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Swine Flu cases spark questions, caution from campus community

By Kayloni Wyatt
Managing Editor
Hayley Burgess
News Editor

Sarah Beal sanitizes hands
Photo by Glory Attaochu
Freshman Sarah Beal sanitizes her hands before she enters the cafeteria for lunch.

H1N1, or Swine Flu, has arrived on campus with five reported cases. As of Sept. 8 all those confirmed cases have been told to go home or stay insolated until their fevers go down.

Students who have shown symptoms have been given a flu-kit, which contains hand sanitizer, Kleenex, mask and thermometer.

If students show any symptoms, they are told to keep themselves isolated or go home if they live close enough. They should also notify their instructors, don’t interact with others and don’t go anywhere within 24 hours if they have a fever.

North Carolina received its first official confirmed cases of Swine Flu on May 3 in Onslow County. So far there have been nine deaths in North Carolina.

North Carolina received its first official confirmed cases of Swine Flu on May 3 in Onslow County. So far there have been nine deaths in North Carolina.

Across the UNC school system about 1,500 to 1,600 students have been diagnosed with the flu.

The most common way of getting H1N1 is by the flu entering through the nasal passages. H1N1 is also passed along by droplets from the nose or mouth from coughing or sneezing.

Here is a list of H1N1 flu symptoms:
• Fever
• Sore Throat
• Chills
• Diarrhea
• Runny or Stuffy Nose
• Cough
• Body Aches
• Fatigue
• Vomiting
• Headache

Germs can live on the surfaces for approximately eight hours. Sanitizing and doing preventive measures is the best way to stay in good health.

If someone who has the H1N1 flu has a roommate, the person is urged to be cautious and make sure that he/she covers the mouth and nose when he/she coughs or sneezes.

If the roommate wishes to stay somewhere else with friends who are not sick, they may. A person who has Swine Flu may also get a “flu buddy.”

“A flu buddy can go to the cafeteria and pick up a flu packet that contains food that will last up to three days. It has soup, juice, fruit, crackers, Jell- O and Gatorade. You can also ask your RA to pick it up for you,” said Director of Student Health Services Cora Bullard.

The flu packets are available in the cafeteria.

“We’ve seen students come in who have the other two symptoms of vomiting and diarrhea. It’s affecting our young people more than anything,” Bullard said.

Bullard also stated that if it becomes more widespread on campus that some events such as GPAC or sporting events might be cancelled.

The faculty and staff on campus have taken some precautions when it comes to H1N1.

Housekeeping is now required to wear gloves and increase their cleaning methods. Lysol has become very common to see on campus.

“There will be ‘Clean Hands’ stickers in every bathroom on campus. It shows the proper method to hand washing,” Bullard said.

There will also be hand-sanitizing stations in certain parts of campus to ensure that everyone is taking the proper precautions. On Sept. 8 the cafeteria placed two hand-sanitizing cans at the beginning of the card line. Students are reminded to sanitize their hands as they enter.

There will also be hand-sanitizing stations in certain parts of campus to ensure that everyone is taking the proper precautions. On Sept. 8 the cafeteria placed two hand-sanitizing cans at the beginning of the card line. Students are reminded to sanitize their hands as they enter.

“If you think you’re feeling sick, come to the student health services and get checked. Isolate yourself from others and start taking over-thecounter fever reducing medications,” Bullard said.

Nurse Office
Photo by Glory Attaochu
A student checks in for her appointment at Student Health Services. All students who think they are sick are required to wear a face mask to
prevent the sickness from spreading.

The H1N1 vaccine will be available in the middle of October. Everyone is recommended to receive the seasonal flu vaccine and the H1N1 vaccine. The flu vaccine is $10, but the H1N1 vaccine will be free when it becomes available.

Certain priority groups such as pregnant women, people under the age of 24 years old, people with chronic health disorders or compromised immune systems over 25 years old are highly recommended to get both vaccines.

It will be available for all UNCP students at designated times when they present their student I.D. card. There are two injections that must be given in a three-week span.

There could be more cases, but only people who the health center has seen and checked have been confirmed.

“We are preparing for it. We may see a lot of students. We are getting prepared just in case,” Bullard said.

Here are a few tips to prevent the flu:
• Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
• If you don’t have a tissue, cough or sneeze into your upper sleeve, not your hands.
• Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth. Germs spread this way.
• Try to avoid close contact with sick people.
• If you get sick with flu, stay home from work or school and limit contact with others to keep from making them sick.
• Get recommended seasonal flu vaccine when it becomes available.
• Get recommended H1N1 vaccine when

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Updated: Sunday, October 4, 2009
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