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Contact Information

NCAS 110th Annual Meeting
PO Box 1510
Pembroke, NC 28372

Phone: 910.775.4274
Fax:
910.522.5754
Email:
maria.santisteban@uncp.edu

Location: Oxendine, Room 2232
Campus Map

 

Guest Speakers

Plenary | Keynote

Workshop | Special Session

PLENARY SPEAKER

   
Eric Green

Dr. Eric D. Green, M.D.
Director of the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, Maryland

Plenary Address: “The Human Genomics Landscape: Bringing Genomic Medicine into Focus” on Friday evening, April 5.

Eric D. Green, M.D., Ph.D. is the Director of the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), a position he has held since late 2009. NHGRI is the largest organization in the world solely dedicated to genomics research. Previously, he served as the NHGRI Scientific Director (2002-2009), Chief of the NHGRI Genome Technology Branch (1996-2009), and Director of the NIH Intramural Sequencing Center (1997-2009).

While directing an independent research program for almost two decades, Dr. Green was at the forefront of efforts to map, sequence, and understand eukaryotic genomes, including significant, start-to-finish involvement in the Human Genome Project.

Now, as Director of NHGRI, Dr. Green is responsible for providing overall leadership of the Institute’s research portfolio and other initiatives; this requires significant coordination with other NIH components and funding agencies. Most recently, Dr. Green led NHGRI to the completion of a strategic planning process that yielded a new vision for the future of genomics research, entitled Charting a course for genomic medicine from base pairs to bedside (Nature 470:204-213, 2011).
 

KEYNOTE SPEAKER

   
David Micklos

Mr. David Micklos
Executive Director, DNA Learning Center (DNALC) at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, New York

Keynote Address:  “Engineering Society: The American Eugenics Movement” on Saturday morning, April 6

David Micklos is founder and executive director of the DNA Learning Center (DNALC) at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. The nation’s first science center devoted to public genetics education, the DNALC operates six teaching laboratories that provide hands-on science experiences to 30,000 students per year. The DNALC’s Internet portal hosts 21 proprietary content and bioinformatics sites, which receive 7.4 million visitors annually.

Mr. Micklos is author of two popular textbooks, DNA Science and Genome Science. He received the 1990 Dana Award for Pioneering Achievement in Education, the 2011 Science Prize for Online Resources in Education, and the 2012 Genetics Society of America Award for Excellence in Education. He is the only CSHL staff member to receive an honorary doctorate from its Watson School of Biological Sciences.
 

WORKSHOP SPEAKERS

   
Photo of Roy Charles

Mr. Roy Charles, M.Ed
UNC Chapel Hill, The Graduate School,
Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Workshop: Graduate and Professional School
(including a panel discussion followed by
breakout sessions)

Roy Anthony Charles is currently the Director of Diversity, Recruitment, and Retention for The
Graduate School, as well as a PhD Candidate in Educational Psychology at the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH). Roy's work in both roles focuses on understanding motivational factors affecting individuals in higher education and research careers. Prior to coming to UNC-CH Roy held several positions focused on the development and implementation of STEM initiatives. Prior to coming to UNC-CH, he was Assistant Dean for Graduate Students at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

   
Jeffrey Coker

Dr. Jeffrey S. Coker
Elon University, Elon, North Carolina

Workshop: Teaching Science for Global Citizenship

Dr. Jeffrey S. Coker is Associate Professor of Biology and the Director of General Studies at Elon University. He is the author of two new books, Reinventing Life: A Guide to Our Evolutionary Future, a book for the general public exploring how humans are driving evolutionary forces in the modern world, and Exploring Plants: Inquiry-based Activities for Learning Plant Biology, published by the American Society of Plant Biologists. Dr. Coker oversees general education programs at Elon and has led educational initiatives for several state and national scientific societies. His work is commonly used in high school and college classrooms. 
   
James Fuller

Dr. James Fuller
Laboratory Corporation of America, Burlington, North Carolina

Workshop: Human Cell Line Contamination: Denial, Acceptance, and Authentication

Dr. James Fuller is a director of DNA Identification Testing for the Laboratory Corporation of America. He has reviewed over 35,000 DNA identification cases and been admitted as an expert witness on DNA testing in the state of North Carolina. 

Dr. Fuller began his scientific odyssey in the 82nd Airborne Division with the groundbreaking insight that science is more fun than jumping out of airplanes. He followed his vision to East Carolina University and the University of North Carolina earning a M.S. and Ph.D. Dr. Fuller actively helps to develop the next generation of scientists by volunteering in activities ranging from kindergarten science demonstrations to leadership mentoring for undergraduates.

   
Photo of Tim Marks

Mr. Tim Marks
Campbell University, Buies Creek, North Carolina

Workshop: Graduate and Professional School
(including a panel discussion followed by
breakout sessions)

Tim Marks earned a B.S. in biology from Butler University (’03), where he was a 4-year varsity athlete in baseball and an Academic All-American in 2003. He earned a Professional Science Master’s (PSM) from NC State (’10) in microbial biotechnology. The program combines microbiology, biotechnology, and business coursework. He did an internship in first generation biofuels at Novozymes in 2009. He has been working at Campbell University from July 2010 to the present as an instructor in the pharmaceutical sciences program. He has served on the Master of Science in Pharmaceutical Sciences admissions committee since 2010. He is currently working on a PhD in microbiology- research in a lab at Campbell for a PhD through NCSU.

   
Photo of Jennifer Mish

Ms. Jennifer Mish
Methodist University Physician Assistant Program,
Fayetteville, NC

Workshop: Graduate and Professional School
(including a panel discussion followed by
breakout sessions)

Originally from Raleigh, NC, I earned my BS degree in 2002 and MBA in 2011 from Methodist University. From July 2002-May 2006, I worked in undergraduate admissions at Methodist University as the Assistant Director of Admissions. In May 2006, I assumed the role of the Director of Physician Assistant Admissions. Since 2006, my role within the PA program has evolved from working solely with admissions and recruiting to being more actively involved with our continuous accreditation, program development, grant writing and the expansion of the program. 

   
Photo of Lawrence Reagan

Dr. Lawrence Reagan
University of South Carolina School of Medicine,
Columbia, South Carolina

Workshop: Graduate and Professional School
(including a panel discussion followed by
breakout sessions)

Lawrence Reagan received his PhD from the University of Pennsylvania and performed postdoctoral studies at The Rockefeller University.  Dr. Reagan is currently an Associate Professor and Vice Chair in the Pharmacology, Physiology and Neuroscience Department at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine (USC SoM).  Beyond research activities on the neuroplasticity of the hippocampus and amygdala, he also serves as the Director of the Neuroscience Focus Group at the USC SoM.  In this capacity, Dr. Reagan has provided guidance regarding graduate school admission and life as a graduate student at regional meetings and on undergraduate campuses throughout the Southeast.

   
Anne Rosenwald

Dr. Anne G. Rosenwald
Georgetown University, Washington, DC

Workshop: The Human Microbiome Project: An Opportunity for Student Learning

Anne Rosenwald is a member of the Biology faculty at Georgetown University. She earned her Ph.D. from the Johns Hopkins University, followed by post-doctoral training at the Carnegie Institution of Washington and the National Cancer Institute. Her research involves control of membrane traffic in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the related pathogenic species, Candida glabrata. Support comes from NSF. 

Dr. Rosenwald is a 2011 winner of the Georgetown College Dean’s Teaching Award and a 2012 Bioscience Education Network Scholar. She is also co-director of Georgetown’s innovative Biology of Global Health major. Currently, she is developing the Genome Solver project, funded by NSF, which seeks to train faculty in using data from the Human Microbiome Project for teaching and research (genomesolver.org).
 

Special Session Speakers

   
Photograph of Debby Hanmer

Dr. Debby Hanmer
UNC Pembroke, Pembroke, North Carolina

Special Session: Seed Industry Consolidation and
Its Consequences

Dr. Debby Hanmer is an Assistant Professor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Biology Department  at the University of  North Carolina at Pembroke. Dr. Hanmer received a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in nursing and worked for many years as a nurse practitioner. During that time she discovered a real passion for the plant world and eventually went back to school at the Ohio State University earning a Ph.D. in plant pathology. Dr Hanmer is currently teaching a variety of courses including botany, mycology, plant physiology and principles of sustainable agriculture.  Her research area of interest revolves around the use of biochar (natural charcoal) as a soil amendment. 

   
Photo of Julie Horvath

Dr. Julie Horvath
NCMNS, Nature Research Center, Raleigh, North Carolina and NC Central University, Durham, North Carolina

Special Session: Research and Outreach at the Nature Research Center: What Can We Learn About Human Health From Primate Genomics and Armpit Microbes?

Dr. Julie Horvath is a comparative evolutionary genomicist interested in understanding the evolutionary forces that have shaped primate genomes and that cause human disease. Genetic and genomic comparisons between humans and our closest relatives, the primates, are crucial for understanding our own evolution and unique characteristics. The foundation of Dr. Horvath’s research is based on species relationships, or phylogenies, which she first established for lemurs, and more recently, for all primates. These species relationships are applied to many of her research questions to investigate the connection between genotype (DNA sequence) and phenotype (traits/characteristics) that make flora and fauna unique.
   
Photograph of Kristina Hubbard

Kristina Hubbard
Organic Seed Alliance, Port Townsend, Washington

Special Session: Seed Industry Consolidation and
Its Consequences

Kristina Hubbard is the director of advocacy and communications for Organic Seed Alliance. She's worked for a decade as an organizer, researcher, and writer on projects involving agricultural biotechnology and antitrust issues in the seed industry. She’s the co-author of Organic Seed Alliance's State of Organic Seed report and author of the National Family Farm Coalition's Out of Hand: Farmers Face the Consequences of a Consolidated Seed Industry. Hubbard serves on the board of directors for the Montana Department of Agriculture's Organic Commodity Advisory Council.

   
Photograph of David Micklos

Mr. David Micklos
Executive Director, DNA Learning Center (DNALC) at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, New York

Special Session: iPlant Collaborative Project

David Micklos is founder and executive director of the DNA Learning Center (DNALC) at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. The nation’s first science center devoted to public genetics education, the DNALC operates six teaching laboratories that provide hands-on science experiences to 30,000 students per year. The DNALC’s Internet portal hosts 21 proprietary content and bioinformatics sites, which receive 7.4 million visitors annually.

Mr. Micklos is author of two popular textbooks, DNA Science and Genome Science. He received the 1990 Dana Award for Pioneering Achievement in Education, the 2011 Science Prize for Online Resources in Education, and the 2012 Genetics Society of America Award for Excellence in Education. He is the only CSHL staff member to receive an honorary doctorate from its Watson School of Biological Sciences.
   
Lee Phillips

Dr. Lee Phillips
UNC Pembroke, Pembroke, North Carolina

Special Session: Beyond the Naked Eye: Scanning Electron Microscopy and Electron Probe Micro-Analyses

Dr. Lee Phillips is an Associate Professor of Geology and the Director of the Pembroke Undergraduate Research and Creativity (PURC) Center at UNC Pembroke. He also serves as the Director of the Southeastern North Carolina Microanalytical and Imaging Consortium (SENCR-MIC), a collaborative research laboratory with Fayetteville State University. His research interests range from understanding climatic influences on the evolution of modern landscapes, to using isotopic and elemental geochemistry to interpret ancient climatic variability and sea level changes. The PURC Center is focused on providing students with opportunities for extracurricular, faculty-mentored scholarship. The SENCR-MIC strives to offer faculty, industry, and other users, state of the art microimaging and analytical facilities to carry out cutting edge, transformative research in a comfortable setting.
   
 

More Workshop and Special Session Speakers to Come!

 

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Updated: Monday, April 1, 2013

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PO Box 1510 Pembroke, NC 28372-1510 • 910.521.6000