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Robeson County celebrates 225 years

By Samantha Langley
Asst. Around the Town Editor

September 27, 2012


Photo by Samantha Langley
Children raced through this play jail obstacle course in attempt to escape before being captured by the jailer on Sept. 13.
Robeson County celebrated its 225th anniversary on Sept. 13 with a party at the county's DSS Complex.

There was free food, goodie bags, blow-up rides, a musical performance by Dark Water Rising and much more.

According to Ricky Harris, the Robeson County Manager, around 3,500 people showed up to the event.

"We feel that it's a very important occasion for our county. It shows the deep history of Robeson County," Harris said.

In order to mark this occasion, the county will be burying a time capsule next month. At the event people can take their picture and get a postcard with their picture on it. They were able to keep one copy and another copy will be placed in the time capsule.

According to Harris, other groups such as Robeson County schools and a few churches in the area are also going to add items and testimonies to the capsule. The time capsule is set to be opened in 25 years.

Apart from the time capsule, there were many other events for participants to enjoy. A train ran around the area giving rides to small children and their families. Large blow-up rides featuring colorful scenarios, such as being trapped on a ship occupied by giant octopus and sliding down the tongue of a T-rex, were set up for children.

The county also provided hot dogs and hamburgers, chips and drinks to everyone.

Dark Water Rising, a local band, provided musical entertainment for the evening.

Different businesses and organizations also had booths at the event.

The North Carolina State University booth allowed people to make a small garden in a brightly colored container.
Photo by Samantha Langley
Children raced through this play jail obstacle course in attempt to escape before being captured by the jailer on Sept. 13.
The fire department gave safety tips to children and allowed them to escape a mock fire in their "Safe House" trailer.

Many speakers also spoke at the event about Robeson County.

Blake Tyner, administrative support associate in the art department and Executive Director of the Robeson County History Museum, was one of the key speakers at the event. He gave a speech about the history of Robeson County.

According to Tyner, Robeson County was originally founded in 1787 by Cornel Thomas Robeson whom the county was named after. The County was originally of Scottish heritage, and settlers came here because of the Lumber River and farm land.

"We need to keep our history in our minds. Robeson County is unique in the fact that it has always been racially diverse between whites, Native Americans and African-Americans, and we can all see the influence from people that have came from Robeson County," Tyner said.

Victor Dial, a UNCP student, said that he wished UNCP had a bigger booth at the event.

"Not a lot of Native Americans come down to the college, and this would have been a great chance to get them more interested in the University," Dial said.

Dial said that the county's history has had a large influence on his life because he's lived around here throughout his life.

Overall, Harris was pleased with the event.

"It was a splendid day and occasion. I just wish it would have been a little cooler," Harris commented.
Photo by Samantha Langley Photo by Samantha Langley
Children were able to slide down the mouth of this inflatable T-Rex slide. The sharp teeth didn’t puncture the ride.

The county provided many blowup rides for children at the event. Many of which had odd themes as found here in this pirate-themed obstacle course and slide.

Photo by Samantha Langley

Photo by Samantha Langley

A train runs around the grounds giving rides to toddlers and their families. Many of the children could be seen doing their own mock whistle blowing along with the conductor. A train runs around the grounds giving rides to toddlers and their families. Many of the children could be seen doing their own mock whistle blowing along with the conductor.



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Updated: Tuesday, October 9, 2012
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