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Tuesday, April 27, 2010

Earth Day: The word is out at UNCP

UNC Pembroke observed Earth Day on April 22, and if a Newswire random sample is accurate, the students got it.

Trash to Treasure - Student Involvement & Leadership’s Teresa Bryant and Cynthia Oxendine helped students like David Redman of Lumberton, N.C., celebrate Earth Day. They demonstrated recycled crafts (a bowling pin and ball are displayed), gave out wildflower seeds and accepted old cell phones and glasses for recycling.

Trash to Treasure - Student Involvement & Leadership’s Teresa Bryant and Cynthia Oxendine helped students like David Redman of Lumberton, N.C., celebrate Earth Day. They demonstrated recycled crafts (a bowling pin and ball are displayed), gave out wildflower seeds and accepted old cell phones and glasses for recycling.

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Cell phones were recycled in the James B. Chavis University Center and trash-to-treasure art was on display.

UNCP biologist Debbie Hanmer made biochar, a soil additive used by ancient people to retain nutrients and keep soil fertile. It will be used in several “green” experiments to better understand how it works.

Sodexo Food Services at UNCP, and its 40 other Carolina campuses, offered peanut butter and jelly sandwiches served with a bit of Earth day news. Students consumed the sandwiches and absorbed the information.

Anitra Williams of Charlotte, N.C., took a bite and said “it is good!”

“I’ve had plenty of PB&Js, but not grilled,” Williams said. “It’s a nice twist.”

These were not your mother’s PB&Js!

Jacob Ferguson gave his PB&J a thumbs up!

Jacob Ferguson gave his PB&J a thumbs up!

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Jacob Ferguson of Beaver Falls, N.Y., gave it a big thumbs up, but his lunch mate Tyrell Walker of Dayton, Ohio, had doubts about “hot jelly.” If he didn’t eat any peanut butter, Walker was clued in about Earth Day.

“I’ve tried not to use any paper today,” he said.

Lauren Troxler of Durham, N.C., said she read about Earth Day on Facebook early that morning.

“Be green,” she said.

Phillip Charles of Dallas, Texas, said he heard about Earth Day from Google’s homepage, which sported a “green” themed logo. He was eating a salad.

“It’s healthy for me and the earth,” Charles said.

Katie Lewis of Fayetteville, N.C., said she heard it on the news.

“What am I doing on Earth Day?” she asked. “I’m eating peanut butter and jelly and saving farm land.

I read that standing in line,” she said, “but I try to recycle too.”

Goldie Edwards, a Sodexo supervisor, said Earth Day feeds the students a little fun and information.

Why PB&J? The products in peanut butter and jelly take less fertile land to produce than the other choices at the cafeteria.

“No question, there’s something fun about eating PB&J, and we do have a good recipe,” she said. “Our staff enjoys programs like this and maybe we got the word out about sustainability.”

 

Anita Williams said yes to an Earth DayvPB&J

Anita Williams said yes to an Earth DayvPB&J

 

Biochar – Dr. Debbie Hanmer made biochar, a charcoal product that is a soil additive. She and several undergraduate students are experimenting with.

Biochar – Dr. Debbie Hanmer made biochar, a charcoal product that is a soil additive. She and several undergraduate students are experimenting with.

 

A salad will serve the same purpose for Phillip Charles

A salad will serve the same purpose for Phillip Charles

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