arch Britt. After Edith's death Alfred married Margaret Peggy Britt, daughter of William and Elizabeth Britt.

Alfred and Peggy were the parents of five sons; Major Alfred, Floyd Frank, Joseph, Richard and Stephen, and four daughters, Helen, Julia, Mittie and Martha Elizabeth. Major Alfred married Helen Barker on January 20, 1875. Floyd Frank was born after the great unpleasantness on April 17, 1865 and married Sophia Page. Joseph was born May 22, 1869 and married Mary F. Smith. Stephen and Amanda Bullock were married on February 24, 1898. Helen was born in April 1857 and on May 20, 1874 married William Collen Prevatte. Julia in 1898 married Stephen Davis. Mittie was born August 17, 1871 and on November 6, 1898 married Thomas Ray Britt. Martha Elizabeth was born November 13, 1860 and married Elias Warren Tyner on October 11, 1877.

Alfred enlisted for the war on July 3,1864 in McLeans Reserve Forces Co B 73 ret.

Alfred lived until October 12, 1893.


Sources
The Townsend Family 1748-1970, Peggy Tyner Townsend 1970 page 10

Tyner Family 1704-1971 and Bruce Relations in Robeson County, NC, Peggy Tyner Townsend 1972. P.7

Alfred M. Prevatt

Alfred M. Prevatt was born in 1835 in Robeson County, North Carolina, the son of James J. Prevatt and Orra Moore. In addittion to Alfred, James and Orra had three daughters, Mary Ann Prevatte Tyner, Clarissa Prevatte Prevatt Baxley, Orra Prevatte Townsend and seven sons, James Pinkney, Thomas, Eliaz, John, Furney, King David and William Collen.
Alfred married Miss Frances Bryant on March 21, 1861 in Robeson County. They had one son, Alford Haynes Prevatt. Alfred enlisted for the War in Robeson County on May 14, 1862 at the age of 28. He mustered into Company F of the 3rd Regiment, North Carolina Troops as a private. He was present and accounted for until he died at the hospital in Liberty, Virginia on December 4, 1862. After Alfred's death Frances married Noah Brigman.

Sources

The Prevattes of Robeson County, AC Prevatte 1992

North Carolina Troops 1861-1865 A Rooster

 

Eli Prevatt

Eli Prevatt was born in 1834 in Robeson County, North Carolina. On February 16, 1855 he married Clarissa Prevatt, daughter of James J. Prevatt and Orra Moore.

Eli and Clarissa were the parents of three children; Rosa Jane, Malcolm and Holand. Rosa Jane was born in January 1856 in Robeson County and on December 21, 1884, she married George Baxley. Malcolm was born in 1858 and Holand followed in 1860.

Eli enlisted for the War on May 14, 1862 at the age of 26. He mustered into Company F of the 3rd Regiment as a Private. He was present and accounted for until killed on May 3, 1862 at Chancellorsville, Virginia. After his death Clarissa married Alfred Baxley.

Sources

The Prevattes of Robeson County, AC Prevatte 1992
North Carolina Troops 1861-1865 A Rooster


John Prevatt

John Prevatt was born November 20, 1810 in Robeson County, North Carolina, the som of Thomas Prevatt and Sally West. In addtiion to John, the Prevatts were parents of five daughters, Elizabeth, Polly, Sally, Helen and Nancy, who married Alexander Britt, and five sons; Elias W., Furney, William, James J. and Thomas.

John Prevatt was married on May 8, 1851 to Elvy Lewis, daughter of Benjamin Lewis and Latita Page. They had one son, John Timothy Prevatt born October 31, 1854 in Robeson County. He married Marne Annie Johnson sometime in 1882.

At the time that John enlisted for the war on February 8, 1862, he was listed as a blacksmith. He mustered into Company A of the 46th Regiment as a private. He was present and accounted for until he was discahrege on October 5, 1862, the cause being listed as Bright's Disease of the kidneys together with chronic bronchitis. John returned to Robeson County, where he lived until August 1896.

Sources
The Prevattes of Robeson County, AC Prevatte 1992
North Carolina Troops 1861-1865 A Rooster

 

Andrew J. Prevatt


Andrew J. Prevatt was born in 1838 in Robeson County, North Carolina, the son of Wright Prevatt and Anna Lamb. They were also the parents of two daughter, Clarissa and Allis Prevatte Nye and nine sons; Archibald, Michael, Jordan, Peter Pinkney, James P., William W., Willie, Richard Rhodes and Zacharius R. Prevatte.

On March 12, 1859, Andrew married Martha Mitchell, Daughter of Miles N. Mitchell and Elva Bullock. They were the parents of one son, Miles and two daughters, Appa and Martha Ann all of whom were born in Robeson County, North Carolina. Miles was born January 12, 1860 and married Florence Elizabeth Spivey on April 28, 1890. Appa was born January 6, 1860 and on August 6, 1877 she married James W. Bullard. Their youngest child Martha Ann was born in early 1864.

Andrew was a farmer at the time that he enlisted at Camp Holmes, near Wilmington for the war. He mustered into Company E of the 51st Regiment as a private on May 10, 1862. He was hospitalized at Wilmington on or about June 16, 1862 with orcitis. Records show that he deserted on July 27, 1862 and returned to duty prior to September 1, 1862. He more than likely had gone home to check on he wife and children, as so many of the soldiers did during the war. He was listed as being in Robson County on sick leave from Janu 20 through June 30, 1863. He returned to duty once angain and was accounted for until April 1864. Andrew died at home with his family in Robeson County of disease on August 5, 1864. After his death Martha married William J. Burchett.

Sources
The Prevattes of Robeson County, AC Prevatte 1992
North Carolina Troops 1861-1865 A Rooster

 

  Updated: 
Comments to:carolinastories@bbtyner.com
© 2002 Blake Tyner, Pembroke, NC
Blake Tyner
P.O. Box 3636
Pembroke, North Carolina 29536
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