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Southeast Indian Studies Conference a major success for attendees

By Lauren Allen
Around The Town Editor

The Southeast Indian Studies Conference focusing on tradition, identity and recognition began April 20 at 8 a.m. and continued until 3 p.m. April 21. The purpose of the conference was to provide a forum for discussion of the culture, history, art, health and contemporary issues of Native Americans in the southeast.

From left, Billie Hunt, Sallie Hunt and Lawrence Locklear talk during a break from the Southeast Conference.

Photo Courtesy of Native American Studies
From left, Billie Hunt, Sallie Hunt and Lawrence Locklear talk during a break from the Southeast Conference.

In addition, the conference also served as a critical venue for scholars, students and all persons interested in American Indian Studies in the region. Welcoming those to the conference were UNCP Provost Charles Harrington, Tribal Chairman of the Lumbee Tribe, Jimmy Goins, and Professor and Chair of the American Indian Studies Department at UNCP Linda Oxendine.

Many guest speakers came from out of state to participate in the conference, including Dr. Anne Walter from State University of New York, Dr. Richard Kania from Jacksonville State University, Dr. David Wilkins from the University of Minnesota, Richard Haithcock from Ohio Saponi and Dr. Cynthia Kassee from the Jeminole Tribe of Florida.

Local community members and professors at UNCP spoke as well, including Billie Jo Hunt, Dr. Mike Spivey, Dr. Jay Hansford C. Vest, Dr. Stan Knick and Dr. Jamie M. Litty.

A variety of topics were covered at the conference, including southeast Indian metaphysics; the power of subsistence life ways: sustaining our spirits; culture and health; and effectiveness of targeted messages in a health video for Lumbee women, just to name a few.

Those in attendance were also invited to visit the Native American Resource Center, located on the first floor of Old Main. The Southeast Indian Studies Conference was sponsored by the Department of American Indian Studies, the Museum of Native American Resource Center, the Office of Academic Affairs and the Regional Center for Economic, Community and Personal Development.


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Updated: Thursday, May 11, 2006
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